Posts Tagged ‘interest rates’

Debt vs. Taxes: Should You Pay Off Your Loan

Friday, October 9th, 2015
Loan Repayment - Ohio CPA Firm

Without the tax deduction, you will pay a little more in income taxes but you will be left with more money in your bank account at the end of the day.

Have you ever heard someone say they couldn’t afford to pay off their loan because they would lose the interest deduction on their tax return?

Although it’s true that the taxpayer will be able to deduct their loan interest at tax time, there’s a lot more to consider – read on to learn more about the tax treatment of loans and interest to identify a repayment strategy that works best for you.

Read Also: Don’t Let Tax Incentives Determine How You Donate

It Is Worth It To Be In Debt?

Let’s assume that you are in the 25 percent tax bracket, which means that for every dollar you pay the bank in interest, the government will give you 25 cents back in tax savings. BUT – you have to remember that you are still out of pocket 75 cents of every dollar you pay the bank in interest. From an overall cash flow standpoint, that doesn’t really sound like a winning strategy to me.

Even though it would be nice to have a tax break to look forward to in the spring, you will ultimately end up paying more over the duration of your repayment period if you choose not to pay your loan off. That being said, if you have the funds available to pay off the principal loan balance you will save yourself the cost of the interest you are being charged by the bank.

Without the tax deduction, you will pay a little more in income taxes but you will be left with more money in your bank account at the end of the day.

Possible Reasons to Hold On To Your Loan

  • Investment Opportunities

Let’s say your loan balance is $50,000. If you have $50,000 of excess funds available to pay off your loan, you may also want to consider what your investment options are if you didn’t pay that loan off. Could you earn a rate of return greater than the interest rate you are paying on your loan? If so, then you may be better off keeping the loan and investing your excess funds.

  • Liquidity

Another consideration is the liquidity. You may have the funds to pay off the loan but you may want to keep a reserve of funds for an emergency or unknown need that may arise. Everyone has their own comfort level when it comes to maintaining an excess supply of cash reserves and your decision may vary whether you are holding on to a home mortgage loan or a business loan. As a business owner, for example, you might find it to be more beneficial to keep the borrowed money readily available to cover any fluctuations pertaining to your company’s equipment or inventory needs. Or you may want to keep a reserve of funds to get through your slow season.

Depending on where you are with your business or personal finances, you’ll want to consider various factors when deciding if you should pay off your mortgage or business loan. If you are only looking at the tax savings, then paying off the loan is likely your best option. However, it may also be important to consider other factors such as alternative investment options and liquidity. If you have questions about paying off your loan, email your Rea advisor.

By Mark Fearon, CPA (New Philadelphia office)

Are you looking for more tips and tax breaks to maintain your financial security? Check out these articles for more tips and advice.

Become A Brank Reconciliation Warrior

Does Your Vacation Home Provide Tax Relief?

The Birth Of The Taxpayer’s Estate

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Don’t Shy Away From Business Debt

Friday, May 22nd, 2015
Leverage Your Debt - Leverage Your Cash Flow - Ohio CPA Firm

Traditionally, companies with strong, positive cash flows are those with proper pricing models in place, a healthy labor force, controlled spending and active collections. When it’s time to grow, they are ready to make a move.

You know the satisfaction you feel when all of your debts have been settled and any extra cash flowing into your bank account is purely disposable income. Neither do I. But, contrary to popular belief, if you are a business owner, carrying a little extra debt could be a good thing – and here’s why …

Read: How Can My Statement of Cash Flows Transform My Business?

One of the most important jobs a business owner has is to prepare, monitor and analyze their company’s cash flow. As the single most important tool you have in your business’s arsenal, your company’s cash flow (business income minus its cash payments) provides you with an accurate way to measure its overall financial wellness.

Do You Know What You Need To Grow?

One of the most powerful ways to measure how well your company is doing is to monitor its projected/forecasted cash flow while analyzing the business’s past financial information.

  • Your company’s projected/forecasted cash flow should provide you an educated prediction of your future cash income and expenses. You can use this information to develop the initiatives needed to ensure the long-term growth and sustainability of your business.
  • When you monitor your company’s past cash flow you will tap into the data needed to zero in on the business’s strengths and weaknesses – effectively shining a light on processes, products, services and strategies that are hindering your company’s growth. Then you can act quickly to build upon the objectives that work and eliminate those that hinder ongoing success.

Traditionally, companies with strong, positive cash flows are those with proper pricing models in place, a healthy labor force, controlled spending and active collections. (Notice that I didn’t say that these companies were debt free!)

Leverage Cash Flow, Leverage Your Debt

The word “debt” has a bad reputation. Yes, for many reasons living your life and managing your business “debt free” can be a great thing. But, especially in business, working exclusively for the purpose of eliminating all debt can actually hinder you from experiencing healthy, sustainable growth. For example, in the quest to settle your company’s debts, you may be left with an anemic savings account and little-to-no cash to jump on opportunities that arise and could potentially propel your company to new heights. As a savvy business owner, you should always anticipate changes that could positively and negatively impact your business. The key is to leverage your company’s cash flow. Here are two ways you can get started.

  1. Take advantage of financing opportunities with favorable interest rates.  

Oftentimes, especially if you have taken the time to develop a strong relationship with a local financial institution, you can secure financing at a very low interest rate. This will allow you to take the cash that was not used to finance your project and reinvest it in the market, which can provide you with a better return. For example, in the current market, if you are able to finance new equipment for your company with an interest rate of 4 percent, you are free to invest your own cash in the market, which could yield a return rate greater than the interest charges you owe to the bank per your financing agreement.

  1. Utilize a line of credit

One of the best ways to invest in your business is to make sure you have the cash on hand that will allow you to take advantage of unforeseen opportunities. It’s hard to predict when a strategic partnership or change in the marketplace can open up a door that had previously remained shut. But when it does, an open line of credit makes seizing the opportunity possible while ensuring that your business’s current operations remain unaffected.

If you practice strategic control over your business, make sure you are giving your cash flow the same attention. To properly leverage your company’s debt you must constantly monitor your cash flow to ensure that these strategies make sense for you. Email Rea & Associates to learn more about leveraging your cash flow and whether it is the best move for your company.

By Dustin Raber, CPA (Millersburg office)

 

Related Articles:

Cash Flow Is King: Where Do You Need To Focus?

Should You Maximize Cash Flow Or Minimize Income Taxes?

How Do You Increase Cash Flow?

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Can you make better use of your business cash?

Friday, January 28th, 2011

Can you make better use of the cash you have on hand for your business? Develop a strategy to get the highest rate of return: 1) calculate a 12 month rolling cash projection to forecast cash deficits and surpluses, and 2) update your daily or weekly cash position to determine the extra cash your business has available. (more…)

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