Posts Tagged ‘IRA’

Late Rollovers May Benefit From New IRS Guidance

Tuesday, September 20th, 2016
IRS Lifts Restrictions | Retirement Savings | Ohio CPA Firm

American taxpayers can celebrate now that a range of restrictions known to hinder taxpayers’ efforts to save for their golden years due to circumstances beyond their control have been lifted by the IRS. This is a big win that will save thousands of IRAs from the harsh bite of needless and accelerated taxation. Keep reading to learn more.

Did you miss the deadline to rollover your retirement plan or traditional IRA funds due to circumstances beyond your control? In the past, such an issue would have resulted in issues on your tax return and/or an expensive private letter ruling request, culminating in a full-fledged assault on your retirement nest egg. Fortunately, the IRS released new guidance that may eliminate this costly headache by simplifying the way retirement rollovers are managed when they are made outside of the 60-day rollover deadline.

Effective Aug. 24, 2016, according to the IRS, taxpayers who miss the 60-day deadline for at least one of the 11 specific reasons outlined in Rev. Proc. 2016-47, may avoid immediate taxation if a self-certification letter is submitted to the IRA trustee or plan administrator.  Under the new rule, as long as the reason for their tardiness meets one or more of the 11 conditions outlined in the provision and the late rollover contribution is completed “as soon as practicable after the applicable reason (s) no longer prevents the taxpayer from making the contribution. The practicable timeframe is noted as 30 days in the guidance.

Read Also: Brush Up On These New Tax Form Due Dates

With regard to the validity of the taxpayer’s claim, the revenue procedure indicates that self-certification is all that’s required to be completed and submitted to the trustee or plan administrator. Please note, however, that the self-certification is not to be considered a waiver of the 60-day requirement as the IRS reserves the right to deny the request if an audit finds that the taxpayer failed to meet the requirements of Rev. Proc. 2016-47.

11 Reasons To File Your Late Rollover Contribution Self-Certification Letter

As long as the IRS has not previously denied the taxpayer’s waiver request made with respect to a rollover contribution of all or part of a related distribution, the 11 conditions considered to be acceptable for missing the 60-day deadline are:

  1. An error was committed by the financial institution receiving the contribution or making the distribution to which the contribution relates;
  2. The distribution having been made in the form of a check, was misplaced and never cashed;
  3. The distribution was deposited into and remained in an account that the taxpayer mistakenly thought was an eligible retirement plan;
  4. The taxpayer’s principal residence was severely damaged;
  5. A member of the taxpayer’s family died;
  6. The taxpayer or a member of the taxpayer’s family was seriously ill;
  7. The taxpayer was incarcerated;
  8. Restrictions were imposed by a foreign country;
  9. A postal error occurred;
  10. The distribution was made on account of a levy under § 6331 and the proceeds of the levy have been returned to the taxpayer; or
  11. The party making the distribution to which the rollover relates delayed providing information that the receiving plan or IRA required to complete the rollover despite the taxpayer’s reasonable efforts to obtain the information.

This is a big win for the American taxpayer, as it effectively lifts a range of restrictions known to hinder taxpayers’ efforts to save for their golden years due to circumstances beyond their control – saving “thousands of IRAs from the harsh bite of needless and accelerated taxation.” To make a certified late rollover contribution, your letter must also adhere to certain specifications. I recommend customizing the letter provided by the IRS in Rev. Proc. 2016-47. It can be accessed here. Once you have completed the letter, remember to retain a copy of it in your files to ensure it is available if the IRS requests this information during an audit.

Email Rea & Associates to learn more about how this new provision will be beneficial to you.

By Wendy Shick, CPA, CFP (Mentor office)

Check out these articles for more great helpful information to review as you prepare to file your taxes:

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Environmentally Friendly Tax Savings

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You Can Still Have The Final Say After Death

Friday, October 23rd, 2015
Estate Planning - Ohio CPA Firm

It doesn’t matter if you have a lot of assets to pass on or very few, estate planning is one of the best things you can do for yourself and for those you love.

Life is full of enjoyable experiences. Spending time with family and friends, hiking through the woods, spending the afternoon on the lake, immersing yourself in a hobby – these are the moments we live for. What if you could give yourself the opportunity to make those moments more enjoyable? Would you take that opportunity?

Click To Listen To Episode 6 of Unsuitable on Rea Radio: The Grim Reaper Is Coming … And He Wants Your Money

Every time you avoid the conversation about estate planning you miss out on a chance to make this period of your life even more enjoyable – for you, and for your loved ones. Once you have made your plans with regard to what you want to happen after your death, those thoughts are no longer in the back of your mind. They are decided and you can truly enjoy the moment with your friends and family.

Three Things Everybody Should Know About Estate Planning

  1. Estate planning is for everybody. Estate planning isn’t just dependent on your assets; it’s about identifying what you want to happen after you pass away. Who do you want to take care of your children, for example, and do you want that person to be financially responsible for them as well – they don’t necessarily have to be the same people. When you take control of your estate planning, you are effectively helping to ease the burden that is already felt by your loved ones. Not only will you have already made the difficult decisions, but you can do so in a way that provides additional benefits for your heirs while securing your legacy.
  2. If you have an IRA, don’t forget to name your contingent beneficiary.  It’s common to have an IRA through your employer, but oftentimes naming the IRA’s contingent beneficiary is forgotten. Usually it’s your spouse, but if your spouse has already passed away, you need to make sure to name a new contingent beneficiary. This is just one simple way to plan ahead, but it’s frequently overlooked.
  3. Probate Court isn’t always a bad thing. You hear people say things like: “You want to avoid probate at all costs.” But that’s not necessarily the case. For example, imagine that you’ve made plans to have all your assets go directly to your three children – avoiding the probate process altogether. When it comes time to pay for your funeral, you would hope that your three children would split the cost three ways without much ado. But, without Probate Court to mediate the situation, one child could decide that they don’t want to pay their portion, which would leave the other two children with the bill. When you bring probate into the equation, you help ensure that there is enough money available to cover these necessary funeral expenses.

Find Time To Enjoy More

It doesn’t matter if you have a lot of assets to pass on or very few, estate planning is one of the best things you can do for yourself and for those you love. The sooner you start planning yours, the sooner you can get back to enjoying the moments that truly make life worth living.

By Dave McCarthy, CPA, CSEP (Medina office)

Dave McCarthy Discusses Estate Planning during Unsuitable on Rea RadioLearn more about the importance of estate planning. Listen to “The Grim Reaper Is Coming … And He Wants Your Money” podcast on Unsuitable on Rea Radio at www.reacpa.com/podcast or on iTunes or SoundCloud.

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Save More For Retirement in 2015

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

As you work to secure your retirement, you may be pleased to find out about changes to several retirement-related items that may allow you to put a little more cash away in 2015. In October, the IRS announced several adjustments to the limitations previously set on retirement planning tools as a result of an increased cost-of-living. So what does that mean to you and your retirement plan(s) of choice? Take a look:

  • If you contribute to a 401(k), 403(b), 457 plan or a Thrift Savings Plan, the following changes could impact how you contribute:

–        You can now invest up to $18,000 annually – this is an increase up from $17,500.

–        If you’re 50 years old or older and are trying to catch-up on your retirement savings, you may now invest $6,000 annually. The previous catch-up contribution limit was $5,500.

  • If you contribute to an individual retirement account (IRA), you will see the following changes in 2015:

–        The annual limit and additional catch-up contribution limit for an IRA for individuals 50 years old and older will not change in 2015. The annual contribution is $5,500 and the catch-up contribution is $1,000.

–        Single filers and heads of household who are covered by a workplace retirement plan and have adjusted gross incomes (AGI) between $61,000 and $71,000 will no longer be eligible to receive a deduction for contributing to their traditional IRA. This has increased from $60,000 and $70,000 in 2014.

–        Married couples who file jointly, where one spouse makes an IRA contribution that is covered by a workplace retirement plan, will see an increased income phase-out range for taking the deduction as well. The new range is $98,000-$118,000 – up from $96,000-$116,000.

–        If you’re an IRA contributor, not covered by a workplace retirement plan, but are married to someone who is covered, the deduction is phased out if you and your spouse’s income falls between $183,000 and $193,000 – up from $181,000 and $191,000.

–        The phase-out range for a married taxpayer who files a separate return and who is covered by a workplace retirement plan will not change in 2015. The range remains $0 to $10,000.

  • If you make contributions to a Roth IRA, you will see the following changes:

–        The phase-out range for married couples filing jointly is $183,000 to $193,000 – an increase from $181,000 to $191,000.

–        The phase-out range for single filers and heads of household is $116,000 to $131,000 – an increase from $114,000 to $129,000.

–        The phase-out range for a married individual who files a separate return is unchanged.

As we approach the end of the year, there’s not a better time to evaluate your current retirement plan situation and determine if you need to make any changes for 2015. To learn more about how these retirement plan changes could impact your financial situation, email Rea & Associates.

By Paul McEwan, CPA, MT, AIFA (New Philadelphia office)

 

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Need Some Cash Now?

Friday, July 19th, 2013

Are you in the market for a new home? Or maybe you’re looking to purchase a new car for your daughter or son? Don’t have enough cash for a down payment? No problem. There’s a nice workaround that can provide short-term relief for your immediate need.  (more…)

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How Can Retirement Provisions in the President’s 2014 Budget Proposal Affect You?

Thursday, April 25th, 2013

The past few weeks have been full of high visibility news stories ranging from the tragic Boston Marathon bombing to the devastating plant explosion in West, Texas. Amidst these stories and others, there was one important story you may have missed that could affect you and your retirement in a very significant way. President Obama recently unveiled his 2014 budget proposal that resulted in varied opinions over the retirement-related provisions that could greatly impact the retirement industry. (more…)

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Do You Have to Take a 2012 Required Minimum Distribution?

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013

ACT FAST: Limited Time Offer for RMDs

Thanks to a hot-off-the-presses provision in the new tax law, taxpayers over 70 ½ have a very limited window to address 2012 required minimum distributions (RMDs) from their retirement accounts.

Here’s what happened: an incentive for donating your RMDs directly to charity tax-free expired in 2011, so at the end of 2012 many of you weren’t sure what to do. Some of you may have taken your RMD as usual and used that money toward regular living expenses, but other retirees who typically donate their RMD to charity may have taken a different approach. (more…)

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How Do Your Avoid IRS Penalties on Your IRA?

Friday, September 21st, 2012

With our government requiring more cash each year, there is growing sentiment is the financial community that the IRS is becoming more vigilant in obtaining all revenue available related to Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs). According to a recent article, the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration estimates that the IRS failed to collect as much as $286 million of revenue in 2006 and 2007 alone. From a political aspect, it is easier to raise revenue by simply enforcing the existing rules, than it is to cut spending or pass a new tax increase. (more…)

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Do you know the 2012 Retirement Limits?

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011

Employees and individual retirement plan owners can contribute more toward their retirement benefits next year. (more…)

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So the Grass Wasn’t Greener? Time to Reverse Your Roth IRA Conversion

Tuesday, September 27th, 2011

If you converted a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA account last year, you may be facing an account that is worth much less than when you converted it. But you might also be facing a tax bill on value you no longer have. You do have an option, but only if you act quickly – reverse your 2010 Roth conversion.

If you converted your traditional IRA to a Roth IRA last year, the transaction triggered a taxable distribution from the traditional IRA, followed by a contribution to your Roth account. That tax will be based on the value of the traditional IRA on its conversion date. That means if your account is worth less now, you will owe taxes on money that no longer exists.

How to Reverse Your Roth IRA

Thankfully, the Roth conversion regulations allowed for the ability to reverse the conversion – but only if you do so before October 17. This involves completing the proper paperwork with your IRA custodian or trustee. When properly filed, the IRS considers your account as being “recharacterized” from a Roth account back to traditional IRA status. It’s as if the conversion never happened, and your tax liability disappears.

You’ll need to amend your 2010 tax return to allow for the reversal, or adjust your 2010 return if you have filed for an extension. Your reversal of the Roth conversion this year will also trigger some additional documentation requirements for your 2011 tax return.

Reconverting to Roth

Now that you’ve lessened your tax liability on phantom income that vanished due to the market’s versatility, you might consider using the down market to your advantage. You can reconvert your now traditional IRA back to a Roth – and pay less tax on it than you would have paid last year. You must wait 30 days after the reversal to reconvert it. Reconverting your traditional IRA account to a Roth can make sense if you expect your assets to appreciate quickly.

Your tax professional can assist you in amending your 2010 tax return or adjusting your extended 2010 return. He or she can also walk you through the reporting process that will be required should you decide to reconvert your IRA.

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