How Can I Make The Most of My Retirement?

Paul McEwan | April 23rd, 2014

During my 30 years of financial planning experience, I have come to find that there are four phases of a person’s life. If you’re a Baby Boomer, each phase is approximately 22 years in length. Phase 1 is our formal education and/or training. During Phase 2, we try to figure out what we are going to do for a living, and then focus on becoming as proficient at it as we can be. In Phase 3, we strive to be on top of our game and begin to accumulate wealth. It’s Phase 4 that should prove to be, as long as we enjoy good health, the most gratifying phase of our lives. For in Phase 4, we should be able to step back and enjoy our journey at a more relaxed pace. It is during this phase that we are oftentimes best positioned to positively impact the people and causes that are important to us, while hopefully leaving this world a little better than we found it.

Financial and Emotional Threats to Retirement

Certainly, there are financial challenges that you may face that you should address in order to live the lifestyle necessary to accomplish your mission. These financial challenges exist for many of us due to longer life spans, the decrease of defined benefit retirement plans, and the uncertainty surrounding programs such as Social Security and Medicare. Because of our longer life expectancies and the disappearance of guaranteed pensions, many Baby Boomers are choosing to cut back the hours that they work rather than retire. For some it becomes a phase-out period of their career, while others choose to commence an entirely new career.

I have had the privilege to work with financially successful people whose fourth phase of life is not threatened by financial insecurity. However, they may have confronted emotional challenges that surface due to their loss of identity. It’s common for a person in a management position of a large company to discover that many of the people they considered friends prove to have been what I refer to as “positional acquaintances.”

Once that person retires and no longer holds a position on the company’s organization chart, the remaining people on the chart begin to interact with the new leader and no longer interact with the retiree.

So regardless of whether the threat to your enjoyment of Phase 4 is financial and/or emotional, below is a list of potential remedies that should be helpful tools as you attempt to position yourself for an enjoyable victory lap of your life’s journey.

7 Remedies To Help You Enjoy Your Retirement

  1. Develop hobbies or participate in community service activities that will provide you with an outlet to use your time and talent.
  2. Diversify your group of friends to include individuals who are not from work.
  3. Be a disciplined contributor to your retirement plan. During Phase 2, always contribute at a minimum the amount that your employer will match. During Phase 3, consider contributing the maximum amount permitted.
  4. Consider phasing out of your career and/or commencing on a new career that is aligned with your time, talents and passions. Continuing to earn an income can afford you the option of delaying access to your retirement funds and Social Security benefits.
  5. Become familiar with your Social Security options. Waiting to access your monthly benefits until you’re 70 years of age can generate a 75 percent increase of your monthly benefit at age 62. With today’s life expectancies, doing so could provide significantly more retirement benefits to you or your spouse during your lifetimes.
  6. Examine your current lifestyle and determine what is important to you. Where possible, trim unnecessary activities and related expenses and begin shaping your desired retirement lifestyle.
  7. Leverage tax law to subsidize the cost of your chosen lifestyle. The American Taxpayer Relief Tax Act of 2012 added a complexity of additional tax brackets and disappearing tax deductions that are tied to income levels. As a result, tax bracket management, where you accelerate or defer income into low tax bracket year and deductible expenses into high tax bracket year has become more important. Proactive tax bracket management, coupled with disciplined investment of realized tax savings, can significantly enhance the cash flow available to you during your victory lap.

By applying the strategies above, the increased amount of cash you could realize during retirement could be the difference between enjoying your retirement or not enjoying it. Consider taking some of these steps today in order to enhance your chances of living your dream in the future.

Retirement Planning Help

If you’re unsure of what your future retirement holds, contact Rea & Associates. Our team of Ohio personal tax professionals can help you evaluate where you’re at currently and can help you map out where you want to go on your retirement journey.

Author: Paul McEwan, CPA, MTax, AIFA (New Philadelphia office)

 

Want to gain more tips for retirement planning? Check these blog posts out:

Retirement Is Knocking … Are You Ready To Answer The Door?

Will You Be Ready for Retirement?

What Are The Rules For Taking A Distribution from My 401(k) Plan?

 

Share Button

Tags: , , , , , ,


Leave a Reply