Posts Tagged ‘401(k)’

Don’t Let These Common Retirement Plan Mistakes Hurt Your Business

Monday, March 28th, 2016
Administrative Mistakes | Retirement Plan Sponsors | Ohio CPA Firm

Even data entry gurus aren’t immune to making mistakes and, as many of us are already aware, it only takes a minor slip up to cause major havoc – especially where your plan contribution records are concerned. Read on to discover some common administrative mistakes retirement plan sponsors should know about and how to avoid them moving forward.

When it comes to saving for retirement, your employees trust you to help them get their finances in order. Don’t undermine their trust by making mistakes that could have been easily avoided. Instead, take a proactive approach to the administrative responsibilities you are expected to manage. Keep reading to discover three areas retirement plan auditors are checking for mistakes and what you can do to avoid future issues.


Pay close attention to your plan’s eligibility requirements. The enrollment dates for some employees can get confusing. Consider the following example.

According to your plan document, in order for an employee to enroll in your company’s retirement plan, they must be at least 21-years-old and have had worked for you for at least six consecutive months. Once they have met these requirements, they can enroll during the plan’s entry dates, which fall on the first day of each quarter.

Considering this scenario, on what day will you be able to enroll “John” into your company’s retirement plan if:

  • He was hired March 17, 2016
  • His birthday is Oct. 25, 1995

While it’s true that John will meet the 6-month employment requirement on Sept. 17, he’s unable to meet the age requirement. When he turns 21 on Oct. 25, he will still have to wait until the first day of the next quarter – Jan. 1, 2017.

If an employee misses the opportunity to participate as a result of an error made by the plan sponsor, the employer is required to correct the mistake by making a corrective contribution.

This common mistake can easily be avoided as long as your business has solid processes in place to determine the appropriate for all new employees who are choosing to enter into the plan.


Even data entry gurus aren’t immune to making mistakes and, as many of us are already aware, it only takes a minor slipup to cause major havoc – especially where your plan contribution records are concerned.

When you manually enter your employee’s retirement plan contributions, you become vulnerable to data entry errors. It’s not uncommon for a wrong keystroke to lead to deposits being made into the wrong employee’s account, for example.

Fortunately, this mistake is easily avoidable if you take steps toward automation. Ask your payroll company if they can create a file that can be easily uploaded to your retirement plan’s record keeper in an automated format and save yourself any future data entry headaches.


It’s very important to be clear about what your plan document considers to be compensation. For example, if your plan document makes a point to reference “W-2 compensation,” you are required to withhold retirement plan funds from all regular wages, bonuses, commission, overtime, etc. This means, that if you pass out performance bonuses and neglect to withhold their 401(k) contribution, your document has failed and your business is opened to unpleasant consequences.

Fortunately, it’s not too late. Your plan document most likely offers the flexibility to make a separate plan election on bonuses. If your employee does decide to elect a portion of their bonus to the plan, ask them to document the election request for your records as well as their own.

Mistakes happen, but you can minimize the chance of making some pretty major mistakes simply by adopting a more proactive management style. The tips above will certainly help you get started. But for even more, email Rea & Associates today.

By Steve Renner, QKA (New Philadelphia office)

Get more retirement plan advice for your business. Check out these articles:

How Your Plan Design Can Help Improve Your Retirement Plan Participation

13 Fees That Can Kill Your Retirement Plans

Retirement Plan Participants Are Content To Watch Their Savings Simmer

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Six Things 401k Plan Sponsors Need To Do Now

Friday, January 16th, 2015
2015 Retirement Plan Deadlines - Ohio CPA Firm

Mark your calendars and don’t forget these 2015 retirement plan deadlines. Click on the image to easily see what is due and when to file.

January may be flying by, but the New Year is still fresh. This is still a great time to make sure that the qualified 401k plan you offer your employees helps them effectively save for retirement and remains qualified. Not sure where to start? Here are six ways to get the most out of your 401k plan:

1. Review Your Match Formula

An employer match can be critical to helping your employees meet their retirement goals and stretching the match formula is a great way to entice employees to save more. Instead of matching 100 percent on the first 2 percent of deferrals, consider changing your contribution formula to 50 percent on the first 4 percent of deferrals, or 25 percent on the first 8 percent of deferrals instead. Each one of these formulas will result in a 2 percent wage cost to you, the employer, but changing the formula may encourage additional employee saving. Instead of saving 4 percent of their income (2 percent employee income plus 2 percent employer match), the employee may be motivated to increase contributions to their retirement plan to 10 percent (8 percent employee income plus 2 percent employer match). Contact your TPA to discuss different strategies.

2. Check Your Contribution Limits

Did you know that the 401(k) and 403(b) plan deferral limits have increased to $18,000? Employees older than 50, now have the option to defer an additional $6,000 of their wages toward retirement. Encourage your employees to review their payroll deduction to ensure that they are on target to meet their personal savings goals.

3. Offer Your 401(k) Plan To All Eligible Employees

If your 401(k) plan has an entry date of Jan. 1, be sure all newly eligible employees were provided the opportunity to participate in the plan. Even if you have an employee who doesn’t want to participate, I recommend that you obtain a signed election form that indicates a 401(k) election of “0 percent.” By doing this, you have documentation that they employee was offered the chance to participate, even though they decided not to.

4. Provide Employee Census To Your TPA

Your third party administrator (TPA) needs yearly plan census information to conduct compliance testing, verify 401(k) and to calculate matching contributions and profit sharing allocations. The deadline for most compliance tests is March 15.

5. Check Your Fidelity Bond

The Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) requires a fidelity bond for every plan fiduciary and for those who handle the funds or property of a plan. The bond must be at least 10 percent of the company’s plan assets. It’s a good idea to ensure that your bond is still meeting the 10 percent minimum requirement.

6. Restate Your Plan Document

Prototype documents for 401(k) plans currently are in a restatement window; therefore, if your plan uses a prototype document, it must be updated to meet new IRS standards. This document restatement period is a great time to examine your plan provisions. For example, do you want to change eligibility requirements or add a loan provision that you have contemplated adding in the past? This is a good time to make those changes. The deadline for restating 401(k) prototype documents is April 30, 2016. Managing your company’s retirement plan can be confusing or overwhelming at times, but it doesn’t have to be. Email Rea & Associates today to learn more. By Steve Renner, QKA (New Philadelphia office)

Related Articles

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What Should Plan Sponsors Ask Their Investment Advisors?

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Save More For Retirement in 2015

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

As you work to secure your retirement, you may be pleased to find out about changes to several retirement-related items that may allow you to put a little more cash away in 2015. In October, the IRS announced several adjustments to the limitations previously set on retirement planning tools as a result of an increased cost-of-living. So what does that mean to you and your retirement plan(s) of choice? Take a look:

  • If you contribute to a 401(k), 403(b), 457 plan or a Thrift Savings Plan, the following changes could impact how you contribute:

-        You can now invest up to $18,000 annually – this is an increase up from $17,500.

-        If you’re 50 years old or older and are trying to catch-up on your retirement savings, you may now invest $6,000 annually. The previous catch-up contribution limit was $5,500.

  • If you contribute to an individual retirement account (IRA), you will see the following changes in 2015:

-        The annual limit and additional catch-up contribution limit for an IRA for individuals 50 years old and older will not change in 2015. The annual contribution is $5,500 and the catch-up contribution is $1,000.

-        Single filers and heads of household who are covered by a workplace retirement plan and have adjusted gross incomes (AGI) between $61,000 and $71,000 will no longer be eligible to receive a deduction for contributing to their traditional IRA. This has increased from $60,000 and $70,000 in 2014.

-        Married couples who file jointly, where one spouse makes an IRA contribution that is covered by a workplace retirement plan, will see an increased income phase-out range for taking the deduction as well. The new range is $98,000-$118,000 – up from $96,000-$116,000.

-        If you’re an IRA contributor, not covered by a workplace retirement plan, but are married to someone who is covered, the deduction is phased out if you and your spouse’s income falls between $183,000 and $193,000 – up from $181,000 and $191,000.

-        The phase-out range for a married taxpayer who files a separate return and who is covered by a workplace retirement plan will not change in 2015. The range remains $0 to $10,000.

  • If you make contributions to a Roth IRA, you will see the following changes:

-        The phase-out range for married couples filing jointly is $183,000 to $193,000 – an increase from $181,000 to $191,000.

-        The phase-out range for single filers and heads of household is $116,000 to $131,000 – an increase from $114,000 to $129,000.

-        The phase-out range for a married individual who files a separate return is unchanged.

As we approach the end of the year, there’s not a better time to evaluate your current retirement plan situation and determine if you need to make any changes for 2015. To learn more about how these retirement plan changes could impact your financial situation, email Rea & Associates.

By Paul McEwan, CPA, MT, AIFA (New Philadelphia office)


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Retirement Is Knocking … Are You Ready To Answer The Door?

What Are Ways You Can Ensure You’re Ready For Retirement? 

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What You Should Know Before Dipping Into Your 401(k)

Friday, May 16th, 2014

Got a 401(k) plan? Have you ever withdrawn money from your 401(k) account? If so, you’re part of the growing number of Americans using their 401(k) accounts to fund other areas of their lives. A recent Bloomberg article explains that more and more Americans are turning to their 401(k) accounts rather than to other means, such as a loan, to help cover any unexpected financial needs that come up.

Historically, Americans have used their homes as a source of additional money. According to the article, when home values rose, homeowners refinanced or took out second mortgages. But due to the housing collapse back in 2008, many homeowners don’t have these options anymore – so they turned to their 401(k) accounts. What many people don’t realize is that depending on their 401(k) plan, they could be penalized for either taking an early withdrawal and/or not putting that money back into their account in the appropriate amount of time.

Shocking 401(k) Withdrawal Statistics

The Bloomberg article cites an IRS report that states the agency collected $5.7 billion in withdrawal penalties in 2011. In other words, Americans withdrew nearly $57 billion from their retirement accounts. That’s $5.7 billion that the IRS would otherwise not have banked on receiving. And what’s the federal government doing with this “extra” income? Funding federal agencies and projects.

Think Before You Dip

Before you turn to your retirement plan for help, you should be aware of some things. It may seem like an easy option, but the IRS actually has some rules that you have to meet before taking money from your 401(k). One of the following conditions must occur before you can take money out without being penalized:

  • You lose your job
  • You claim disability
  • You or your spouse dies
  • You turn 59 ½ years old

401(k) Withdrawal Based on Financial Hardship

If you don’t meet the criteria listed above, but are facing a financial hardship, you may also be able to take an early withdrawal from your retirement account. The IRS’ hardship rules require you have one of the following needs to qualify for a hardship withdrawal:

  • Medical expenses for you or your immediate family
  • Financial assistance in the purchase of your primary residence (this excludes mortgage payments)
  • Tuition or other educational fees (maximum of 12 months) for you or your immediate family
  • Prevent the eviction of you from your primary place of residence
  • Burial or funeral expenses for deceased parent, spouse or other immediate family member
  • Expenses for the repair of damage to your principal residence

The amount of money you take can’t be more than the amount you actually need to cover your hardship. It’s important to note that your early withdrawal due to a financial hardship is subject to state and federal taxes, and is also subject to a 10 percent early withdrawal penalty if you are under age 59 ½. So keep all of these considerations in mind when deciding whether to dip into your retirement account.

401(k) Withdrawal Help

If you’re not sure if a retirement withdrawal is the best route to go, contact Rea & Associates. Our team of Ohio retirement plan services professionals can help you determine if you’re eligible and what you need to do to minimize your tax liability from a withdrawal.

Author: Steve Renner, QKA (New Philadelphia office)


Looking for more information related to 401(k) or retirement plan withdrawals? Check out these blog posts:

Will I Be Penalized for a Hardship 401(k) Withdrawal?

Raiding Your 401(k)? It’ll Cost You

What Are The Rules For Taking A Distribution from My 401(k) Plan?


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Retirement Is Knocking … Are You Ready To Answer The Door?

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

Traveling to exotic places. Spending hours on the links. Enjoying time with the grandkids. Supporting philanthropic efforts. While these all might be things you hope to do during retirement, do you have any idea the likelihood that you’ll actually get to do them? Sadly, more and more individuals are finding that they’re not adequately prepared for retirement. According to the Employee Benefit Research Institute’s (EBRI’s) March 2013 Retirement Confidence Survey, 49 percent of individuals surveyed are “not very confident” or “not at all confident” that they’ll have enough income when they hit retirement. That’s an astounding, yet insightful number. How would you answer the question, “How confident are you that you’re prepared for retirement?” If you find yourself in either of the categories mentioned above, all hope is not lost.

For many of you, retirement probably seems light years away. But there may be some of you who are fast approaching retirement age. Wherever you’re at on the retirement spectrum there are practices you can put in place now to move you toward your retirement goals.

Five Practical Tips for Retirement Readiness       

  1. Look at your ability to save and cut corners where you can to save money. Even if your savings goal seems beyond reach or too distant in the future to be of concern now, re-evaluate where you can save and strive for it. Some individuals won’t begin to save if they see the goal as unattainable and set themselves up for failure before they even begin. Just as a tiny grain of sand can form into a pearl within an oyster over time, small steps in saving for retirement can lead you to your goals. Take responsibility to make it happen, and get financial advice if you need some help.
  2. Determine what you expect your retirement lifestyle to look like. If you dream or envision traveling to those exotic places I mentioned earlier, or perhaps you want to buy a motor home and travel the United States, it’s critical that you have the funds to do it. In theory it sounds like a great idea, but what many people realize upon retirement is that they don’t have enough funds to support these kinds of adventurous or carefree lifestyles. The EBRI survey cited above also showed that seven out of 10 individuals haven’t talked with a financial advisor about their financial situation nor have they put together a plan for retirement. If you want to have a retirement that’s close to what you dream of, put a realistic plan together for what you expect retirement to look like and go after it to make it happen.
  3. Evaluate your debt. Have you purchased a new car? Is your mortgage paid off? Are you (or are you planning on) paying for your kids’ college education? As you prepare for retirement, it’s important you evaluate your debt situation. Ideally, you don’t want to go into retirement with any debt. Work hard now to pay off debt you may have. It’ll pay off (literally and figuratively) later on down the road!
  4. Consider what monetary resources you have to pull from. There’s a whole slew of ways you can fund your retirement. Make certain you are taking advantage of any retirement plan your employer offers. Not only does this give you the ability to save for retirement, but many employers will also contribute money for you – do your best to take full advantage of the contribution your employer will make for you. Personal savings and other avenues, such as an Individual Retirement Account (IRA) or investment in property, could be considered. Social security benefits can also be factored in as part of your retirement benefits, but should not be viewed as the only or primary source of retirement income.
  5. Anticipate medical costs and needs. You may feel fit as a fiddle. But unfortunately for many of us, that feeling won’t last our entire lives. As we get older, our bodies age, and it’s important for us to prepare financially for any potential medical costs or needs we could encounter. Medical costs are one of the more commonly overlooked items when planning for retirement. Knowing your family’s medical history could be helpful when anticipating your future medical costs. 

Retirement Planning Help

While these five tips won’t completely solve all of your retirement woes, they’ll help you get in better shape for retirement. Don’t wait until it’s too late. To celebrate National Employee Benefits Day, which is today, start preparing for the retirement of your dreams today. If you need guidance or additional insight on how to best plan for your retirement, contact Rea & Associates. Our team of Ohio tax professionals can help you put together a plan to ensure you’re on a good path to retirement.

Author: Darlene Finzer, CPA, QKA, CSA (New Philadelphia office) 


Looking for more advice on retirement planning? Check out these posts:

What Are Ways You Can Ensure You’re Ready for Retirement?

Will You Be Ready for Retirement?

What Are The Rules For Taking A Distribution from My 401(k) Plan?


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Why Should You Review Your Retirement Plan Documents Now?

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

“If it’s not broken, don’t fix it.” A lot of people adhere to this philosophy, but in some cases, a review of how something works is not only helpful, it is required. If a business’s retirement plan seems to be working fine, and there doesn’t appear to be anything out of place, many employers believe there is no reason to review the provisions of the plan. This may be the case for a plan that was recently established, but it is always a good idea to review provisions every few years to ensure the plan is still meeting the goals of both the employer and its’ employees.  (more…)

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What Should Plan Sponsors Ask Their Investment Advisors?

Wednesday, February 12th, 2014

Like many business owners, running your business every day is a top priority for you. But as a sponsor of a 401(k) plan, you have an obligation to your employees to make your plan a priority as well. The truth is, most business owners are not 401(k) experts. Therefore, working with a quality 401(k) investment advisor should also be a priority. As a plan sponsor, there are questions you should be asking your advisor to ensure they are helping your meet your fiduciary obligations as the plan sponsor.  (more…)

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What Are The Rules For Taking A Distribution from My 401(k) Plan?

Monday, August 12th, 2013

So maybe you’ve been storing up money in your 401(k) plan for years, possibly even decades. Or maybe you’ve just started paying into your 401(k), and have a little bit of money in your account. You suddenly find yourself in a situation where you need money… and you need it now. What do you do? (more…)

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Part 2 | What Happens if My 401(k) Plan is Out of Compliance with an IRS or DOL Rule?

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013

In the last issue of Illuminations, you read about some initial consequences you may face if you find that your 401(k) plan is out of compliance with an IRS or DOL rule. In this week’s issue, check out the second part of the article that explains the statute of limitations and how you can work to rectify any issues you may have with your business’s retirement plan. To refresh your memory, you can read the first part of the article here(more…)

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What Happens if My 401(k) Plan is Out of Compliance with an IRS or DOL Rule?

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2013

With all of the rules in the business world, it sometimes can be difficult to know and understand all of the rules we need to follow – there are a lot of them. So what happens if you find yourself in an unintended situation where your business’s 401(k) plan is out of compliance? Simply put, a plan out of compliance with Internal Revenue Service (IRS) or Department of Labor (DOL) rules is subject to disqualification. But what does that mean? It is very important that you fix any compliance issues when they are identified – whether they are document-related issues, government reporting issues (5500) or plan operational issues. (more…)

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How Can Retirement Provisions in the President’s 2014 Budget Proposal Affect You?

Thursday, April 25th, 2013

The past few weeks have been full of high visibility news stories ranging from the tragic Boston Marathon bombing to the devastating plant explosion in West, Texas. Amidst these stories and others, there was one important story you may have missed that could affect you and your retirement in a very significant way. President Obama recently unveiled his 2014 budget proposal that resulted in varied opinions over the retirement-related provisions that could greatly impact the retirement industry. (more…)

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Do You Need to Send an Annual Notice to Your 401k Participants?

Friday, November 2nd, 2012

Does your 401k plan have a calendar year end? If so you have until December 1, 2012, to send notice requirements to plan participants or the operation or qualification of your plan could be impacted. Use this checklist of notices to get started: (more…)

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You’ve Received Fee Disclosures, Now What?

Thursday, August 23rd, 2012

It’s Your Turn to Disclose Fees to Participants

Did you suffer from sticker shock when you received the recent fee disclosures from your service providers? If so, you weren’t the only plan fiduciary to be surprised, even though it’s your job to know the ins and outs of your pension plan.

Now, by August 30, you have to disclose that fee information to your plan participants. How do you think they will react? It is possible they aren’t going to like the news. Worse yet, they may be confused as to why they are suddenly paying new fees when the reality is they have always paid them. Being upfront about plan costs, and plan benefits, can help you make it through this new disclosure requirement. (more…)

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What is a Roth 401(k)?

Thursday, June 21st, 2012

Understanding Employee Benefit Plan Types

In 2001, a new retirement plan option was created.  Although this option, known as a Roth 401(k), has been around for a few years now, there’s still some confusion about how it works and what makes it different from a traditional 401(k).  As a plan sponsor, you need to understand the Roth 401 (k) and its benefits so that you can be sure that you’re offering the right retirement plan options to your employees. (more…)

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Do You Understand the New ERISA Fee Disclosures?

Wednesday, June 13th, 2012

408(b)(2) Regulations Help Meet Fiduciary Responsibilities

Are you wondering why there is so much buzz these days about ERISA Section 408(b)(2) fee disclosures? After all, your service provider tells you what you pay for the services provided, right? Maybe.

Service provider pricing and compensation can be structured many different ways, so it may prove difficult for you, a responsible plan fiduciary (RPF), to evaluate plan fees. The Department of Labor (DOL) recognizes this and, in  408(b)(2) regulations, is mandating what information is to be disclosed to help you assess the reasonableness of fees paid for by the plan. The regulations also aim to help identify conflicts of interest that may impact a service provider’s performance. (more…)

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What does the new ERISA regulation mean for plan sponsors?

Friday, March 30th, 2012

If your company sponsors a 401k plan, a new ERISA regulation could mean extra paperwork… and potentially extra liability. (more…)

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Will I Be Penalized for a Hardship 401K Withdrawal?

Monday, October 17th, 2011

A reader asked: I wanted to do a hardship with my 401k and was wondering if would be penalized 10 percent of the balance? I borrowed from my 401k and haven’t paid all of it back yet. Will I be able to do a hardship with remaining balance left? (more…)

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Want to Lessen Chances of a DOL Inquiry? Ten Tips

Wednesday, September 21st, 2011

The Department of Labor (DOL) enforces fiduciary, reporting and disclosure requirements for employee benefit plans. The agency is recruiting more investigators, so DOL investigations will be on the rise. (more…)

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Employees on the Fence? Ten Reasons to Join Your Ohio 401(k)

Tuesday, June 7th, 2011

In spite of recent history in the stock market, when you compare 401(k) plans to other savings plans available to employees, the 401(k) plan has many positive points. Here are ten reasons your employees should participate. (more…)

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Raiding Your 401K? It’ll Cost You

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

A recent study by Bankrate found that nearly one-fifth of full-time employed Americans have raided their retirement accounts in the past year to cover emergency expenses. These results match a Fidelity Investments study last year that reported the number of workers borrowing against their retirement accounts had reached a 10-year high. Given the financial stress that many workers face today, the numbers are not that surprising, but the long-term consequences can be. (more…)

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Looking at Target Date Retirement Funds? Here Are Some Considerations

Monday, April 18th, 2011

Does your company provide target date funds as an option in its 401(k) plan?  Many 401(k) plans use them as the default investment for plan participants who do not select their investments under the plan. Target date funds do make investing much easier for participants by automating the asset allocation process, but they still require careful consideration both before and after the investment decision is made. (more…)

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Add $1,000 to retirement account without sacrifice? Here’s how

Tuesday, February 8th, 2011

A provision of the Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization and Job Creation Act of 2010 decreased the employee portion of the Social Security tax from 6.2 percent to 4.2 percent for 2011. Now you have a rare opportunity for to increase your 401(k) contribution without any change in your net take-home pay in 2011 when compared to 2010. (more…)

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Can I still do an IRA rollover to charity for my 2010 taxes?

Tuesday, January 11th, 2011

As part of the recently passed tax extensions, Congress extended, once again, the popular IRA rollover to charity provision – but with a twist. (more…)

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Donating to Charity from Your IRA? Seniors Get 2010 Deadline Extension

Friday, January 7th, 2011

As part of the recently passed tax extensions, Congress extended, once again, the popular IRA rollover to charity provision – but with a twist. (more…)

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How can you help your employees save for retirement?

Monday, November 29th, 2010

Although a higher percent of American workers are participating in employer-sponsored retirement plans, retirees may still not be saving enough for their retirement and may risk outliving their retirement assets. More individuals are also withdrawing retirement savings before they actually retire. Those are the findings in a report recently released by the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA). (more…)

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What are the 2011 Pension Plan Contribution Limits?

Friday, November 12th, 2010

The IRS recently announced cost of living adjustments affecting dollar limits for pension plans and other retirement-related items for 2011. The limits generally remain unchanged or reflect small inflation adjustments. Here are the highlights: (more…)

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How does the Small Business Jobs Bill Impact 401(k) Plans?

Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010

The Small Business Jobs Bill, which was recently signed into law by President Obama, includes a provision that will add some additional planning opportunities for participants of 401(k) plans with Roth provisions.  Roth IRA accounts are after-tax monies that grow tax-free.  Distributions from the accounts can be made without any tax consequence.  This provides additional flexibility to taxpayers when planning for retirement or death transfers.  One of the main estate planning benefits of Roth IRA accounts is that the minimum required distribution provisions do not apply to them. (more…)

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Are you ready for National Save for Retirement Week?

Monday, October 11th, 2010

Urgent Message from Your Future: Save Today for Tomorrow

When it comes to saving for retirement, there is never a better time than today to assess your prospects toward meeting your goals. And with our nation’s leaders declaring Oct. 17 through Oct. 23 as National Save for Retirement Week, you have a great opportunity. (more…)

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Do You Auto-Enroll Employees in Your 401k?

Wednesday, July 28th, 2010

Large employers are hesitant to institute automatic enrollment for their retirement savings plans, according to a recent survey conducted by AARP. Nearly 60 percent of the employers surveyed noted that they did not have automatic enrollment in the 401(k) plans. (more…)

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Is your 401K Okay? Tips for managing your company retirement plan

Wednesday, June 23rd, 2010

The past several months have certainly been rocky for 401k investors. And while the rollercoaster ride may not be over, the stock market appears to be showing signs of improvement. So what can your business do now that the comeback is underway? (more…)

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Does the new DB(k) retirement plan make sense for my business?

Monday, June 21st, 2010

Beginning January 1, 2010, businesses with 500 or fewer employees could offer a new plan called a DB(k). The DB(k) was authorized by Congress as part of the 2006 Pension Protection Act. The DB(k) melds a 401(k) savings plan with a small guaranteed income stream.  The key elements of the plan: (more…)

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