Posts Tagged ‘retirement plan sponsor’

Don’t Like Your Retirement Plan Design?

Friday, August 28th, 2015

Time’s Running Out to Establish, Alter Your Plan

Time's Running Out to Establish, Alter Your Retirement Plan Design - Rea & Associates - Ohio CPA Firm

If you haven’t made time to speak with a retirement plan specialist recently to make sure that your retirement plan still addresses your company’s unique needs, there’s a chance you are missing out on a more cost-effective solution. Your retirement plan team can quickly run some illustrative numbers to compare your SEP against a 401(k) plan to reveal whether a better option exists for your business.

Your SIMPLE IRA or Safe Harbor 401(k) plan isn’t going to establish or change itself and if you want yours to be effective in 2015, you need to know that an Oct. 1 deadline is looming – as though you really needed something else to worry about. Fortunately, a retirement plan expert will not only help you meet your deadline, they can make sure your plan is optimized to ensure maximum results.

If you’ve never taken the time to really understand how valuable your retirement plan can be for your business, this is your chance. Read on to learn six other reasons why you might want to pick up the phone and schedule a meeting with a retirement plan expert today.

Read: Why You Should Review Your Retirement Plan Documents Now

Six Reasons To Call Your Retirement Plan Administrator

  1. You have no retirement plan at all. Offering your employees a retirement plan is more than just a great recruitment tool; it’s an excellent way to make your company’s profits go further. Read Retirement Plan Design: One Size Does Not Fit All to learn more about how a retirement plan might help bolster your business’s growth strategy.
  2. You have a SEP Plan with more than two employees. If you haven’t made time to speak with a retirement plan specialist recently to make sure that your retirement plan still addresses your company’s unique needs, there’s a chance you are missing out on a more cost-effective solution. Your retirement plan team can quickly run some illustrative numbers to compare your SEP against a 401(k) plan to reveal whether a better option exists for your business.
  3. You are a business owner who is able to maximize deferrals every year with a SIMPLE IRA. If so, it may be time to consider a Safe Harbor 401(k) plan in 2016 for additional tax deferral. For more insight into how this option can work for you, read Safe Harbor 401(k) Plans Provide Smooth Sailing.
  4. You have a 401(k) but receive corrective distributions every year. You may be missing out on a retirement plan design that can not only alleviate this problem, but can help you maximize the benefits your business receives for being active participants in your employees’ retirement strategy. Access Safe Harbor FAQ here.
  5. You maximize deferrals every year under your Safe Harbor 401(k) plan but offer no profit sharing option. A better plan design for business owners in this situation might be to maximize profit sharing contributions while limiting the amount that has to be provided to employees. For example, cross-tested profit sharing plans may save you money if your company’s staff consists primarily of younger employees. A retirement plan expert can help you identify a plan that helps address the uniqueness of your business.
  6. You are maxing out your profit sharing plan every year. It’s time to add a cash balance option to your existing retirement plan. This is a great option for business owners in this position, because it allows for much higher employer contribution deductibles for owners. Click here to learn more about how these plans can help your business.

Take control of your retirement plan today. Email a Rea & Associates retirement plan expert to find out what you have been missing.

By Steve Renner, QKA (New Philadelphia office)

Check out these articles for more helpful retirement plan advice specifically for small and midsize businesses.

Like Losing Your Wallet – Only Worse
Retirement Roulette
The ‘Van Halen’ Philosophy of Retirement Plan Compliance

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Six Things 401k Plan Sponsors Need To Do Now

Friday, January 16th, 2015
2015 Retirement Plan Deadlines - Ohio CPA Firm

Mark your calendars and don’t forget these 2015 retirement plan deadlines. Click on the image to easily see what is due and when to file.

January may be flying by, but the New Year is still fresh. This is still a great time to make sure that the qualified 401k plan you offer your employees helps them effectively save for retirement and remains qualified. Not sure where to start? Here are six ways to get the most out of your 401k plan:

1. Review Your Match Formula

An employer match can be critical to helping your employees meet their retirement goals and stretching the match formula is a great way to entice employees to save more. Instead of matching 100 percent on the first 2 percent of deferrals, consider changing your contribution formula to 50 percent on the first 4 percent of deferrals, or 25 percent on the first 8 percent of deferrals instead. Each one of these formulas will result in a 2 percent wage cost to you, the employer, but changing the formula may encourage additional employee saving. Instead of saving 4 percent of their income (2 percent employee income plus 2 percent employer match), the employee may be motivated to increase contributions to their retirement plan to 10 percent (8 percent employee income plus 2 percent employer match). Contact your TPA to discuss different strategies.

2. Check Your Contribution Limits

Did you know that the 401(k) and 403(b) plan deferral limits have increased to $18,000? Employees older than 50, now have the option to defer an additional $6,000 of their wages toward retirement. Encourage your employees to review their payroll deduction to ensure that they are on target to meet their personal savings goals.

3. Offer Your 401(k) Plan To All Eligible Employees

If your 401(k) plan has an entry date of Jan. 1, be sure all newly eligible employees were provided the opportunity to participate in the plan. Even if you have an employee who doesn’t want to participate, I recommend that you obtain a signed election form that indicates a 401(k) election of “0 percent.” By doing this, you have documentation that they employee was offered the chance to participate, even though they decided not to.

4. Provide Employee Census To Your TPA

Your third party administrator (TPA) needs yearly plan census information to conduct compliance testing, verify 401(k) and to calculate matching contributions and profit sharing allocations. The deadline for most compliance tests is March 15.

5. Check Your Fidelity Bond

The Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) requires a fidelity bond for every plan fiduciary and for those who handle the funds or property of a plan. The bond must be at least 10 percent of the company’s plan assets. It’s a good idea to ensure that your bond is still meeting the 10 percent minimum requirement.

6. Restate Your Plan Document

Prototype documents for 401(k) plans currently are in a restatement window; therefore, if your plan uses a prototype document, it must be updated to meet new IRS standards. This document restatement period is a great time to examine your plan provisions. For example, do you want to change eligibility requirements or add a loan provision that you have contemplated adding in the past? This is a good time to make those changes. The deadline for restating 401(k) prototype documents is April 30, 2016. Managing your company’s retirement plan can be confusing or overwhelming at times, but it doesn’t have to be. Email Rea & Associates today to learn more. By Steve Renner, QKA (New Philadelphia office)

Related Articles

Why Should You Review Your Retirement Plan Documents Now?

Do You Need To Send An Annual Notice To Your 401(K) Participants?

What Should Plan Sponsors Ask Their Investment Advisors?

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DOMA’s Effect On Retirement Plans And Beneficiary Forms

Monday, May 12th, 2014

Last June, the U.S. Supreme Court, in United States v. Windsor, ruled that Section 3 of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) is unconstitutional. As you may recall, DOMA Section 3 states, “In determining the meaning of any Act of Congress, or of any ruling, regulation, or interpretation of the various administrative bureaus and agencies of the United States, the word ‘marriage’ means only a legal union between one man and one woman as husband and wife, and the word ‘spouse’ refers only to a person of the opposite sex who is a husband or a wife.”

By holding Section 3 of DOMA unconstitutional, qualified retirement plans must now treat the relationship of same‐gender married couples as a marriage in order to maintain the plans’ tax‐qualified status. The term “spouse” includes an individual married to a person of the same-gender if the individuals are lawfully married under state or foreign law.

The IRS recognizes a valid same-gender marriage even if the married couple is living in a state that does not recognize same-gender marriages. The term “spouse” doesn’t include individuals who have entered into a registered domestic partnership, civil union, or other similar relationship that is not defined as marriage.

Important DOMA Information for Plan Sponsors

  • Participants (and their spouses) who are in same-gender marriages generally must be treated as married for all purposes under a retirement plan. This was effective as of June 26, 2013.
  • As of September 16, 2013, your plan must recognize same-gender marriages that were lawfully performed under the laws of the 50 states, D.C., U.S. territory or a foreign jurisdiction.
  • States that currently recognize same-gender marriages include: California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois (law will take effect on June 1, 2014), Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont and Washington.
  • Depending on whose retirement plan provider plan document you use, you may want to contact the provider to ensure that your retirement plan complies with these new rules. In general, amendments to such plans are due by the end of the plan’s remedial amendment period, or December 31, 2014.
  • As a plan sponsor, you have no obligation to notify current or former participants of the new rules.
  • All qualified plans must recognize same-gender marriages for all plan purposes. This would include provisions applicable to beneficiary designation, death benefits, applicable spousal consent requirements regarding distributions and loans, rollovers, etc.

Retirement Plan Help

Now is the perfect time to update beneficiary forms for all participants in your plan. It’s important you keep a current copy of each participant’s beneficiary form in his or her personnel file. If you need assistance with this, contact Rea & Associates. Our Ohio benefit plan services team can help you determine what you need to do to keep in compliance with IRS and DOL regulations.

Author: Andrea McLane, QKA (Dublin office)

 

Looking for more posts about retirement plan best practices? Check these out:

What Are The Rules For Taking A Distribution from My 401(k) Plan?

What Should Plan Sponsors Ask Their Investment Advisors?

What Are The Responsibilities of a Fiduciary?

 

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What Are The Responsibilities of a Fiduciary?

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014

Do you ever long for the carefree bliss of your childhood? No real responsibility. No bills to pay. No one depending on your performance. While it’s nice to daydream, it’s never going to happen, especially considering the fiduciary responsibility you have as a plan sponsor.  (more…)

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