Posts Tagged ‘child tax credit’

School’s Out For Summer, But Tax Credits Are Still In

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015

Summer is an exciting time for families. It’s a time to get outside and have fun hanging out by the pool or to catch fireflies in a jar at the end of a long day. For many parents though, the summer holiday is overshadowed by the need to find affordable childcare during your work hours. The good news is that your opportunity to claim the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit doesn’t end at the last day of school. In fact, you may be able to claim a variety of summertime childcare expenses when tax season rolls around again. Check out the list below to familiarize yourself with this credit.

Read: Can My Summer Day Care Expenses Earn A Tax Credit?

8 Tips To Help You Claim The Child Care Tax Credit

  1. Child care must have been provided so that you (and your spouse if filing jointly) can work or actively look for work. Your spouse must also meet this obligation during any month in which the child was a full-time student or was physically and/or mentally incapable of self-care.
  2. You must have earned income. Earned income includes earnings such as wages and self-employment. If you are married filing jointly, your spouse must also have earned income. There’s an exception to this rule for a spouse who is a full-time student or who is physically and/or mentally incapable of self-care.
  3. Care must have been provided for dependent(s) younger than 13 years old. Your spouse or another dependent qualifies if they lived with you for more than have the year and are physically and/or mentally incapable of self-care.
  4. Qualifying child care expenses include those that are used to secure enrollment at a daycare facility outside the home or at a day camp. Expenses for overnight camps or summer school tutoring do not qualify. NOTE: If you pay someone to come to your home to care for your child or children, you may be a household employer. For more information, see IRS Household Employer’s Tax Guide.
  5. If your employer provides dependent care benefits, special rules apply. See Form 2441, Child and Dependent Care Expenses.
  6. The credit is a percentage of the qualified expenses you pay for the care of a qualifying person and can be up to 35 percent of your expenses, depending on your income.
  7. You can claim up to $3,000 of your total unreimbursed expenses you pay in a year for one qualifying person or $6,000 for two or more qualifying persons.
  8. Keep your receipts and records to use when you file your 2015 tax return next year.  Make sure to note the name, address and Social Security number or employer identification number of the care provider. You must report this information when you claim the credit on your return.

Email Rea & Associates to learn more about the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit or other tax incentives you may qualify for.

By Denell Skelton, CPA (Coshocton office)

 

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What Tax Deductions and Credits Have Been Renewed for Individuals?

Monday, December 27th, 2010

Part of the recently passed Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization and Job Creation Act of 2010 has extended many popular deductions and credits for individual taxpayers through 2012.  Many of these are part of the list of tax “extenders” that Congress has temporarily extended (usually at the last minute) for the last several years.  These provisions benefit taxpayers at various income levels. (more…)

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