Malware Threat Spreads To Smart Phones

Joe Welker | September 16th, 2015
Malware Goes Mobile  Ohio CPA Firm

According to the digital media analytics company comScore, between the months of December and March 2015, more than 187.5 million people in the U.S. owned smartphones. During that time, Google Android led the pack as the number one smartphone platform with 52.4 percent platform market share. In other words … that’s a lot of potential LockerPIN victims.

Would You Pay A Hacker’s Ransom If Your Phone’s Data Was At Risk?

Researchers and IT security experts from ESET, a global IT security company, recently announced that they had discovered a malware application that is designed to encrypt files and change PINs on Android devices in the United States. In return, victims are demanded to pay up to the tune of $500. Only then will hackers provide users with the recover key.

If it continues to spread, this form of malware could result in a staggering number of victims. Once again we are reminded of how important it is to vigilantly protect ourselves against fraudsters who will continue to exploit such weaknesses in our technological infrastructure.

According to the digital media analytics company comScore, between the months of December and March 2015, more than 187.5 million people in the U.S. owned smartphones. During that time, Google Android led the pack as the number one smartphone platform with 52.4 percent platform market share.

Read Also: Could Your Company Be Ransomeware’s Next Victim?

Malware Goes Mobile

The malware, called LockerPIN, spreads via third party applications, which are downloaded by the user to their Android device. Similar to the CryptoLocker and CryptoWall malware that has inundated users over the past several years, LockerPIN spreads malware’s reach to the mobile user.

Originally discovered in Ukraine in 2014 the malware has been modified to the point that it is just now making its North American debut. Disguised as a system update, the application changes the user’s PIN to a random setting without their knowledge. The worse part? The only known recovery solution is to perform a complete factory reset, which will result in the loss of all your data.

Fair Warning

It’s only a matter of time before this malware progresses to the point of being able to infect all phones. In the meantime, there are actions you can take to protect yourself.

1)     Never download apps outside of certified app stores.

2)     Back up your mobile devices to your computer or to the cloud regularly.

3)     Do not grant administrator privileges to apps unless you truly trust them.

4)     Stay away from suspicious apps and sites.

By Joe Welker, CISA (New Philadelphia office)

Want to learn more ways to protect yourself and your business from IT threats? Check out these articles.

Who Is That Email Really From? Red Flags To Be Aware Of When Opening Your Email

Who’s Fishing For Your Data Today?

Could A Cyber-Attack Cripple Your Business In 2015?

 

 

 

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