How will the Small Business Lending Act impact my business?

Christopher Axene | October 5th, 2010

Small Business Lending Funding Act Establishes Four Lending Programs

When President Obama signed into law last week the Small Business Jobs and Credit Act of 2010, the new law created a $30 billion lending fund that will allow the U.S. Department of Treasury to invest in small to medium-sized financial institutions that will in turn be encouraged to increase small business lending. Here is a breakdown of the four lending initiatives established by the law.

Small Business Lending Fund. Administered by the U.S. Treasury, the Small Business Lending Fund will award a capital investment to eligible banks with assets under $10 billion. The banks can receive up to a small percentage of their risk-weighted assets, and receive essentially an incentive loan that must be repaid within 10 years. The banks must lend additional funds to small businesses as well as appropriate advertising. The fund also includes a pilot program that will allow non-profit intermediaries to make loans to small businesses at 1 percent interest over a 20-year term. The non-profit intermediaries can loan up to $200,000 per small business through the pilot program.

State Small Business Credit Initiative. A seven-year State Small Business Credit Initiative will be administered by the U.S. Treasury. Treasury will allocate federal funds to participating states with capital access programs. States can qualify for the funds by demonstrating that their capital access programs meet performance and eligibility requirements, including access to capital for businesses with less than 500 employees, minority-owned businesses and those in underserved communities. New programs can also qualify for the federal funds.

Small Business Early Stage Investment Program. The new law amends the Small Business Investment Act of 1958 to establish an early-stage investment program to provide equity investment financing for early-stage small businesses. The program will be managed by the administrator of the Small Business Administration.

Small Business Borrower Assistance Program. Also as part of the Small Business Jobs and Credit Act of 2010, the Small Business Administration is directed to implement an assistance program that provides payments to lenders of principle and interest on qualifying guaranteed business loans of up to $300,000. Every borrower receiving a qualifying small business loan will be automatically enrolled in the program unless the borrower opts out. The SBA’s administrator is required to commit an amount to each borrower equal to 6 percent of the principle disbursed amount of the borrower’s qualifying loan.

The Small Business Jobs and Credit Act of 2010 also contains roughly $12 million in tax breaks and incentives. We will be reporting on the various tax implications of the new law in the weeks to come.

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