Posts Tagged ‘income tax’

Governor’s Budget Proposal Makes The Case For Tax Reform

Wednesday, February 11th, 2015
Proposed tax increase on oil and gas production

If the proposed two-year state budget proposal passes, oil and gas produced by horizontal wells will be taxed at a 6.5 percent tax rate for product sold at the wellhead. If sold downstream, a 4.5 percent tax will be applied.

Since it was unveiled last month, Gov. John Kasich’s proposed two-year state budget has many individuals, businesses, school districts, not-for-profit organizations and others scrambling to find out how his proposed tax reform package will affect them. In his recommendation, Gov. Kasich says his proposal seeks to “create more opportunities for each and every Ohioan.” To this end, the budget focuses on four primary objectives:

  1. To ensure that students are ready for college and careers
  2. To help more students get degrees
  3. To cut and reform taxes
  4. To help Ohioans move up and out of poverty and into jobs

To achieve these goals, Gov. Kasich has proposed implementation of several tactics to help fund his $35.5 billion 2016 budget, which is up 15.5 percent over the state’s projected spending in fiscal year 2015. Of those tactics, a slew of tax cuts and increases are central to his budget initiative. The following points address some primary changes Ohioans can expect to see if Gov. Kasich’s 2016-2017 budget plan is approved.

Proposed Tax Cuts

  • A 23 percent across-the-board income tax rate reduction. This proposed cut would drop the top income tax rate to 4.1 percent, the current from 5.33 percent.
  • Business owners of pass-through entities with gross receipts less than $2 million will pay no income tax on their business income.
  • Other Ohio business owners will see the 50 percent reduction incentive on income that totals $250,000 and less become permanent.
  • Individuals who earn less than $40,000 will see a $1,600 increase in their personal exemption (from $2,400 to $4,000). The personal exemption for those who make between $40,000 and $80,000 will increase by $900 (from $1,950 to $2,850).

Proposed Tax Increases

  • The commercial activity tax (CAT), which is measured by a business’s gross receipts on business activities in the state, will increase 0.6 percent to 0.32 percent.
  • The state’s sales tax will increase to 6.25 percent. The current sales tax rate is 5.75 percent and would be expanded to include management consulting, lobbying, market research and opinion polling, public relations, debt collection services, cable subscriptions and parking and travel services.
  • Means-tested tax credits and exemptions for retired taxpayers who earn more than $100,000.
  • Oil and gas produced by horizontal wells will be taxed at a 6.5 percent tax rate for product sold at the wellhead. If sold downstream, a 4.5 percent tax will be applied.
  • The state currently reduces the price paid for the new car or boat by the value of the trade-in. The proposal calls for a 50 percent deduction in this exemption.
  • The discount vendors receive for collecting, reporting and remitting sales tax will be capped at $1,000 per month.

To learn more about how tax reform could affect you, email Rea & Associates.

By Lesley Mast, CPA (Wooster office)

 

 

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Put Your Property Easement Agreement To Work

Tuesday, December 16th, 2014

The shale oil and gas play has spurred a significant amount of pipeline and infrastructure activity throughout certain areas of the United States. As a result, many landowners are now being approached by landmen armed with cash offers and easement agreements in the hopes of acquiring the right to use your property to process and transport oil and gas related products. Before you sign on that dotted line, be sure to seek advice from someone well versed in the complexities of property easements.

Be An Informed Property Owner

You probably want to keep as much money in your bank account as possible. So when it comes to paying your taxes, you probably have no intention of giving the government more than its fair share, right? Did you know that when you enter into certain agreements, such as land easements, you may be able to dictate the type of tax treatment your income receives? The trick is to fully understand the tax consequences of language in the agreement.

The tax treatment of a land easement typically is determined (at least in part) by the easement agreement itself. The easement language will either determine if the agreement is for a permanent (or perpetual) easement period, which is exclusive in nature; or if it’s a temporary easement, which will be effective for a finite period of time.

Understand Your Options

If you enter into a permanent easement agreement, the taxable part of the transaction could qualify for capital gains, which may result in an opportunity to save some money during tax season. If you are able to apply the capital gains tax treatment to the income generated from the land easement contract, as opposed to the ordinary income tax rate, you could stand to see your tax rate that is applied to this income drop by almost half.

  • Capital Gains tax rate = 20 percent
  • Regular Income tax rate = 39.6 percent

On the other hand, if you are looking for another option, which could eliminate current payment of tax all together (defer the tax consequence into the future), you might consider the like-kind exchange tax planning strategy. Like-kind exchange rules require the property that is exchanged and the property that is acquired to be held for productive use or investment purposes.

Agreements that receive like-kind treatment under U.S. Code 1031 may result in the deferral of your taxes being due until well into the future or until you dispose of the property acquired in the like-kind exchange. For this to work, the easement agreement must be considered perpetual or permanent and must also involve real estate that is used as part of your trade or business or that is being held for investment purposes.

Don’t Disqualify Yourself

While the thought of exchanging your land easement for other real estate while deferring your taxes may seem attractive, the process of entering into, and maintaining, a like-kind exchange is very complex and must be strictly adhered to. In other words, you will need to seek out help to navigate the waters. If you would like to see if you qualify for a like-kind exchange, email Rea & Associatesfor more information. And remember to always consult your current financial advisor or another professional well versed in like-kind exchange taxation, before signing any land easement contract. Failure to do so may disqualify you from favorable like-kind exchange treatment.

By Jim Fracker, CPA (Zanesville office)

 

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How Does Getting Divorced Impact Your Taxes?

Friday, March 15th, 2013

Like so many Hollywood couples these days, maybe you are finding yourself a newly divorced person. With all the legal shenanigans that can happen during a divorce proceeding, have you taken the time to consider some of the more practical matters related to your finances? There are several tax-related items and helpful advice tidbits to be discovered after a change in your marital status. (more…)

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How Do You Keep Your Tax Documents Organized?

Friday, January 25th, 2013

It’s mid-January. Statistically, most Americans have already abandoned their New Year’s resolutions – those promises you make to yourself to hit the gym, get more sleep and read your favorite accounting blog every day (hey, it was worth a shot). But if you resolved to be more organized in 2013, don’t give up on it just yet – at least not until April 15.

This tax filing season carries extra challenges, thanks to the late passage of the “Fiscal Cliff” tax laws. The IRS isn’t going to be able to process tax returns until around February 1, which gives us a much smaller window of opportunity.

Follow these tips to stay organized this tax season and hopefully experience a few fewer headaches with Uncle Sam’s name on them. (more…)

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What Does the Fiscal Cliff Deal Mean for You and Your Business?

Friday, January 4th, 2013

By now you’ve heard that last minute actions by Congress and the President pulled us off the brink of the fiscal cliff. But, do you know what the American Taxpayer Relief Act means for you and your business?

Overall, the deal is good news for most Americans. While it’s true that the tax rates for 99 percent of taxpayers will not change, everyone who pays payroll taxes will see a slight increase. Here’s what you, as an individual taxpayer, should expect in the year to come: (more…)

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You Got a Tax Notice… Now What?!

Wednesday, September 19th, 2012

You know the feeling well… you’re just going about your business, walking out to the mailbox to pick up the daily mail. For some reason, the pile feels a bit heavier today. And as you sort through the junk and the magazines and the bills, you find that you’ve received a little love note in the form of a tax notice from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). No wonder the mail is so heavy today… the IRS is looking for more of your well-earned money. (more…)

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What if you can’t pay your taxes?

Friday, April 13th, 2012

The April 17th tax deadline is looming closer and you know that you’ve got to get your payment in soon.  But, what if you don’t have the cash on hand?  Don’t panic, there are ways to file your taxes and avoid penalties – even if you can’t pay everything that you owe right away. (more…)

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Did you send a wedding announcement to Social Security?

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

When you’re newly married, there’s so much to think about.  Did you remember to thank Aunt Joan for that silver tray?  Did you remember to have your mail forwarded to your new address?  One thing that may not make the list: Did you remember to notify the Social Security Administration of your name change? (more…)

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How can you protect yourself from tax fraud?

Friday, March 16th, 2012

Tax identity theft is an increasingly enormous problem. The IRS has been bombarding us with warnings of identity theft and scams this tax season.

Here’s a summary of some of the latest information you should know. (more…)

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Do you have to file taxes for your dependent children?

Tuesday, March 6th, 2012

A question we hear quite often during tax season relates to when it is necessary to file a tax return for a dependent child. Some people think that money held in an account intended for college education is exempt from taxation. That is not the case, unless the account is an Education IRA or Section 529 plan. If the investments are held in a custodial account or held in the child’s individual name, the child is deemed the owner and the income is attributable to him/her. (more…)

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When Can You Expect to Receive Your Tax Refund?

Thursday, February 16th, 2012

If you’re expecting a federal tax refund this year, it could be delayed. The agency reports that new anti-fraud measures could slow the refund process by approximately one week. (more…)

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Is Your Farm a Hobby or a Business?

Friday, February 10th, 2012

Farming is a pleasure activity for some individuals, and for others, it’s how they support themselves. If you farm for profit, how do you prove it to the IRS? (more…)

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How do Disaster Payments, Like Those for the Oil Spill, Impact Your Taxes?

Friday, July 16th, 2010

The IRS recently explained how recipients of payments by BP to oil spill victims for lost income should treat the payments for tax purposes, set up a special tax assistance day and established a special toll-free line for Gulf Coast area taxpayers. (more…)

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