Posts Tagged ‘IRS guidelines’

What You Should Know Before Dipping Into Your 401(k)

Friday, May 16th, 2014

Got a 401(k) plan? Have you ever withdrawn money from your 401(k) account? If so, you’re part of the growing number of Americans using their 401(k) accounts to fund other areas of their lives. A recent Bloomberg article explains that more and more Americans are turning to their 401(k) accounts rather than to other means, such as a loan, to help cover any unexpected financial needs that come up.

Historically, Americans have used their homes as a source of additional money. According to the article, when home values rose, homeowners refinanced or took out second mortgages. But due to the housing collapse back in 2008, many homeowners don’t have these options anymore – so they turned to their 401(k) accounts. What many people don’t realize is that depending on their 401(k) plan, they could be penalized for either taking an early withdrawal and/or not putting that money back into their account in the appropriate amount of time.

Shocking 401(k) Withdrawal Statistics

The Bloomberg article cites an IRS report that states the agency collected $5.7 billion in withdrawal penalties in 2011. In other words, Americans withdrew nearly $57 billion from their retirement accounts. That’s $5.7 billion that the IRS would otherwise not have banked on receiving. And what’s the federal government doing with this “extra” income? Funding federal agencies and projects.

Think Before You Dip

Before you turn to your retirement plan for help, you should be aware of some things. It may seem like an easy option, but the IRS actually has some rules that you have to meet before taking money from your 401(k). One of the following conditions must occur before you can take money out without being penalized:

  • You lose your job
  • You claim disability
  • You or your spouse dies
  • You turn 59 ½ years old

401(k) Withdrawal Based on Financial Hardship

If you don’t meet the criteria listed above, but are facing a financial hardship, you may also be able to take an early withdrawal from your retirement account. The IRS’ hardship rules require you have one of the following needs to qualify for a hardship withdrawal:

  • Medical expenses for you or your immediate family
  • Financial assistance in the purchase of your primary residence (this excludes mortgage payments)
  • Tuition or other educational fees (maximum of 12 months) for you or your immediate family
  • Prevent the eviction of you from your primary place of residence
  • Burial or funeral expenses for deceased parent, spouse or other immediate family member
  • Expenses for the repair of damage to your principal residence

The amount of money you take can’t be more than the amount you actually need to cover your hardship. It’s important to note that your early withdrawal due to a financial hardship is subject to state and federal taxes, and is also subject to a 10 percent early withdrawal penalty if you are under age 59 ½. So keep all of these considerations in mind when deciding whether to dip into your retirement account.

401(k) Withdrawal Help

If you’re not sure if a retirement withdrawal is the best route to go, contact Rea & Associates. Our team of Ohio retirement plan services professionals can help you determine if you’re eligible and what you need to do to minimize your tax liability from a withdrawal.

Author: Steve Renner, QKA (New Philadelphia office)

 

Looking for more information related to 401(k) or retirement plan withdrawals? Check out these blog posts:

Will I Be Penalized for a Hardship 401(k) Withdrawal?

Raiding Your 401(k)? It’ll Cost You

What Are The Rules For Taking A Distribution from My 401(k) Plan?

 

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What Should You Know About 2014 Standard Mileage Rates?

Tuesday, January 14th, 2014

Do you use your personal vehicle for business purposes when you’re on the clock? Or do you use your vehicle medical, moving or charitable purposes? If so, did you know that you can claim a tax deduction on the mileage you rack up?  (more…)

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What Is The Difference Between Fixed Asset Expensing And Capitalization?

Thursday, October 17th, 2013

If you’re about to acquire, produce or improve real or tangible personal property, and then turn around and use the property in a trade of business for income, stop right there. Under the Internal Revenue Code, you’re required to capitalize certain amounts of money you invested into the property.  (more…)

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