Posts Tagged ‘business tax’

Business Leaders Turned To Drebit For Fool-Proof Tax Tips

Friday, April 1st, 2016

When it comes to providing readers with top-notch tips and expert financial advice, we take our job very seriously. That’s why our top blog posts in March were related to tax, compliance and general financial wellness topics. Take a look this month’s top five blog posts for business owners.

1. Does The IRS Care About Your Fantasy Football Team?

Fantasy Football | Tax Guidance | Ohio CPA Firm

When you sit down with your CPA to go over last year’s taxable income and they ask you how your fantasy football team did this year, they aren’t just looking to engage you in casual conversation. In fact, how well (or how poorly) you did over the last year might make a difference in the size of your tax bill. Read on to learn more.

 

 

2. Payroll, HR Departments Targeted By Cyber Criminals

paper dollsOver the last few years, the threat of refund fraud and identity theft has become a very real concern, and criminals have proven that they will go to great lengths to get the information they need to complete their scams. This recent phishing scam is no exception.

 

 

 

 

3. The ACA: Small Businesses Are Also At Risk

Small Business Penalties | ACA | Ohio CPA Firm

Thinking the provisions outlined in the Affordable Care Act doesn’t apply to your business because you are “under the threshold of 50 employees” is a very dangerous assumption to make. Keep reading to find out why.

 

 

 

4. Don’t Miss Out! Claim The Work Opportunity Tax Credit

2016 individual mandate penaltiesThe IRS has finally issued guidance on how to deal with the retroactive extension of the Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) for 2015. In short, it’s an opportunity you don’t want to pass up.

 

 

 

 

 

5. Can You Afford To Lose Them?

Recruitment & Staffing Strategy | Ohio CPA Firm

When you lose a member of your team, regardless of their position, you can expect their departure to impact your organization’s bottom line. That’s why it’s so important to take a proactive stance with regard to staffing and minimizing your financial burden.

 

 

 

 

 

April brings an end to the 2016 tax season. Don’t forget that the tax deadline is April 18 this year. Looking ahead, you can expect to see some great tips from our business experts as well as some fantastic spring cleaning advice that can be used to prepare for tax season 2017. And, as always, if you have a question for one of our financial experts or business consultants fill out the Ask Drebit a Question form. We are always happy to provide you with responses to your specific questions.

Happy Spring!

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To Shred Or Not To Shred: That Is The Question … Ask Your Financial Advisor

Monday, October 6th, 2014

Are you wondering what to do with all those tax documents and records you have piling up around your office or in your computer files? Are you thinking about wiping them from your company’s hard drive or sending them to the shredder? Not so fast. The IRS has several rules when it comes to how long your business should keep its records. Make sure you are up to date on the current records retention schedule before you permanently delete something important.

Generally speaking, records that support your income or deduction claims for tax return purposes should be kept until the period of limitations for a particular tax return expires. The “period of limitations” is defined as the period of time the IRS gives you to change information on your return, particularly when the information relates to a refund or credit you have claimed. Also, just because you aren’t planning to make any changes to your tax return doesn’t mean the IRS won’t. Therefore it’s in your best interest to keep your documents until the IRS can no longer assess additional taxes or request additional information from you.

Below is a quick reference guide pertaining to some common records your office has been collecting over the years and how long you should keep them.

Records You Should Keep Permanently:

  • Copyright registration
  • Correspondence (legal and important matters)
  • Deeds, mortgages, bills of sale
  • Depreciation schedules
  • Financial statements (end-of-year)
  • General and private ledgers (and end-of-year trial balances)
  • Insurance records, current accident reports, claims, policies, etc.
  • Minute books for director and stockholder (including bylaws and charter)
  • Property appraisals by outside appraisers
  • Retirement and pension records
  • Tax returns and worksheets, revenue agent’s reports and other documents relating to determination of income tax, sales tax, or payroll tax liability

Records That Should Be Retained For At Least Seven Years:

  • Accident reports and claims (settled cases)
  • Accounts payable/receivable ledgers and schedules
  • Expense analyses and expense distribution schedules
  • Garnishments
  • Inventories of products, materials and supplies
  • Plant cost ledgers
  • Telephone logs/message books
  • Time books/cards
  • Withholding tax statements
  • Employee payroll records (W-2, W-4, annual earnings, etc.)

Records That Can Be Destroyed After Three Years:

  • Bank deposit slips
  • Employment records
  • General correspondence
  • Internal work orders
  • Production and sales reports
  • Sales commission reports

If the records you are looking for aren’t listed above, you can find additional record retention recommendations in our current record retention schedule.

IMPORTANT: The actual amount of time you are required to keep a specific document may be longer depending on your business or what is contained in the document. If you have questions about specific documents or would like some advice on your current record retention practices, email Rea & Associates.

Author: Joe Popp, JD, LLM (Dublin office)

 

Related Articles:

How Do You Keep Your Tax Documents Organized?

Getting Back To Business: How Outsourcing May Provide Relief To Your Business

How Can You Best Prepare For The Upcoming Tax Season?

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The Do’s and Don’ts of Summertime Tax Prep

Thursday, August 7th, 2014

It’s the beginning of August and you’re probably not keeping yourself up at night thinking about your taxes. Frankly, who has time to think about itemized deductions and tax-free distributions when you would rather be grilling out, soaking in the sun, or enjoying your family vacation? April 15, 2015, may be more than 260 days away, but now is a great time to look at your taxes and make necessary adjustments to effectively sidestep any potential problems that might cause problems when tax season does arrive.

Consider These Tax Prep Do’s and Don’ts

  • Don’t assume that filing your taxes will be the same as the year before. More than 50 tax provisions expired on Dec. 31.
  • Do make yourself aware of any changes that have occurred since last tax season. Click here to view the most up-to-date list. Some of the most common expired provisions include:
    • Itemized deduction for state and local general sales tax
    • Itemized deduction for mortgage insurance premiums (PMI)
    • Tax-free distributions from individual retirement plans for charitable purposes
    • 50 percent accelerated tax depreciation (“Bonus depreciation”).
    • Increased expensing. (This provision allows businesses to deduct the full purchase price of qualified equipment.) Current 2014 provisions are $25,000 deduction with a $200,000 limitation on purchases.
  • Do take time to manage your files. It’s much more manageable to file six months’ worth of receipts vs. a whole years’ worth in January. Are you looking for inspiration? Now is a good time to start organizing medical and charitable contribution receipts.
  • Do make a note as to whether the size of your household changed.
  • Don’t forget to review your withholdings. Did you receive a large refund in 2013? Did you owe the IRS in April? To adjust your withholdings, speak with your payroll representative and complete a new W-4.
  • Do send your estimated payments for income to the IRS every quarter to avoid charges and penalties for underpayments. If you forgot to make a payment or you underpaid in April or June, don’t worry. There’s still time to catch up on your September and January payments.
  • Don’t underestimate the short-term value of retirement contributions. Aside from the long-term savings benefits, many retirement accounts are a great tax deferral. If you are participating and not maxing out, consider increasing your contribution. Contributions to a Traditional IRA are another consideration.
  • Do set aside some time to review your health insurance situation. Alternatively, if you did not maintain health care coverage (and were not exempted) you will owe a penalty with your 2014 1040.
  • Do confirm that you comply with the new repair/capitalization regulations.

Tax Prep Help

A few minutes of work and organization now could save you some major headaches in April. Don’t miss out on your opportunity to jump start your tax prep. Want more tax prep tips? Contact Rea & Associates. Our team of Ohio tax professionals can help you determine what you need to do now to ensure tax time goes smoothly for you.

By: Trista Acker, CPA, CFP (Dublin office)

 

Want more tax prep tips? Check these blog posts out:

What Should You Do After Tax Season?

How Can A Small Business Owner Keep More Money In Their Pocket?

So Is It a Tax Credit Or a Tax Deduction?

 

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What Should You Do After Tax Season?

Monday, April 14th, 2014

Now that most of you have either filed your 2013 tax return or at least gathered your tax information and sent it off to your CPA, I know what you’re thinking. Phew! I’m done with my taxes for yet another year! But guess what? No, you aren’t!

Now is the time to start planning for next year. The sooner you plan ahead and strategize for next year’s tax season, the better off you may be. Not happy with the amount of taxes that you had to pay this past year? Not happy that you seem to work harder and harder only to pay more in taxes and get further behind? Start planning now for future tax seasons!

Tax Planning For the Future

Here are a few things you can start working on now to help create a better tax experience for yourself next year:

  • Develop an investment strategy. Most people don’t understand the affect this can have on your tax return. You can control when and how to take gains from your investments. You should work on developing a long-term investment strategy with your investment advisor.
  • Create a plan to sell property. Are you considering selling property sometime in the future? Did you know that there are ways to minimize taxes that need to be paid on the sale of property? This isn’t done by calling your financial advisor and letting them know you just sold some property. Get them involved now and discuss that you plan to sell some property in three to five years. Your financial advisor can help you structure the property sale and ultimately help you control the tax effect.
  • Establish a business plan. If you’re thinking about starting a new business, work with your financial advisor now to determine what tax savings you may be able to realize. Depending on the type of entity there could be significant tax savings down the road. 

Tax Planning Help

While there’s no single quick fix to solving all of your business and tax woes, planning now will certainly help you when tax season rolls around next year – and the year after that and so on. If you need help with your tax planning, contact Rea & Associates. Our team of Ohio tax planning professionals can help you develop a tax strategy that best suits you for years to come.

Author: Dave McCarthy, CPA, CSEP (Medina office)

 

Want to read some more articles related to tax planning? Check these posts out?

What Is The Difference Between Fixed Asset Expensing And Capitalization?

So Is It a Tax Credit Or a Tax Deduction?

How Will A Tax Credits and Incentives Plan Benefit Your Business?

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What Does the Fiscal Cliff Deal Mean for You and Your Business?

Friday, January 4th, 2013

By now you’ve heard that last minute actions by Congress and the President pulled us off the brink of the fiscal cliff. But, do you know what the American Taxpayer Relief Act means for you and your business?

Overall, the deal is good news for most Americans. While it’s true that the tax rates for 99 percent of taxpayers will not change, everyone who pays payroll taxes will see a slight increase. Here’s what you, as an individual taxpayer, should expect in the year to come: (more…)

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How Does the IRS Treat Property Repair Expenses?

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

Tax treatment of property repairs has long frustrated business owners and accountants alike. The system has been confusing, hard to follow and seemingly eternally inconsistent. Recent changes to the Internal Revenue Code have streamlined the treatments of property repairs, but not all the changes are as taxpayer-friendly as you may have hoped. (more…)

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