Posts Tagged ‘Form 5500’

Brush Up On These New Tax Form Due Dates

Wednesday, June 29th, 2016
Tax Form Due Dates - Ohio CPA Firm

Want a tip to help you stay out of trouble with the IRS? Start studying up on the new tax form due dates.

Did you know that the IRS has changed the due dates for many of your tax return forms? These changes will be effective for taxable years starting after Dec. 31, 2015, meaning your 2016 tax returns filed next year (2017) will be impacted. Since some due dates have been altered quite a bit and others have not even been touched, it’s incredibly important to pay attention to the changes.

Read Also: Join The Fight Against Identity Theft & Income Tax Fraud

Stay out of trouble with the IRS. Start studying up on the new tax form due dates, below.

  • Form 1065 pertaining to partnerships operating on a calendar year are now due March 15. A six-month extension from that date is allowable. Previously, the due date was April 15. According to the new law, partnership returns are now due on the 15th day of the third month after the year end.
  • Form 1041, which refers to trust and estate taxes, gained a 5½-month extension from the original filing date of April 15. This was an increase of half a month.
  • Your 2016 C Corp tax returns for returns that impact businesses with traditional Dec. 31 and June 30 year-end deadlines will be due on the 15th of the fourth month after the year end. A six-month extension from that date will be allowed.

o   If your year-end is before Jan. 1, 2016, your due date is April 15, with a Sept. 15, extension.

o   If your year-end is after Dec. 31, 2015, your new due date is April 15 with an Oct. 15, extension.

  • For C Corps operating outside a traditional fiscal year end (with fiscal years other than Dec. 31 and June 30), the new due date for your tax return forms is the 15th day of the 4th month after year end and the 15th day of the 10th month after year end.
  • A special rule for C Corps with a June 30 fiscal year end was established and will impact the due date for Form 1120. The new due date will go into effect for returns with taxable years beginning after Dec. 31, 2015 for the 2017 filing season.

o   Before Jan. 1, 2016, Form 1120 is due Sept. 15 with an April 15 extension.

o   After Dec. 31, 2015, the due date for this form is Oct. 15. The April 15 extension date will not change.

  • For exempt organizations required to file Form 990, the new extension date becomes a single, automatic 6-month extension. This eliminates the need to process the current first 90-day extension.
  • Those filing the Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts Report (FBAR) will have to adhere to a new April 15 due date. An Oct. 15 extension date was also established. This report was previously due on June 30.
  • All W-2 and certain 1099-MISC forms are now due to the IRS/SSA no later than Jan. 31, which is the same day they are due to the taxpayer. All other Forms 1099 are due Feb. 28 or, if filed electronically, March 31. This is a change from the Feb. 28 due date (and March 31 date if filed electronically) for all W-2 and 1099 forms that was previously enforced.

For all the changes outlined above, there are a few rules that will remain unchanged. Below are four due dates that will not change in 2017.

  • Form 1120S – These forms are due on March 15 with a six-month extension from the due date.
  • Form 1040 – The individual tax form will continue to be due on April 15 with an Oct. 15 extension date.
  • The due date for Form 5500, concerning employee benefit plans, will not change as a federal law that was enacted in December 2015 effectively repealed a previously enacted extension. These forms are due on July 31 with an Oct. 15 extension due date.
  • Form 3520-A for foreign trusts with a U.S. owner will not be changing. These forms will continue to be due on March 15 with a Sept. 15 extension due date.

Check with your tax advisor to find out if you will be ready to comply with these changes and to ask any tax planning questions you might have. Believe it or not, tax season is closer than you think. Be a proactive business owner. With enough lead time, you can implement a tax savings strategy capable of delivering amazing results. Email Rea & Associates to learn more.

By Lisa Beamer, CPA (New Philadelphia office)

Are you looking for more tax insight? Check out these articles?

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Like Losing Your Wallet – Only Worse

Friday, July 31st, 2015
Retirement Plan Returns- Ohio CPA Firm

Typically, owners of businesses and their spouses who fail to file their annual retirement plan returns are in full-scale crisis mode – and rightfully so, since missing this deadline results in a penalty that’s about the size of a small fortune.

For most of us, misplacing our keys, losing sight of our shoes and occasionally forgetting to pay the phone bill on time is not a catastrophic phenomenon. It happens; and most likely we will freak out for a minute, find what we were looking for and move on – only to repeat our dysfunctional routine countless times over the course of a lifetime. Forgetting to file your retirement plan returns on the other hand … well, let’s just say that’s typically not a stress-free event.

Read Also: Do You Know What Your Retirement Plan Is Costing You?

Typically, owners of businesses and their spouses who fail to file their annual retirement plan returns (Form 5500-EZ) are in full-scale crisis mode – and rightfully so, since missing this deadline results in a penalty that’s about the size of a small fortune. To be more precise, in years past, those who failed to meet their filing obligation could face a penalty totaling up to $15,000 per return. Fortunately, the IRS recently announced that instead of facing such an extreme late fee, eligible business owners can take advantage of a “low-cost penalty relief program.”

How Much Would You Pay?

The relief initiative, which started as a one-year pilot program in 2014, was tremendously successful, resulting in the collection of about 12,000 late returns. Because of this success, the program secured it’s permanency in May of this year. According to the news release, the program allows eligible business owners and their spouses to file late returns and only pay a $500 penalty for each return submitted with a maximum of $1,500 per plan. Because the IRS caps the maximum penalty at $1,500, applicants are encouraged to include multiple late returns in a single submission.


The IRS says that businesses with plans that cover the owner or the business’s partners (depending on how the business is set up) and their spouses are eligible to take advantage of this low-cost plan. Complete information about the program can be found by clicking here.

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Remember, your return must be filed annually no later than the end of the seventh month following the close of your plan year. So, for example, if your plan is governed by the calendar-year, as most are, your 2014 return was due today (Friday, July 31, 2015). Did you fail to file your small business’s annual retirement plan returns? Would you like to find out if you qualify for this program? Email a retirement plan expert at Rea & Associates and take control of your IRS debt now.

By Andrea McLane, QKA (Dublin office)

Want to read more about the importance of Retirement Plan Compliance?
Check out these articles:

401(k) Loans and Keeping Your Plan In Compliance
Retirement Roulette
The ‘Van Halen Philosophy’ of Retirement Plan Compliance

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Want to Lessen Chances of a DOL Inquiry? Ten Tips

Wednesday, September 21st, 2011

The Department of Labor (DOL) enforces fiduciary, reporting and disclosure requirements for employee benefit plans. The agency is recruiting more investigators, so DOL investigations will be on the rise. (more…)

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Should I respond to that DOL Employee Benefit Notice?

Thursday, December 9th, 2010

If your company is required to file the employee benefit plan form 5500 or 5500-EZ, and receives a notice of a proposed penalty, be sure to respond to the notice within 30 days. (more…)

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