Posts Tagged ‘Tax’

The Do’s and Don’ts of Summertime Tax Prep

Thursday, August 7th, 2014

It’s the beginning of August and you’re probably not keeping yourself up at night thinking about your taxes. Frankly, who has time to think about itemized deductions and tax-free distributions when you would rather be grilling out, soaking in the sun, or enjoying your family vacation? April 15, 2015, may be more than 260 days away, but now is a great time to look at your taxes and make necessary adjustments to effectively sidestep any potential problems that might cause problems when tax season does arrive.

Consider These Tax Prep Do’s and Don’ts

  • Don’t assume that filing your taxes will be the same as the year before. More than 50 tax provisions expired on Dec. 31.
  • Do make yourself aware of any changes that have occurred since last tax season. Click here to view the most up-to-date list. Some of the most common expired provisions include:
    • Itemized deduction for state and local general sales tax
    • Itemized deduction for mortgage insurance premiums (PMI)
    • Tax-free distributions from individual retirement plans for charitable purposes
    • 50 percent accelerated tax depreciation (“Bonus depreciation”).
    • Increased expensing. (This provision allows businesses to deduct the full purchase price of qualified equipment.) Current 2014 provisions are $25,000 deduction with a $200,000 limitation on purchases.
  • Do take time to manage your files. It’s much more manageable to file six months’ worth of receipts vs. a whole years’ worth in January. Are you looking for inspiration? Now is a good time to start organizing medical and charitable contribution receipts.
  • Do make a note as to whether the size of your household changed.
  • Don’t forget to review your withholdings. Did you receive a large refund in 2013? Did you owe the IRS in April? To adjust your withholdings, speak with your payroll representative and complete a new W-4.
  • Do send your estimated payments for income to the IRS every quarter to avoid charges and penalties for underpayments. If you forgot to make a payment or you underpaid in April or June, don’t worry. There’s still time to catch up on your September and January payments.
  • Don’t underestimate the short-term value of retirement contributions. Aside from the long-term savings benefits, many retirement accounts are a great tax deferral. If you are participating and not maxing out, consider increasing your contribution. Contributions to a Traditional IRA are another consideration.
  • Do set aside some time to review your health insurance situation. Alternatively, if you did not maintain health care coverage (and were not exempted) you will owe a penalty with your 2014 1040.
  • Do confirm that you comply with the new repair/capitalization regulations.

Tax Prep Help

A few minutes of work and organization now could save you some major headaches in April. Don’t miss out on your opportunity to jump start your tax prep. Want more tax prep tips? Contact Rea & Associates. Our team of Ohio tax professionals can help you determine what you need to do now to ensure tax time goes smoothly for you.

Author: Meredith Mullet, CPA (Wooster office)

 

Want more tax prep tips? Check these blog posts out:

What Should You Do After Tax Season?

How Can A Small Business Owner Keep More Money In Their Pocket?

So Is It a Tax Credit Or a Tax Deduction?

 

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How Far Back Can The IRS Go For Tax Auditing?

Friday, June 20th, 2014

As a CPA I am frequently asked, “How far back can the IRS look to audit my tax return?” That’s a great question. Can the IRS go back and audit your tax return from five years ago? 10 years ago? 25 years ago? Before you start to panic, rest assured that the IRS has a statute of limitations in place that generally puts a limit on the time allowed to audit you and assess additional tax.

Typically, the statute of limitations is three years for the IRS to include a tax return in an audit. This means the statute of limitations likely ran out on the majority of 2010 returns. The 2010 returns would have been due on April 15, 2011 … three years from that date was April 15, 2014. So most taxpayers are out of the woods for 2010 tax returns and all prior years. This same statute of limitations applies to the taxpayer when they would request a tax refund – you can only go back three years’ worth of returns to request a tax refund.

IRS Statute of Limitations Can Be Extended

But wait, before you start high-fiving everyone around you … that statute of limitations can be stretched out to six years if a substantial error is identified. A substantial error is defined as an omission of 25 percent or more of gross income. This may also apply to basis overstatements whenever property is sold.  Basis generally means the amount of capital investment in a property for tax purposes.

The U.S. Tax Court has given mixed results on whether or not basis overstatements constitute understatements of gross income. The Federal, Washington D.C., 7th  and 10th circuits have ruled in favor of the IRS, supporting the concept that basis overstatements open up the six-year statute. However, the 4th, 5th, and 9th circuits have ruled in favor of the taxpayer, holding that basis overstatements do not constitute substantial understatements of gross income.

When The IRS Statute of Limitations Doesn’t Expire

There are situations when the statute of limitations never expires. The most common is when a return never is filed. The other situation is when the IRS sues for civil tax fraud. Civil tax fraud cases are extremely rare because the burden of proof is so high for the IRS. The older the fraud, the colder the trail gets.

The IRS has stated that it tries to audit tax returns as soon as possible after they are filed. But in my professional experience, most audits are typically of returns filed within the last two years.

If an audit is not finished, the taxpayer may be asked to extend the statute of limitations for assessment of his or her tax return. Extending the statute will allow additional time to provide additional documentation to support a position, request an appeal if there is a disagreement with the audit results, or to claim a tax refund or credit. The extension will also allow the IRS time to complete the audit and provide additional time to process the audit results. It’s not mandatory to agree to extend the statute of limitations date. However, if the taxpayer does not agree, the auditor will be forced to make a determination based upon the information on hand at the time, which may not be favorable.

Tax Audit Help

If you’re concerned you’re at risk of an IRS audit or are looking for some clarity on the IRS statute of limitation for tax auditing, contact Rea & Associates. Our team of Ohio tax professionals can help you determine if you could be facing an audit, and can walk you through the process.

Author: Matt Pottmeyer, CPA (Marietta office)

 

Looking for additional articles about managing your taxes? Check these blog posts out:

What Tax Liabilities Accompany Inherited Real Estate?

What Should You Do After Tax Season?

How Can You Best Prepare For The Upcoming Tax Season?

 

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What Is The Petroleum Activities Tax and How Does It Affect My Business?

Monday, March 10th, 2014

Remember the CAT—the Commercial Activity Tax? Well, there’s another acronym you’ll need to get familiar with – the PAT, the Petroleum Activities Tax. Starting July 1, any receipts from the sale of motor fuel will be excluded from Commercial Activity Tax (CAT) receipts. That means if you’re a supplier of motor fuel, you’ll have to pay the replacement Petroleum Activities Tax (PAT), measured by your gross receipts for first sales of motor fuel outside of the distribution system in Ohio.  (more…)

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Will You Be Paying With Cash, Credit Or Bitcoins?

Wednesday, January 29th, 2014

Bitcoin has been all over the news lately, and you may be asking – what exactly is it? Bitcoin is a virtual currency. Only existing online, it’s powered by its users and not backed by any government agency. This new currency offers anonymity, convenience, helps facilitate international commerce and can fluctuate in value. Check out www.bitcoin.org for more information and frequently asked questions.  (more…)

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How Can You Best Prepare For The Upcoming Tax Season?

Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

It’s the holiday season, and you know what that means. I’m not talking about shopping or decorating or eating until your heart’s content. I’m talking about cleaning out those filing cabinets and getting ready for tax time! The more prepared and organized you can be as you approach tax season, the smoother a process you can create for yourself or your business.  (more…)

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