Archive for the ‘Tax’ Category

Retirees Get Cranky Over Tax Returns

Tuesday, November 4th, 2014

Tax preparation and tax payments often become MORE complicated in retirement. Why? Because retirement taxation is new for a retiree so there’s a learning curve. Here are a few cliff notes to help new retirees navigate these uncharted waters:

Social Security

The money you receive from Social Security will likely be taxable. Fifteen percent of your Social Security benefit is a return on your lifetime payroll deductions and your employer’s match. Eighty-five percent of your Social Security is the excess benefit payment, or “growth,” in your benefit account and, thus, your untaxed benefit. That 85 percent may be taxable depending on the amount of your other income. This calculation is complex and the tax is difficult to avoid, but it is possible.

IRA Distributions

You must take your IRA distributions when you have reached the age of 70-½. The Required Minimum Distribution (RMD) can be managed and will impact your taxable Social Security. Planning is essential.

Capital Gains

As your lifetime investments are sold to help pay for retirement, capital gains is another obstacle to overcome. Here are a few tips to make them more manageable:

  • It may take a little time, but document when you bought those investments and what you paid for them. Once your record is complete, give the information to your broker to record in your investment account statement.
  • If you own your investments directly, gather them up and put them into an investment account to simplify your tracking, cost barriers, tax preparation and estate administration.

Itemized deductions

The good news is that you have likely paid off your mortgage. The bad news is that you may no longer exceed the standard deduction to itemize. So then why do you keep tracking medical bills if you can’t itemize? “Bunching” deductions may be a planning option. For example, every OTHER year, I have my Mom pay her real estate taxes, Ohio tax estimates and charitable contributions she made during the year. Then I have her prepay next year’s real estate taxes, charitable contributions and Ohio estimated taxes in December. That doubles her itemized expenses and raises her total above the standard deduction. Then, I have her take an additional IRA distribution equal to the excess itemized deductions. That excess distribution equates to a tax-free payment because it is offset by the excess itemized expenses! This option is available to you too!

Estimated tax

You are required to calculate and pay your income tax by managing your social security and IRA retirement tax withholding, along with quarterly tax estimate payments. You must project and declare your taxable income by April 15 in the new-year. And remember, there are NO excuses for not paying them on time.

Complexities You Can Avoid

  1. Watch those managed stock accounts. The amount of programmed buying and selling creates more work for your CPA and will raise your tax preparation fee. Ask yourself if that activity really did make you more money after the incurred income tax and preparation fee. If it didn’t, revisit your managed stock accounts.
  2. Understand the publicly-traded LLCs recommended by your broker and know that you may need to extend your tax return because of the K-1 you will receive to report the income. Your preparation fee will be raised as well. Again, if you didn’t make any money after the incurred taxes and preparation fee, is it really worth it to continue?

The transition into retirement is not easy. Unfortunately, your money management and tax filing won’t be easier either. Our tax experts are always happy to answer any question you may have. Email Rea & Associates to learn more about your options for managing your retirement.

Author: Don McIntosh, CPA (New Philadelphia office)

 

Related Articles

How Can I Make The Most Of My Retirement?

Retirement Is Knocking … Are You Ready To Answer The Door?

Why Should You Review Your Retirement Documents Now?

 

Share Button

The Totalization Conundrum: Tax Tips for Employees Abroad

Friday, October 31st, 2014

Taxes are confusing enough when geography isn’t a factor. Now imagine that you are accepting a short-term opportunity as an independent contractor overseas. Do you have any tax obligations while you are away? If so, how should these obligations be managed? Is there a difference between working as an independent contractor overseas versus working as an independent contractor in the United States?

Someone recently reached out to us to find answers to these questions. We researched her question a little further to arrive at the following conclusion: yes – on all counts.

As an independent contractor working overseas for a short period of time you will:

  • Owe self-employment tax
  • Have to pay advanced taxes (i.e. make estimated payments)

In fact, if you are an American citizen, it does not matter if the work you complete is inside or outside the United States, your tax obligations are universal regardless of where in the world you are staying.

That said, the bigger question becomes, will the income you generate be taxed more than once. The answer to this question is: maybe.

For example, if you are working in India, you may be expected to pay into India’s social security program. The good news is that the U.S. has made agreements with many nations to prohibit multiple tax practices from occurring. For income tax purposes, these agreements are called Tax Treaties. When the issue pertains to Social Security purposes, they are called Totalization Agreements.

Why Are Totalization Agreements Important?

A Totalization Agreement is meant to improve Social Security protection for those who have worked (or are working) in multiple countries. The agreement essentially provides a way to manage how taxes are distributed and how workers are credited for the progress made toward their Social Security benefits (or similar programs abroad) between the two or more countries in which the employee has worked.

Again, using India as the example, because no Totalization Agreement exists, a U.S. citizen working in India should be prepared to pay in to each country’s social security program. This isn’t the case in countries where Totalization Agreements are in place.

A U.S. citizen working in the Canadian Province of Quebec, as an independent contractor, for example, would only be obligated to pay U.S. Social Security taxes. In this example, a Totalization Agreement between Quebec and America would also mean:

  • A self-employed American citizen working in Quebec would not have to pay in to Quebec’s social security program.
  • The taxes and Social Security accumulated by an employee of an American company working in Quebec would be distributed by the American company to the U.S. government.

You can learn more about the Totalization Agreement between the United States and Quebec here. Or you can view a list of countries with Totalization Agreements in place with the U.S. here.

Additional Deductions Are Available

Even though Americans working in India may be required to pay into social security programs in both countries, a Tax Treaty protects U.S. citizens from paying income taxes to both countries. Additionally, there are other ways to find tax savings as an employee working overseas.

  • Even though you may be required to pay into the county’s social security program, this cost can likely be deducted per the foreign tax credit, which was established to assist American taxpayers who find themselves working from countries where Totalization Agreements are not in place – such as India.
  • If you are planning a temporary absence from your tax home in the U.S. for business, your away-from-home expenses may also be deductible. So keep track of your travel, meal and lodging costs.

If you are an American working overseas who is struggling with the tax obligations between your country of residence and your country of employment, email Rea & Associates today. Our tax professionals will help you identify your tax obligations while you are abroad and can help you successfully deduct business-related expenses on your next tax return.

Author: Chris Axene (Dublin office)

 

Related Articles

Getting Back To Business: How Outsourcing May Provide Relief To Your Business

Ready, Set, Download: IRS2Go Mobile App 2014

Do You Export? Lower Your Taxes with IC-DISC

Share Button

Are You Prepared To Pay?: Obamacare’s Shared Responsibility Provision

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014

American businesses have been feeling the push and pull of Obamacare on their bottom lines for a while. Now, it’s time for individuals who chose to forego health insurance coverage to see what the individual shared responsibility provision has in store for them. If you did not have insurance coverage in 2014, you may need to send a little more money to the IRS when you go to file your 2014 federal tax return.

The individual shared responsibility provision became active in 2014 and, absent an exemption, requires individuals to pay a fee into the system if they choose not to carry health care insurance.

An exemption may be granted if:

  • The minimum cost for your premiums totals over 8 percent of your household’s total income.
  • You have had a gap in your health insurance coverage for less than three consecutive months.
  • You have a hardship that prevented you from obtaining coverage.
  • You are a member of certain religious groups (e.g. Amish) and you have Supplemental Security Income (SSI) exemption on file.
  • There are several other criteria and fine print you can see here.

According to the IRS, your shared responsibility payment for 2014 will either be “the greater of one percent of the household’s income above the income filing threshold for your tax filing status, or a flat dollar amount of $95 per adult and $47.50 per child (under the age of 18) – but no more than $285 per family. The individual shared responsibility payment is also capped at the cost of the national average premium for bronze level health plans available through the health insurance marketplace that would cover everyone in your family who does not have minimum essential coverage and does not qualify for an exemption – for example, $12,240 for a family of five.”  This fee will increase in future years.

As you prepare to file your 2014 federal tax return, here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • You must make the IRS aware of whether your household had minimum essential coverage for each month in 2014. This can be done by checking a box identified on your tax return document.
  • If your household qualified for an exemption in 2014, an additional form must be attached to your tax return, which will provide the IRS with the information needed to approve the exemption claim.
  • Those required to make an individual shared responsibility payment, must make the payment when you submit your federal tax return to the IRS.

If you’re unsure whether you qualify for an exemption or need help calculating how much you will owe to the government when making your shared responsibility payment, email Rea & Associates. We can help you determine how the shared responsibility provision will affect you.

Author: Joe Popp, JD, LLM (Dublin)

 

Interested in other Obamacare-related posts? Check these out:

Health Insurance Options: Shop, Drop, Roll, or Self-insure?

How Will ACA Federal Exchange Premiums Affect Ohio Small Businesses And Consumers?

With The Affordable Care Act ‘Pay Or Play’ Provision Delayed, I Don’t Have To Do Anything Until 2015, Right? Wrong!

Share Button

Ready, Set, Download: IRS2Go Mobile App 2014

Monday, October 20th, 2014

In June, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) made the 2014 version of IRS2Go available to mobile users. This free app can help you stay on top of your federal income tax refund. You can also request your tax return or account transcript or receive tips and updates from the IRS via the app.

Benefits of IRS2GO App

Compatible with Apple and Android devices, the IRS2Go mobile app has been redesigned and includes several new and updated features, such as:

  • IRS2Go makes it easier for individuals to check their refunds at a time that’s convenient for them. To get there, just click on “Refund Status,” enter your Social Security Number (which is masked for security purposes), then select your filing status and the amount of your anticipated refund. The new “status tracker” allows users to identify where their return is in the tax return process. NOTE: Returns filed electronically can be viewed 24 hours after the return was received by the IRS. Paper returns take longer to process and can take up to four weeks before their status is available to view.
  • Another helpful feature is your ability to request your tax records or your account transcript. While, for security reasons, the records cannot be viewed immediately on your Smartphone or device, the request will be processed and your records will be delivered promptly to the address on record.
  • If you need help preparing your tax return, IRS2Go helps users find IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) or Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) programs by simply entering a ZIP code and mileage range.
  • Users also have the opportunity to stay connected, view more content and interact directly with IRS on Twitter, YouTube, Facebook or by signing up for email updates.

To download the IRS2Go app on your Apple iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch device, visit the iTunes app store. To download IRS2Go on your Android devise, visit the Google Play store.
By Kelly Leslie, CPA (Cambridge office)

 

Related Articles

Where’s Your Tax Refund?

What’s The Relationship Between Side-Businesses And Tax Deductions?

Share Button

To Shred Or Not To Shred: That Is The Question … Ask Your Financial Advisor

Monday, October 6th, 2014

Are you wondering what to do with all those tax documents and records you have piling up around your office or in your computer files? Are you thinking about wiping them from your company’s hard drive or sending them to the shredder? Not so fast. The IRS has several rules when it comes to how long your business should keep its records. Make sure you are up to date on the current records retention schedule before you permanently delete something important.

Generally speaking, records that support your income or deduction claims for tax return purposes should be kept until the period of limitations for a particular tax return expires. The “period of limitations” is defined as the period of time the IRS gives you to change information on your return, particularly when the information relates to a refund or credit you have claimed. Also, just because you aren’t planning to make any changes to your tax return doesn’t mean the IRS won’t. Therefore it’s in your best interest to keep your documents until the IRS can no longer assess additional taxes or request additional information from you.

Below is a quick reference guide pertaining to some common records your office has been collecting over the years and how long you should keep them.

Records You Should Keep Permanently:

  • Copyright registration
  • Correspondence (legal and important matters)
  • Deeds, mortgages, bills of sale
  • Depreciation schedules
  • Financial statements (end-of-year)
  • General and private ledgers (and end-of-year trial balances)
  • Insurance records, current accident reports, claims, policies, etc.
  • Minute books for director and stockholder (including bylaws and charter)
  • Property appraisals by outside appraisers
  • Retirement and pension records
  • Tax returns and worksheets, revenue agent’s reports and other documents relating to determination of income tax, sales tax, or payroll tax liability

Records That Should Be Retained For At Least Seven Years:

  • Accident reports and claims (settled cases)
  • Accounts payable/receivable ledgers and schedules
  • Expense analyses and expense distribution schedules
  • Garnishments
  • Inventories of products, materials and supplies
  • Plant cost ledgers
  • Telephone logs/message books
  • Time books/cards
  • Withholding tax statements
  • Employee payroll records (W-2, W-4, annual earnings, etc.)

Records That Can Be Destroyed After Three Years:

  • Bank deposit slips
  • Employment records
  • General correspondence
  • Internal work orders
  • Production and sales reports
  • Sales commission reports

If the records you are looking for aren’t listed above, you can find additional record retention recommendations in our current record retention schedule.

IMPORTANT: The actual amount of time you are required to keep a specific document may be longer depending on your business or what is contained in the document. If you have questions about specific documents or would like some advice on your current record retention practices, email Rea & Associates.

Author: Joe Popp, JD, LLM (Dublin office)

 

Related Articles:

How Do You Keep Your Tax Documents Organized?

Getting Back To Business: How Outsourcing May Provide Relief To Your Business

How Can You Best Prepare For The Upcoming Tax Season?

Share Button

IRS Says You Owe More? Don’t Write That Check Yet!

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

Tax season can be rough for any business. Just about the time you allow yourself to move on to something else and breathe a sigh of relief … it happens. You sift through your mail and find yourself staring face-to-face with a letter from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). In a matter of seconds your adrenaline levels are through the roof. You know that what’s inside the envelope isn’t a simple thank-you note for filing your taxes on time. You carefully tear it open.

Nobody likes to hear that they have to pay more to the IRS than they originally thought. But, before you jump to conclusions and quickly write out a check for the amount the letter says you owe:

  • Stop
  • Take a deep breath
  • Call your financial advisor

4 Tips For Resolving Your Tax Dispute

Believe it or not, the IRS does make mistakes. Agents can accidentally input incorrect information, computers can misread data and tax codes can be inadvertently overlooked or misinterpreted. It happens. If you believe that the IRS was wrong in a decision it made about your business’s tax returns, follow these four steps to reach a resolution.

  1. Follow Instructions. Sometimes the easiest way to resolve the issue is to follow the instructions. Sounds easy enough, but not everybody gets this part right. If the IRS sent you a notice, look for the section that explains what to do if you disagree with their decision and follow directions. Additionally, be sure to attach any supporting documentation and mail it back to the address given by the deadline requested. After the IRS has made its decision, you will be notified via U.S. Mail. When in doubt, opt to send inquiries to the IRS via certified mail and request a receipt.
  2. Make The Call. If your initial challenge was rejected, your next step is to follow up with a phone call. The rejection notice you received should have included another important piece of information: the contact name and number of the IRS employee who rejected your challenge. When you call, in a polite and professional manner, ask to speak to the employee’s manager. Even though you are passing over the employee on the chain of command, take care not to say anything about why you are asking to speak with their supervisor. The last thing you need is to create animosity. When you finally have the opportunity to speak with a supervisor, your case should be laid out in much the same way as your original challenge. You should be clear and concise in your explanation while taking care to address any concerns that were noted by the original employee in their rejection letter. If your letter didn’t include an employee’s name and phone number, send another certified letter to a general supervisor with the agency and request that they reconsider your case.
  3. Appealing To A Higher Office. If you still haven’t convinced the IRS to change its mind, don’t give up – even if you have already mailed several letters and racked up a lot of call time with the agency. Further up the chain of command is the Office of Appeals, an independent office within the IRS. This is just one more step you have to take on your journey to find an IRS employee who agrees with your. To get your case to the Office of Appeals, follow the instructions that were found in the earlier notices. If you are unable to locate these instructions, you can find them on the IRS website.
  4. Welcome to U.S. Tax Court. Sometimes a resolution can’t be achieved in the first three steps of the appeal process. If you find yourself in this situation your final option is to take the case to the U.S. Tax Court. At this point you may be discouraged and may even question whether you should continue on with the fight, but if you still believe that the IRS is wrong it is probably in your best interest to see it out to the end.

If your dispute is less than $50,000 you will have the option to represent yourself. Similar to how a small-claims court operates, there is no jury and the judge will not hold your inexperience against you. Once court is in session you will state your case again, provide evidence and answer any questions a judge may ask about the claim. Be advised, however, that once a decision is made at this phase it is final and cannot be appealed.

Sometimes, even though you have decided that you want to move forward, an IRS attorney may offer to settle out of court for a figure less than what the IRS says you owe. If this happens, you need to decide whether you will accept the settlement or if you will move forward with presenting your case to the judge. The choice is yours.

If you find yourself at odds with the IRS over a tax issue and are not sure how to proceed, email Rea & Associates for more information.

 

Related Articles:

How Far Back Can The IRS Go For Tax Auditing?

Are You Having Trouble Staying Current With Payroll Taxes?

Does Your Company Have Strong Internal Controls?

Share Button

Getting Back To Business: How Outsourcing May Provide Relief To Your Business

Friday, September 19th, 2014

As a business owner, you have a lot to think about. Your investors, managers, employees and clients depend on you to deliver top notch products and services while keeping overhead costs low in favor of increased revenue. In fact, your business’s success can probably be attributed to your leadership skills and your knack for being able to see the big picture while bringing together all the other elements to reach a profitable conclusion. So why are you still in charge of handling your business’s accounting and bookkeeping needs when you could be so much more effective guiding your business toward further growth? Outsourcing may provide you and your business with the relief you need to get back on track.

Maybe you think your business is just too small to hire an accountant or bookkeeper or that you’re saving money by doing these jobs yourself. Perhaps you just aren’t aware of what options are available to you and your business. When you consider that the most effective solution is the one that effectively addresses your unique needs and budget, it should be no surprise that an outside accounting firm may be the answer you’ve been looking for.

Know Your Strengths And Weaknesses

The cost of hiring a full-time accountant or bookkeeper is a huge concern for many small business owners. To avoid a large expense, many owners or managers will purchase a copy of QuickBooks and try to work through their accounts themselves. Unfortunately, even if they have basic accounting skills, they may not have the patience, expertise and experience to handle the work. If done incorrectly, accounting flaws can be very costly, and could result in catastrophic consequences for your business.

Proper accounting and bookkeeping is essential to the short- and long-term success of your business. Outsourcing your accounting and bookkeeping work can help ensure accuracy and will free you up to focus on future growth, higher efficiency and increased sales. Below are a few examples of how outsourcing can solve your small business challenges.

***

Issue: Your business is relatively small (with a similar budget), and you can’t justify bringing on a full-time accountant.

Solution: Hiring an in-house accountant could turn out to be a hefty expense, especially if the quantity of work is relatively minimal throughout most of the year. Not only do you have to pay the new employee a living wage and benefits, you must be prepared to invest in the software and/or training a new accountant needs. By filtering work to an outsourced controller, you will have access to affordable, ongoing or as needed reporting. As a result, your management team will become more flexible and will have more data – and thus more authority – when making decisions that directly affect the business.

***

Issue: You’ve already invested in QuickBooks to manage your business’s finances. It seems to be working well so far, but you haven’t been formally trained on the software.

Solution: While QuickBooks is easy to use, sufficient supervision by someone who is proficient with accounting skills is essential. Without a QuickBooks expert on hand, you will have no clue as to what is going on “behind the numbers.” A trained and certified accountant can tap into the various capabilities of the software, which include the reconciliation process, accounts receivable tracking and accounts payable, etc. When your bottom line is at stake, you owe it to yourself and to your business to minimize problems that may occur. You can avoid any hiccups with the help of a CPA.

***

Issue: You don’t need all the capabilities an accounting firm offers and you don’t want to pay for a service you may never use.

Solution: Your CPA will work with you to make sure all of your accounting needs are met and that the services that are provided only address the needs of your business. Services that can be outsourced include full accounting services, oversight work and everything in between. You also have the option of expanding services if and when you need them. Outsourcing options available to you include:

  • Working with an accountant several times throughout the year to clean up your accounting and ensure a smoother year-end tax process.
  • Tasking an accountant with filing certain commercial activities and taxes on time to insure accuracy and to avoid overpaying.
  • Hiring an accountant to provide periodic financial statements to banks.
  • Utilizing an accountant as an extra set of eyes on all manner of documents. This provides you with a great system of control when ensuring the accuracy of your books.

Speak to a Rea & Associates CPA to find out how an accounting firm can address your unique accounting and bookkeeping challenges while allowing you to make the best use of your time. Learn more about the services our business accounting professionals offers.

Article: Ryan Dumermuth, CPA, CFP (Mentor office)

 

Related Articles

Do You Need A CFO?

The Importance Of Budgeting For the Small Business Owner

What’s In Your Business’s Financial Toolbox?

Share Button

When Scammers Demand That You Pay Up, IRS Says You Should Hang Up

Monday, August 18th, 2014

More than 1,000 American taxpayers have collectively lost about $5 million as a result of a recent phone scam that has been reported to be active in virtually every corner of the nation. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) reminds everybody to be vigilant, to never give personal financial information to anybody over the phone, and to report instances of phone scams to the IRS and/or to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA).

According to IRS Commissioner John Koskinen, “Taxpayers should remember their first contact with the IRS will not be a call from out of the blue, but through official correspondence sent through the mail. A big red flag for these scams are angry, threatening calls from people who say they are from the IRS and urging immediate payment. This is not how we operate. People should hang up immediately and contact TIGTA or the IRS.”

To date, more than 90,000 complaints regarding the scam have been made to the IRS and TIGTA.

Signs of An IRS Phone Scam

A media release, sent Aug. 13, reports that scammers will use fake names and IRS badge numbers, are able to recite the last four digits of a victim’s social security number, and spoof the IRS’ toll-free number on caller IDs so that the calls appear legitimate. Victims reported that they were threatened with jail time or driver’s license revocation if they refused to comply with demands. After hanging up, scammers call back claiming to be local law enforcement or a DMV representative. The second phone call is supposed to reinforce their original claim and demands.

Don’t Be An IRS Phone Scam Victim

  • If you think you might owe taxes or that there may be an issue with your taxes, call the IRS directly at (800) 829-1040. An authorized IRS representative can help you determine if you have a payment due.
  • If you get a suspicious call from someone claiming to be from the IRS and you know that you have no IRS issues, report the incident to TIGTA at (800) 366-4484. You should also contact the Federal Trade Commission and use its “FTC Complaint Assistant” at FTC.gov. Be sure to add “IRS Telephone Scam” to the comments of your complaint.
  • Don’t let scammers catch you off your guard with questions about your tax history. Call your CPA and be confident about whether you owe money to the IRS or not. When it comes to your financial security, take a proactive approach.

Email Rea & Associates if you’re ever unsure about anything you received from the IRS, whether it is a letter, a phone call or an email. We can help you determine if the inquiry is legitimate.

By Maribeth Wright, CPA (Cambridge office)

 

Looking for other articles on how you can protect yourself and your business? We recommend these:

How Can I Protect My Business From A Data Security Breach?

Are You Secure? Cyber Security Targets Employee Benefit Accounts

How Do You Protect Yourself From Identity Theft?

 

Share Button

Obtaining Tax-Exempt Status Just Got Easier

Tuesday, August 12th, 2014

Many individuals want to know how easy it is to obtain tax-exempt status. About a month ago, you would have been told that the application process alone was rather lengthy. In fact, the standard Form 1023, which is the Application for Recognition of Exemption Under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, is 26 pages in length. On July 1, the Internal Revenue Service introduced a significantly shorter application form – Form 1023-EZ – which is just three pages long.

What Is Form 1023-EZ?

Form 1023-EZ is a simplified version of Form 1023 and its use is limited to organizations with gross receipts of $50,000 or less and total assets of $250,000 or less. The IRS says that 70 percent of new applicants should be able to use the new form, but to ensure that the right organizations are using the right form; the IRS has outlined factors that may disqualify larger organizations from using the new form. Be sure to read the instructions carefully.

The IRS says it currently has more than 60,000 backlogged 501(c)(3) applications. The new, streamlined application form is anticipated to speed up the approval process for smaller groups, which means the agency will have more resources available to review applications submitted by larger organizations.

What You Need To Know About The 1023-EZ Form

If you are planning to fill out the new EZ form, here are three things you need to know:

  • The new EZ form must be filed online.
  • A $400 user fee is due at the time the form is submitted and must be paid through pay.gov.
  • Users must complete an eligibility checklist, which is included in the instructions for Form 1023-EZ, before filing the form.

Obtaining Tax-Exempt Status and Creating A Tax-Exempt Organization

The new EZ form makes it very easy to create a tax-exempt organization, but applicants should always seek professional assistance to ensure that their organization is operating, and will continue to operate, in accordance with their tax-exempt purpose.

Email Rea & Associates and ask if your organization qualifies to use Form 1023-EZ. Our team of business accounting and consulting professionals can answer your questions and guide you on your path to formally establishing your tax-exempt organization.

Author: Lisa Beamer, CPA (New Philadelphia office)

Share Button

The Do’s and Don’ts of Summertime Tax Prep

Thursday, August 7th, 2014

It’s the beginning of August and you’re probably not keeping yourself up at night thinking about your taxes. Frankly, who has time to think about itemized deductions and tax-free distributions when you would rather be grilling out, soaking in the sun, or enjoying your family vacation? April 15, 2015, may be more than 260 days away, but now is a great time to look at your taxes and make necessary adjustments to effectively sidestep any potential problems that might cause problems when tax season does arrive.

Consider These Tax Prep Do’s and Don’ts

  • Don’t assume that filing your taxes will be the same as the year before. More than 50 tax provisions expired on Dec. 31.
  • Do make yourself aware of any changes that have occurred since last tax season. Some of the most common expired provisions include:
    • Itemized deduction for state and local general sales tax
    • Itemized deduction for mortgage insurance premiums (PMI)
    • Tax-free distributions from individual retirement plans for charitable purposes
    • 50 percent accelerated tax depreciation (“Bonus depreciation”).
    • Increased expensing. (This provision allows businesses to deduct the full purchase price of qualified equipment.) Current 2014 provisions are $25,000 deduction with a $200,000 limitation on purchases.
  • Do take time to manage your files. It’s much more manageable to file six months’ worth of receipts vs. a whole years’ worth in January. Are you looking for inspiration? Now is a good time to start organizing medical and charitable contribution receipts.
  • Do make a note as to whether the size of your household changed.
  • Don’t forget to review your withholdings. Did you receive a large refund in 2013? Did you owe the IRS in April? To adjust your withholdings, speak with your payroll representative and complete a new W-4.
  • Do send your estimated payments for income to the IRS every quarter to avoid charges and penalties for underpayments. If you forgot to make a payment or you underpaid in April or June, don’t worry. There’s still time to catch up on your September and January payments.
  • Don’t underestimate the short-term value of retirement contributions. Aside from the long-term savings benefits, many retirement accounts are a great tax deferral. If you are participating and not maxing out, consider increasing your contribution. Contributions to a Traditional IRA are another consideration.
  • Do set aside some time to review your health insurance situation. Alternatively, if you did not maintain health care coverage (and were not exempted) you will owe a penalty with your 2014 1040.
  • Do confirm that you comply with the new repair/capitalization regulations.

Tax Prep Help

A few minutes of work and organization now could save you some major headaches in April. Don’t miss out on your opportunity to jump start your tax prep. Want more tax prep tips? Contact Rea & Associates. Our team of Ohio tax professionals can help you determine what you need to do now to ensure tax time goes smoothly for you.

By: Trista Acker, CPA, CFP (Dublin office)

 

Want more tax prep tips? Check these blog posts out:

What Should You Do After Tax Season?

How Can A Small Business Owner Keep More Money In Their Pocket?

So Is It a Tax Credit Or a Tax Deduction?

 

Share Button

Be On Guard For IRS Phone Scams

Thursday, July 17th, 2014

You get a call from a man who said he was from the IRS and was informing you that criminal activity was found after the IRS performed an audit on your past taxes. Then he asks if you had a criminal lawyer to represent you. And as you tried to get a word in edgewise, he told you not to interrupt him because the IRS and local authorities were recording your phone call. Pretty unnerving, right?

Well, unfortunately, this phone call actually took place with a client. And these types of phone calls are happening constantly. Back in April, the IRS issued a warning for consumers about phone scams targeting taxpayers. During the 2013 tax filing season numerous phone scams occurred, but the IRS has seen an increase in these scams since then. Because the IRS believes that these incidents will continue to plague taxpayers, it’s important to be vigilant for these kinds of calls.

The 4-1-1 On These IRS Phone Scams

  • Some taxpayers who received these calls were told they’re entitled to a big tax refund, or that they owe a lot of money to the IRS that needs to be paid immediately. Don’t be fooled. The IRS won’t contact you via phone about these matters. If you ever owe the IRS money, you’ll be sent a written notification via mail.
  • The IRS will never ask you for personal financial information over the phone, such as your credit or debit card information. If you’re asked for this information from someone claiming they’re from the IRS, don’t give it and report the incident immediately to the IRS.
  • Some IRS scammers use fake names/surnames (most of the time these names are common) and IRS badge numbers when they identify themselves.
  • It’s possible that a scammer knows and can tell you the last four digits of your Social Security number.
  • The phone number that a scammer calls you from could look like it’s from the IRS toll-free number.
  • If you take one of these scam calls, you may receive a bogus follow-up email to make it look like it is a legitimate inquiry from the IRS.
  • You may be threatened with jail time or driver’s license suspension from one of these scammers. They may then hang up on you and then call back pretending to be the police or DMV, further trying to prove their claim to you.

What Should You Do If You Get One Of These Calls?

So have you received one of these calls? If so, and you’re not sure the next step, here’s what you should do:

  • If you think you might owe taxes or there may be an issue with your taxes, call the IRS at 1.800.829.1040. Someone at the line can help you determine if you indeed have a payment due.
  • If you feel you received this call unexpectedly and know you have no IRS issues, call and report the incident to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration at 1.800.366.4484.

In light of these increasing incidents, be on the lookout and don’t fall prey to these scams. Hang up if you’re uncomfortable with the call. And know that the IRS would never ask for personal financial information over the phone or in an email. If you receive any suspicious emails, forward the email to phishing@irs.gov.

Ohio Tax Help

If you’re ever unsure about anything you received from the IRS, whether it be a letter, a phone call or email, contact Rea & Associates. Our team of Ohio tax professionals can help you determine if the inquiry is legitimate, and assist you with responding.

Author: Maribeth Wright, CPA (Cambridge office)

 

Looking for other articles on how to protect you and your business? Check out these articles:

How Can Heartbleed Affect You and Your Business’s Online Identity?

How Can I Protect My Business From A Data Security Breach?

Are You Secure? Cyber Security Targets Employee Benefit Accounts

 

Share Button

Help Is Available For Small Manufacturers Impacted By Foreign Imports

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

America is the land of the free, and a place where we’re all supposed to have boundless opportunities. So if you’re the business owner of a small manufacturer, and you’re feeling financially and competitively pinched because of foreign imports, know that there is relief.

Trade Adjustment Assistance

The U.S. Department of Commerce’s Economic Development Administration developed and funds a program to help manufacturing companies become more competitive against foreign imports. The program, “Trade Adjustment Assistance for Firms,” provides up to $75,000 in matching funds to qualifying manufacturers to invest in projects identified during the plan development phase. Qualifying projects must be time-limited and performed by third parties who provide knowledge-based help covering the areas of marketing, industrial and systems engineering or financial and general management consulting.

Examples of “qualifying projects” include:

  • New product development marketing
  • Lean manufacturing implementations
  • Quality certifications (ISO, TS)
  • Enterprise resource planning (system selection, training)

“Non-qualifying” projects include:

  • Capital expenditures (e.g. equipment or software)
  • On-going business expenses (e.g. FTE salaries)
  • On-going business processes

Big Benefit Of Trade Adjustment Assistance for Firms Program

An added benefit of the program is a customized diagnostic survey and comprehensive action plan created for the business by the program’s personnel. There is no fee to apply to the program. Once eligibility for the program is confirmed, the plan development phase typically takes one to three months with the implementation phase able to run for up to five years. Any funds not expended after five years are lost.

Funding for this program was recently renewed so now is the time to invest 30 minutes of your time to speak with a program representative to see if you qualify.

Ohio Small Manufacturer Help

If you’re an Ohio Small Manufacturer that’s having trouble keeping up with foreign imports and competition, and needs assistance with strengthening your business’s bottom line, contact Rea & Associates. Our Ohio manufacturing service team can help you evaluate your business’s current financial state and determine what steps you need to take to get back in the game.

Author: Christopher E. Axene, CPA (Dublin office)

 

Looking for more Ohio manufacturing-related articles? Check these blog posts out:

How Can Manufacturers Deal With Competition?

How Can I Solve My Staffing Woes In The Manufacturing Industry?

How Do You Take Your Business to the Next Level?

 

Share Button

Supreme Court Obamacare Ruling Provides Religious Exemption To For-Profit Companies

Monday, June 30th, 2014

Obamacare is back in the news as a top story! Why? Because the U.S. Supreme Court ruled today that closely held, for-profit companies can claim religious exemption to avoid providing health insurance coverage for contraceptives.

An Obamacare provision stated that businesses with more than 50 employees must cover preventive care services, including birth control and morning-after pills to female employees. Today’s Supreme Court ruling provides relief for many U.S. for-profit companies by giving way to this religious exemption. Now companies that feel offering health insurance the covers contraceptives goes against their religious beliefs can opt out of providing this kind of coverage. Check out this New York Times article which provides a more in-depth look at the today’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling.  Of course, its too early to tell the practical impact of this decision – insurance companies are free to choose which kind of coverage is covered by their insurance plans, and the relative pricing of those plans, after all.

Obamacare Help

Do you feel like today’s Supreme Court ruling could impact your business and the health insurance coverage you offer to your employees? If it does, and you need help, contact Rea & Associates. Our health care reform tax experts can help you determine how it affects you and your business.

Author: Joe Popp, JD, LLM (Dublin office)

 

Interested in other Obamacare-related blog posts? Check these out:

What You Need To Know About Obamacare Employee Dumping 

Health Insurance Options: SHOP, Drop, Roll, or Self-insure?

How Will ACA Federal Exchange Premiums Affect Ohio Small Businesses and Consumers?

Share Button

How Far Back Can The IRS Go For Tax Auditing?

Friday, June 20th, 2014

As a CPA I am frequently asked, “How far back can the IRS look to audit my tax return?” That’s a great question. Can the IRS go back and audit your tax return from five years ago? 10 years ago? 25 years ago? Before you start to panic, rest assured that the IRS has a statute of limitations in place that generally puts a limit on the time allowed to audit you and assess additional tax.

Typically, the statute of limitations is three years for the IRS to include a tax return in an audit. This means the statute of limitations likely ran out on the majority of 2010 returns. The 2010 returns would have been due on April 15, 2011 … three years from that date was April 15, 2014. So most taxpayers are out of the woods for 2010 tax returns and all prior years. This same statute of limitations applies to the taxpayer when they would request a tax refund – you can only go back three years’ worth of returns to request a tax refund.

IRS Statute of Limitations Can Be Extended

But wait, before you start high-fiving everyone around you … that statute of limitations can be stretched out to six years if a substantial error is identified. A substantial error is defined as an omission of 25 percent or more of gross income. This may also apply to basis overstatements whenever property is sold.  Basis generally means the amount of capital investment in a property for tax purposes.

The U.S. Tax Court has given mixed results on whether or not basis overstatements constitute understatements of gross income. The Federal, Washington D.C., 7th  and 10th circuits have ruled in favor of the IRS, supporting the concept that basis overstatements open up the six-year statute. However, the 4th, 5th, and 9th circuits have ruled in favor of the taxpayer, holding that basis overstatements do not constitute substantial understatements of gross income.

When The IRS Statute of Limitations Doesn’t Expire

There are situations when the statute of limitations never expires. The most common is when a return never is filed. The other situation is when the IRS sues for civil tax fraud. Civil tax fraud cases are extremely rare because the burden of proof is so high for the IRS. The older the fraud, the colder the trail gets.

The IRS has stated that it tries to audit tax returns as soon as possible after they are filed. But in my professional experience, most audits are typically of returns filed within the last two years.

If an audit is not finished, the taxpayer may be asked to extend the statute of limitations for assessment of his or her tax return. Extending the statute will allow additional time to provide additional documentation to support a position, request an appeal if there is a disagreement with the audit results, or to claim a tax refund or credit. The extension will also allow the IRS time to complete the audit and provide additional time to process the audit results. It’s not mandatory to agree to extend the statute of limitations date. However, if the taxpayer does not agree, the auditor will be forced to make a determination based upon the information on hand at the time, which may not be favorable.

Tax Audit Help

If you’re concerned you’re at risk of an IRS audit or are looking for some clarity on the IRS statute of limitation for tax auditing, contact Rea & Associates. Our team of Ohio tax professionals can help you determine if you could be facing an audit, and can walk you through the process.

Author: Matt Pottmeyer, CPA (Marietta office)

 

Looking for additional articles about managing your taxes? Check these blog posts out:

What Tax Liabilities Accompany Inherited Real Estate?

What Should You Do After Tax Season?

How Can You Best Prepare For The Upcoming Tax Season?

 

Share Button

What You Need To Know About Obamacare Employee Dumping

Thursday, June 5th, 2014

You may have heard some buzz lately about the Obama administration and/or the IRS barring employers from “dumping” employees onto the health care exchanges – with some truly severe cash penalties for doing so. But is this really “new” news? What exactly does this mean? It might surprise you to know that employee dumping is not all it seems.

A recent New York Times article explains that “employee dumping” is the practice where an employer drops health insurance coverage to its employees, the employees go to the health care exchange to buy insurance, and then the employer on a pre-tax basis reimburses its employees for their premiums. This “have-your-cake-and-eat-it-too” approach (with various ways to accomplish it) was one of the leading responses to this legislation that Obamacare consultants developed. The administrating agencies (IRS, HHS, DOL) shut this option down when they issues guidance in September 2013. ANY attempt by an employer to pay an employee a pre-tax benefit for health insurance has since then been a very dangerous approach, although some exceptions exist (e.g. retirees only). This current “news” is simply a clarification that these things are indeed busted.

Can You Still Drop Health Care Insurance Coverage?

What if you want to drop your coverage, send employees to the exchange, and then increase their after-tax pay so that they can pay for exchange insurance? That’s OK, it doesn’t conflict with the rules. It’s only pre-tax benefits you should be concerned with.

What if you increase worker pay as I just described, and then the employee sinks that cash into an HSA that they get from a bank (for free)? That gets them a tax deduction (up to certain limits) … is that OK?  Yes! Remember that what the IRS is looking to prevent is employers trying to give pre-tax benefits without offering insurance – that is the “evil” that these regulations are designed to combat. Once the employer pays taxable wages to an employee, the employee is free to use whatever means they have available to be tax efficient.

A Pit Trap For The Unwary

So is “employee dumping” limited to the situation where employers are trying to push tax-free cash to employees? Actually no, and this is why I refer to this as “a pit trap for the unwary.” Dumping also refers to the practice of employers encouraging workers with high medical bills to go to the exchange.

What exactly does this mean? Think of it this way … As an employer, you have an insurance plan that still takes into account the health and claims of your workforce (they still exist). If you can get an employee to the exchange that has $400,000 of medical costs a year, you could potentially save a large sum of money and your employee is not harmed because they can get quality coverage on the exchange for no more than a healthy individual can.

Some companies throw a cash kicker on top for the employee to voluntarily drop coverage (what’s an extra $10,000 in cash if you are saving $100,000+). Everybody wins, right?  Well, not the Exchange. If it’s discovered that you – the employer – are doing this, there are administrative rules in place that can throw that cost back at you. Insurance companies have a duty to report suspected employee dumping, so be careful!

Obamacare Help

Have you considered “dumping” or are you unsure if you’re heading down this path? If so, contact Rea & Associates. Our team of Ohio tax professionals can help you determine what path is best for you to take, as well as help you stay in compliance with Obamacare rules and avoid any pitfalls along the way.

Author: Joe Popp, JD, LLM (Dublin office)

 

Interested in reading more on how Obamacare will impact you and your business? Check out these posts:

Peeling Back The Onion: Answering 3 Popular Obamacare Questions

Health Insurance Options: SHOP, Drop, Roll, or Self-insure?

How Will ACA Federal Exchange Premiums Affect Ohio Small Businesses and Consumers? 

 

Share Button

How Can A Small Business Owner Keep More Money In Their Pocket?

Thursday, May 8th, 2014

Who doesn’t want more money in their pocket? It’s something I think all of us would love to have. And small business owners are in luck! Accountants throughout the state of Ohio advocated for small business owners and worked with Ohio legislators to develop the Ohio Small Business Investor Income Deduction provision. In the 2013 tax year, Rea clients eligible for this tax deduction submitted nearly $80 million in tax deductions, and realized nearly $4 million in tax savings. This provision has truly helped small business owners keep money in their pocket!

How Do You Know If You Eligible For The Ohio Small Business Income Deduction?

If you’re a taxpayer who owns a business, such as a sole proprietorship, a partnership or a limited liability corporation, and you bring in $125,000 in Ohio-sourced income (that would be $250,000 if you’re married and file jointly), you’re eligible for this deduction. For the first $125,000 (or $250,000 married, filing jointly) you report, you can take up to a 50 percent tax deduction. For many business owners, that’s real, significant savings. Keep in mind that businesses themselves are not eligible for the deduction, but rather the business owner, as an individual taxpayer, is eligible.

Why This Deduction Matters  

This provision, along with others, provides a tax cut for individual taxpayers. Last year, Ohio Governor John Kasich released a broad tax reform package that was aimed at putting money back into Ohio taxpayers’ pockets. Part of this reform was the Ohio Small Business Investor Income Deduction (SBD). The Ohio SBD, along with a string of other tax cutting provisions, is aimed at cutting taxes for Ohio business owners and individuals by $2.7 billion over the next three years. The end goal: to build and accelerate economic and job growth in Ohio.

If you were eligible for this deduction in 2013, you should have realized tax savings. In looking to the future, have you considered what your 2014 tax savings could be by taking advantage of the Ohio SBD? If not, it’s something you should be looking into so you can keep more money in your business.

Ohio Tax Help

Unsure of your eligibility or need help in understanding how this deduction can apply to you? Contact Rea & Associates. Our team of Ohio tax professionals can review your operating structure and help you maximize your 2014 tax savings.

Author: Don McIntosh, CPA (New Philadelphia office)

 

Interested in reading more blog post about tax savings? Check these posts out:

How Will A Tax Credits and Incentives Plan Benefit Your Business?

So Is It a Tax Credit Or a Tax Deduction?

How Do You Make Your Charitable Contributions Count?

 

Share Button

What Should You Do After Tax Season?

Monday, April 14th, 2014

Now that most of you have either filed your 2013 tax return or at least gathered your tax information and sent it off to your CPA, I know what you’re thinking. Phew! I’m done with my taxes for yet another year! But guess what? No, you aren’t!

Now is the time to start planning for next year. The sooner you plan ahead and strategize for next year’s tax season, the better off you may be. Not happy with the amount of taxes that you had to pay this past year? Not happy that you seem to work harder and harder only to pay more in taxes and get further behind? Start planning now for future tax seasons!

Tax Planning For the Future

Here are a few things you can start working on now to help create a better tax experience for yourself next year:

  • Develop an investment strategy. Most people don’t understand the affect this can have on your tax return. You can control when and how to take gains from your investments. You should work on developing a long-term investment strategy with your investment advisor.
  • Create a plan to sell property. Are you considering selling property sometime in the future? Did you know that there are ways to minimize taxes that need to be paid on the sale of property? This isn’t done by calling your financial advisor and letting them know you just sold some property. Get them involved now and discuss that you plan to sell some property in three to five years. Your financial advisor can help you structure the property sale and ultimately help you control the tax effect.
  • Establish a business plan. If you’re thinking about starting a new business, work with your financial advisor now to determine what tax savings you may be able to realize. Depending on the type of entity there could be significant tax savings down the road. 

Tax Planning Help

While there’s no single quick fix to solving all of your business and tax woes, planning now will certainly help you when tax season rolls around next year – and the year after that and so on. If you need help with your tax planning, contact Rea & Associates. Our team of Ohio tax planning professionals can help you develop a tax strategy that best suits you for years to come.

Author: Dave McCarthy, CPA, CSEP (Medina office)

 

Want to read some more articles related to tax planning? Check these posts out?

What Is The Difference Between Fixed Asset Expensing And Capitalization?

So Is It a Tax Credit Or a Tax Deduction?

How Will A Tax Credits and Incentives Plan Benefit Your Business?

Share Button

Where’s Your Tax Refund?

Friday, March 28th, 2014

Do you find yourself checking your mailbox every day? Or maybe you’re watching your bank account to see if your account balance went up? It’s the time of year that many Americans are waiting with bated breath for their coveted tax refund. If you haven’t already, you’re probably getting ready to file your tax returns in the next few weeks, and you may be wondering when you can expect to receive your refund or if there’s anything you can do to speed it up. Well, wonder no more and read on!

Speeding Up Your 2013 Tax Refund

The best way to receive your tax refund sooner than later is to file your tax return electronically and to select “direct deposit” as the delivery method for your refund. Electronic filing is faster, more accurate, and more secure than paper-filing your return. Likewise, direct deposit is faster and more secure than receiving a paper check refund. There’s no chance of your refund check being lost or stolen if it’s electronically deposited directly into your bank account. Please note that calling the IRS will not speed up your refund.

When Will You Receive Your Federal Tax Refund?

If you’ve already submitted your 2013 tax return and are curious where your refund is at, you can check the status of your federal tax refund using the IRS program, “Where’s My Refund?” This is available at http://www.irs.gov/Refunds, or you can use the mobile app, IRS2GO. If you file your return electronically, you can check the status 24 hours after your return was electronically submitted. If you file a paper return, you can check the status four weeks after your return is mailed.

In order to use “Where’s My Refund?”, you’ll need the primary taxpayer’s social security number, the filing status, and the exact amount of the refund. Your return will be in one of three stages:  Return Received, Refund Approved, or Refund Sent. While using “Where’s My Refund?” will not speed up the waiting time, it’s a convenient way to check the status of your refund.

Got Tax Questions?

If you have tax-related questions, contact Rea & Associates. Our team of Ohio tax professionals would be happy to answer any questions you may have.

Author: Cathy Troyer, CPA (New Philadelphia office)

 

Looking for other tax-related articles? Check these out:

What Tax Benefits Exist When You Donate to Charity?

What Tax Liabilities Accompany Inherited Real Estate?

What’s The Relationship Between Side-Businesses And Tax Deductions?

 

Share Button

What Tax Benefits Exist When You Donate to Charity?

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

We’re three months into 2014, and you may be thinking about what charitable donations you’d like to make this year. If you’re planning to make a donation to a qualified 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, make sure to look at your investment portfolio before you write a check.  (more…)

Share Button

What Is The Petroleum Activities Tax and How Does It Affect My Business?

Monday, March 10th, 2014

Remember the CAT—the Commercial Activity Tax? Well, there’s another acronym you’ll need to get familiar with – the PAT, the Petroleum Activities Tax. Starting July 1, any receipts from the sale of motor fuel will be excluded from Commercial Activity Tax (CAT) receipts. That means if you’re a supplier of motor fuel, you’ll have to pay the replacement Petroleum Activities Tax (PAT), measured by your gross receipts for first sales of motor fuel outside of the distribution system in Ohio.  (more…)

Share Button

What Could Ohio’s Small Business Investor Income Tax Deduction Do For Me?

Thursday, February 27th, 2014

In an effort to become more taxpayer-friendly and reduce the effective tax rate, Ohio enacted the Small Business Investor Income Tax Deduction effective for tax year 2013. This tax deduction benefits many of Ohio’s individual income taxpayers. So how exactly does this deduction work?  (more…)

Share Button

What Tax Liabilities Accompany Inherited Real Estate?

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

So you just inherited some real estate. You’re probably now wondering – is this a blessing or a curse? From the tax perspective, of course. And that’s a good question to ask. Just because you inherit something doesn’t mean that you’re free and clear of any potential tax liabilities. Depending on how you use the property and if you sell it will determine if you have a taxable situation. So here’s what you should know about taxes and inherited real estate.  (more…)

Share Button

What Do The Recent IRS Final Regulations for Obamacare Entail?

Wednesday, February 12th, 2014

You’ve probably never received a Valentine’s Day gift from the IRS, but this year you did! On Monday, the IRS issued final regulations on Obamacare’s employer shared responsibility payment provision, otherwise known as the “pay or play” provision. Like many things the IRS announces, there’s quite a bit a fine print. This time is no exception. Check out some of the highlights of the final regulations and learn what you need to know moving forward.  (more…)

Share Button

What’s The Relationship Between Side-Businesses And Tax Deductions?

Friday, January 31st, 2014

Do you or someone you know enjoy knitting or jewelry-making? Or perhaps you do résumé writing or other professional consulting work? If you do any of these as a side business and make a profit, did you know that you can deduct expenses that are ordinary and necessary to your business? If your side business expenses exceed the income for your business, then the loss can be deducted against other income. However, if your loss is from a business that’s not making a profit, then you’re not allowed to deduct your loss against other income.  (more…)

Share Button

Will You Be Paying With Cash, Credit Or Bitcoins?

Wednesday, January 29th, 2014

Bitcoin has been all over the news lately, and you may be asking – what exactly is it? Bitcoin is a virtual currency. Only existing online, it’s powered by its users and not backed by any government agency. This new currency offers anonymity, convenience, helps facilitate international commerce and can fluctuate in value. Check out www.bitcoin.org for more information and frequently asked questions.  (more…)

Share Button

What Are 6 Things You Can Do To Improve The Health Of Your Business in 2014?

Monday, December 30th, 2013

Are you out of breath from the impact the economy had on your business during the last several years? Is it time to develop some New Year’s resolutions that will make a difference in your business? Adopting a new diet, jumping on the treadmill or committing to run a half marathon are common items on the “personal” resolution menu. However, is it time to add energy and resources to your resolutions in order to improve the health of your business?  (more…)

Share Button

Obamacare Exchange Enrollment Deadline Extended One Day

Monday, December 23rd, 2013

Things are continually changing on the Obamacare front. I wanted to provide you with a brief update since my blog post from last Friday. In last Friday’s post, I explained that today (Dec. 23, 2013) was the last day for individuals to sign-up for insurance through the federal government (“the Exchange”) that would take effect on Jan. 1, 2014. However, the Obama administration announced today that it is extending the deadline by one day. If you’re interested in obtaining health insurance through the Exchange, you can now enroll through tomorrow, Tuesday, Dec. 24. For more information on the deadline extension, view this recent CNNMoney article(more…)

Share Button

Do I Need To Have Health Care Coverage Before Jan. 1, 2014?

Friday, December 20th, 2013

Christmas is upon us, but you know what else is? The federal deadline to pay for exchange insurance that’s effective Jan. 1, 2014. Yes, that’s right. If you want health insurance through the federal government, you’ve got until Monday, Dec. 23, 2013, to apply and pay for it. Some insurance companies have delayed this deadline to Jan. 10, 2014 – but not all. So don’t wait – make sure you’re covered today.  (more…)

Share Button

How Can Manufacturers Deal With Competition?

Friday, December 20th, 2013

Contrary to popular belief, the manufacturing industry is alive and well. For years, we’ve heard that it’s a “dying” industry. But that’s just not so. In fact, many manufacturers are enjoying higher profitability than 2008 pre-recession levels. However, if your manufacturing business is still young or you’ve hit a rough patch and are starting to see a downward shift in your sales and employment, there’s assistance that you may qualify for to help you get out the rut you’re in.

(more…)

Share Button

Peeling Back The Onion: Answering 3 Popular Obamacare Questions

Thursday, December 12th, 2013

As Obamacare becomes more and more of a reality to individuals, I’m being asked lots of questions. In the past few weeks, I received three questions that I’m finding are common concerns among the people I’ve talked with. I wanted to share these questions and provide some insight into each. So let me peel back the Obamacare “onion” and help you better understand how you may be impacted or what options you have available to you.  (more…)

Share Button

Will There Be Changes To The Small Business Health Care Credit?

Friday, December 6th, 2013

Has your business enjoyed the small business health care credit for the last few years? Well, get ready because changes are coming in 2014.  (more…)

Share Button

How Can You Best Prepare For The Upcoming Tax Season?

Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

It’s the holiday season, and you know what that means. I’m not talking about shopping or decorating or eating until your heart’s content. I’m talking about cleaning out those filing cabinets and getting ready for tax time! The more prepared and organized you can be as you approach tax season, the smoother a process you can create for yourself or your business.  (more…)

Share Button

How Can Franchising Work For You?

Monday, November 25th, 2013

Purchasing a franchise might seem like a very daunting process, enough so that you might not even consider it a possibility for you. However, have you ever considered what advantages buying a franchise might bring to you? Before jumping ahead to the benefits, let’s first look at what exactly franchising is.  (more…)

Share Button

Why Should Your Digital Assets Be Part of Your Estate Plan?

Thursday, November 21st, 2013

Just when you think your estate plan is complete, is it really? Your will gives your personal property to your daughter, Suzie. Great, Suzie gets your laptop and your smartphone. But what happens to your online accounts, emails, Facebook account, iTunes account, that special digital crown won in an online game, and digital pictures stored in the “cloud”? Does Suzie know where to find your usernames or passwords? Even if she does, does she have a right to access the accounts?  (more…)

Share Button

Ohio House Passes Municipal Tax Reform Bill – What Does This Mean For You?

Friday, November 15th, 2013

If you’re tired of spending countless hours and money on getting your local taxes in order, then relief may be on its way. The Ohio House of Representatives recently passed the state’s municipal income tax reform bill (Sub House Bill 5), which seeks to standardize and create more efficiency for Ohio’s patchwork municipal tax system.  (more…)

Share Button

Health Insurance Options: SHOP, Drop, Roll, or Self-insure?

Thursday, November 14th, 2013

You may recall the popular saying, “Stop, Drop and Roll.” This is what we were taught in case a piece of our clothing or hair caught on fire. This same clever saying can (in a roundabout way) be applied to the list of options that businesses now have because of Obamacare. SHOP, Drop, Roll or Self-insure.  (more…)

Share Button

Why Did The IRS Delay The Start Of The 2014 Tax Season?

Wednesday, November 6th, 2013

Recently the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) announced that due to the 16-day government shutdown, they will begin processing tax returns one- to two-weeks later than planned. The original start date was Jan. 21, 2014. With this delay, the tax season could begin no earlier than Jan. 28 or as late as Feb. 4. The IRS will not process paper returns until the official start date, even if they are received before the official start date.  (more…)

Share Button

How Can Contractors Ensure They Have Sufficient Cash Flow?

Monday, October 28th, 2013
As a construction contractor, income taxes are probably the furthest thing from your mind. And you’re probably not too excited about writing big checks to the respective taxing authorities. (more…)
Share Button

What Is The Difference Between Fixed Asset Expensing And Capitalization?

Thursday, October 17th, 2013

If you’re about to acquire, produce or improve real or tangible personal property, and then turn around and use the property in a trade of business for income, stop right there. Under the Internal Revenue Code, you’re required to capitalize certain amounts of money you invested into the property.  (more…)

Share Button

Should I Be Worried About the New 3.8 Percent Medicare Surtax?

Thursday, October 10th, 2013

Obamacare is a complex piece of legislation. And in a recent ABC News/Washington Post poll, 62 percent of Americans said they lack information they need to understand Obamacare and how it will impact them.  (more…)

Share Button

What’s The IRS Up To During The Government Shutdown?

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013

We’ve read for weeks that a government shutdown was possible, but at 12 a.m. this morning, it happened. It has been 17 years since the last government shutdown, and you, along with the rest of the American people, are probably wondering how the shutdown will impact their lives. Fortunately, last week the Internal Revenue Service published “FY 2014 Shutdown Contingency Plan (During Lapsed Appropriations) Non-Filing Season,” a set of guidelines that explains what will go on at the IRS during a shutdown.  (more…)

Share Button

What Should I Do If I Recently Received An IRS Notice About Form 5500 or 8955-SSA?

Wednesday, September 25th, 2013

No one likes to hear from the IRS. But for the roughly 4,000 plan sponsors who have recently received erroneous notices, it’s extremely frustrating. Chances are if you have received a notice telling you that the IRS is assessing a penalty due to your “filing a late or incomplete” Form 5500 or 8955-SSA, it may very well be a mistake.  (more…)

Share Button

How Does Worker Classification Impact Companies In The Oil & Gas Industry?

Thursday, September 12th, 2013

As an employer in the oil and gas industry, historically you may have found it better for your company to hire independent contractors rather than employees. You probably paid your contractors flat day rates rather than an hourly wage. But now these practices are being challenged and companies of all sizes — including oil and gas companies — are being audited by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL).  (more…)

Share Button

Are You Prepared For The Obamacare Deadline On Insurance Marketplace Availability?

Tuesday, September 10th, 2013

The next Obamacare requirement deadline is right around the corner— are you ready? If you’re an employer, the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires you to provide copies of one of the following insurance notices to all of your employees:

  • Employer provides health insurance
  • Employer does not provide health insurance

You must provide these insurance marketplace availability notices to your employees by Oct. 1, 2013.   (more…)

Share Button

How Does DOMA Affect Me?

Friday, September 6th, 2013

This article discusses the changes to individual tax payers that are in a legal same-sex marriage.

Earlier this year the Supreme Court declared that section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) was unconstitutional.  Section 3 of DOMA required that same-sex spouses are to be treated as unmarried for purpose of federal law.  It is now recognized that same-sex couples that were legally married in states that recognize same-sex marriages, will be treated as married for federal tax purposes, even if the state they are currently residing in does not allow same-sex marriages.  The same is true for couples married legally in a foreign jurisdiction.  This now allows for same-sex married couples to file with the status of “married filing jointly” (MFJ) or “married filing separately” (MFS). (more…)

Share Button

What are the Consequences of Having Misclassified Workers?

Thursday, August 29th, 2013

My co-worker, Maribeth Wright, recently wrote a blog post titled, “Are You Properly Classifying Your Workers?”. The post explained how to determine whether a worker is an employee or an independent contractor. The article mentioned that this is a hot button issue with the IRS, as well as other government agencies.  In fact, according to The Kiplinger Tax Letter, the IRS is currently in the process of conducting 6,000 random audits, which are focusing on several payroll and fringe benefit issues – one of which is worker misclassification. (more…)

Share Button

So Is It a Tax Credit Or a Tax Deduction?

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

As you can probably guess if you have seen any courtroom dramas lately, semantics is very important when it comes to the law. One word can totally change the meaning of something, and hence change the thinking or behavior of someone.  Or in the case of tax law, one word can be a “gotcha!” or really change just how useful a provision might be to your business.  Let’s take a look at the small business tax break that is part of the recently passed Ohio budget as an example.  (more…)

Share Button

How Will ACA Federal Exchange Premiums Affect Ohio Small Businesses and Consumers?

Friday, August 16th, 2013

By now, you’ve been hearing a ton about the Affordable Care Act (yes, even from us), and you may be getting tired of all this news. However, it’s critical for you and your business to stay up-to-date on what is changing and what is being decided as it relates to the ACA. The Ohio Department of Insurance (DOI) recently announced in a press release that if you’re an individual consumer who chooses to buy health insurance through the federal government’s insurance exchange, you’ll be paying approximately 41 percent more than what you paid in 2013. And if you’re a business owner, you’ll see somewhere in the ballpark of an 18 percent increase.  (more…)

Share Button

Are You Properly Classifying Your Workers?

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013

You may employ hundreds, if not thousands of employees. Or maybe you only employ three to five. Regardless of the number of employees you have, the way you classify your workers is important to the federal government. Worker status is a hot button issue at the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), and Ohio Job and Family Services, Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation and the U.S. Department of Labor are also challenging the way businesses report their payments to “independent contractors.”  (more…)

Share Button

Some PCORI Fees Due This Wednesday – Do You Owe?

Monday, July 29th, 2013

And so it continues… the next deadline in a long list of fee deadlines for the Affordable Healthcare Act is fast approaching. If you are a business that is self-insured for health care (this includes Health Reimbursement Arrangements/Accounts), and if you had a plan year end on or between Oct. 1, 2012 and Dec. 31, 2012, then you have a new fee to pay by this Wednesday, July 31, 2013. Calendar year plans are included in this because their end date would have been Dec. 31, 2012.
(more…)

Share Button

Need Some Cash Now?

Friday, July 19th, 2013

Are you in the market for a new home? Or maybe you’re looking to purchase a new car for your daughter or son? Don’t have enough cash for a down payment? No problem. There’s a nice workaround that can provide short-term relief for your immediate need.  (more…)

Share Button

Is it time to review your choice of entity?

Wednesday, July 17th, 2013

When is the last time you talked to your accountant about your business’s entity type? If you’re like most business owners, it’s probably not something you regularly think about. Whether you are taxed at the corporate level as a C-corporation, or have a pass-through entity such as an S-corporation or a limited liability company (LLC), there have been plenty of changes in the tax laws recently to warrant at least considering your entity type. (more…)

Share Button

How Has the Fiscal Cliff Deal Impacted Trusts?

Monday, July 8th, 2013

If you deal with trusts, you may soon feel the effects of new higher tax rates and the Medicare surtax. Unfortunately, the fiscal cliff deal was not kind to trusts, trustees or trust beneficiaries. For 2013, a trust will pay income tax at the highest individual tax rate of 39.6 percent when taxable income is more than $11,950. An individual would not pay at this highest tax rate until taxable income exceeds $400,000. In addition, the new 3.8 percent Medicare surtax on net investment income applies to trusts if taxable income exceeds $11,950.  (more…)

Share Button

New Tax on Shale-Related Rent Monies and Landowner Royalty Payments

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2013

If you receive shale-related advance rent monies or landowner royalty payments from an existing well, you should be aware of a potential increase in tax that may hit in 2013. With the passing of the Patient Protection Act, a new tax provision took effect in 2013 – and it could impact the amount of tax you need to pay when you receive your royalty and rent payments. (more…)

Share Button

What Happens if My 401(k) Plan is Out of Compliance with an IRS or DOL Rule?

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2013

With all of the rules in the business world, it sometimes can be difficult to know and understand all of the rules we need to follow – there are a lot of them. So what happens if you find yourself in an unintended situation where your business’s 401(k) plan is out of compliance? Simply put, a plan out of compliance with Internal Revenue Service (IRS) or Department of Labor (DOL) rules is subject to disqualification. But what does that mean? It is very important that you fix any compliance issues when they are identified – whether they are document-related issues, government reporting issues (5500) or plan operational issues. (more…)

Share Button

Is the Ohio Incumbent Workforce Training Voucher Program Coming Back Again?

Friday, March 29th, 2013

A few months ago, businesses across the state were racing to participate in the Ohio Incumbent Workforce Training Voucher Program. The program, which offered $20 million in cash to businesses that provide certain types of employee training, seemed almost too good to be true. It was true, but it was too good to last. The whole $20 million was initially claimed the first day of the program!

If you’ve got expensive training costs and didn’t get a piece of the $20 million last time, don’t fret.  Ohio will be rolling out another round of the Ohio Incumbent Workforce Training Voucher Program – this time with a $30 million pie! This second round of the program will provide funds for trainings that will take place between July 1, 2013, and June 31, 2014. The official kick-off date for the applications has not yet been announced, but state officials hope to go live in May or June. (more…)

Share Button

How Does Getting Divorced Impact Your Taxes?

Friday, March 15th, 2013

Like so many Hollywood couples these days, maybe you are finding yourself a newly divorced person. With all the legal shenanigans that can happen during a divorce proceeding, have you taken the time to consider some of the more practical matters related to your finances? There are several tax-related items and helpful advice tidbits to be discovered after a change in your marital status. (more…)

Share Button

How Do You Make Your Charitable Contributions Count?

Tuesday, March 5th, 2013

Tax deductions aren’t the only reason that you make charitable contributions – but they’re a nice perk!  Unfortunately, the IRS has been cracking down on the documentation required for charitable contribution deductions.  Here’s what you need to know to make sure that your charitable contributions get you the deductions that you deserve. (more…)

Share Button

Did Your Company Miss Out on the Ohio Incumbent Workforce Training Voucher Program?

Tuesday, February 12th, 2013

Don’t Give Up Yet!

Applications for Ohio’s Incumbent Workforce Training Voucher Program were accepted on Monday, January 7, 2013. By the end of the day, Ohio officials said they received applications with requests exceeding the $20 million allotted for fiscal 2013. Funds were awarded on a first-come, first-served basis, so if you weren’t one of the first, you might have missed out on this opportunity for your company. But don’t give up yet…

There will be another opportunity for you to secure your piece of the pie as a second round of applications, for fiscal 2014, will be accepted after June 30 for an additional $30 million. While the exact date that applications will be accepted are not yet known, we do know what the applications will look like, how the application process will work and what information you will need to have ready to submit your application.

Why wait? Begin pulling your information together now so that you will be ready the second time around. (more…)

Share Button

How Do You Keep Your Tax Documents Organized?

Friday, January 25th, 2013

It’s mid-January. Statistically, most Americans have already abandoned their New Year’s resolutions – those promises you make to yourself to hit the gym, get more sleep and read your favorite accounting blog every day (hey, it was worth a shot). But if you resolved to be more organized in 2013, don’t give up on it just yet – at least not until April 15.

This tax filing season carries extra challenges, thanks to the late passage of the “Fiscal Cliff” tax laws. The IRS isn’t going to be able to process tax returns until around February 1, which gives us a much smaller window of opportunity.

Follow these tips to stay organized this tax season and hopefully experience a few fewer headaches with Uncle Sam’s name on them. (more…)

Share Button

Do You Have to Take a 2012 Required Minimum Distribution?

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013

ACT FAST: Limited Time Offer for RMDs

Thanks to a hot-off-the-presses provision in the new tax law, taxpayers over 70 ½ have a very limited window to address 2012 required minimum distributions (RMDs) from their retirement accounts.

Here’s what happened: an incentive for donating your RMDs directly to charity tax-free expired in 2011, so at the end of 2012 many of you weren’t sure what to do. Some of you may have taken your RMD as usual and used that money toward regular living expenses, but other retirees who typically donate their RMD to charity may have taken a different approach. (more…)

Share Button

What Does the Fiscal Cliff Deal Mean for You and Your Business?

Friday, January 4th, 2013

By now you’ve heard that last minute actions by Congress and the President pulled us off the brink of the fiscal cliff. But, do you know what the American Taxpayer Relief Act means for you and your business?

Overall, the deal is good news for most Americans. While it’s true that the tax rates for 99 percent of taxpayers will not change, everyone who pays payroll taxes will see a slight increase. Here’s what you, as an individual taxpayer, should expect in the year to come: (more…)

Share Button

Does Ohio Have an Estate Tax?

Friday, December 21st, 2012

Recently, Ohio eliminated the Ohio estate tax.  The estates of individuals who die after January 1, 2013 will not be subject to the Ohio estate tax. (more…)

Share Button

What Difference Does a Day Make?

Wednesday, December 19th, 2012

How do you plan for an uncertain future?  Very carefully.  That’s the advice that we’re giving to our clients as they to prepare for the tax law changes that are coming on January 1, 2013.

We can’t see into the future, but it looks like rates will go up, on lots of different types of income, in 2013.  Unless changes happen, your rates will be significantly higher on January 1 than on December 31.  What difference does a day make?  Perhaps as much as a 29.4 percentage point jump in your taxes. (more…)

Share Button

How Can You Prepare for 2013 Tax Hikes?

Monday, December 10th, 2012

2012 Year-End Tax Tips

2012 is almost over and 2013 tax policy hasn’t yet been set. With so much media coverage about expiring tax cuts, increasing tax rates, and the looming fiscal cliff, CPAs and business owners alike are worried about what the New Year will bring. All we want for Christmas is sound 2013 tax policy!

Currently, President Obama is struggling to rally a squabbling Congress; without agreement, big tax hikes are coming. Unfortunately, this might not happen until the New Year – after the higher rates have kicked in. So, what’s a taxpayer to do? You can write a letter to Santa asking him to make Congress come to an agreement or you can act now to help save money and insulate your business from expected tax hikes. Here’s what you might want to consider with the help of your CPA: (more…)

Share Button

How Do You Change Your State of Domicile?

Friday, December 7th, 2012

Trying to plug yawning budget deficits, states are fighting a never ending battle for revenue. One common weapon in this battle: the increased enforcement of tax laws. Areas that were overlooked in the past now face heightened scrutiny. One area under the microscope: analyzing individuals’ domiciles. The purpose of this analysis: to find more people to tax. (more…)

Share Button

How Does the IRS Treat Property Repair Expenses?

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

Tax treatment of property repairs has long frustrated business owners and accountants alike. The system has been confusing, hard to follow and seemingly eternally inconsistent. Recent changes to the Internal Revenue Code have streamlined the treatments of property repairs, but not all the changes are as taxpayer-friendly as you may have hoped. (more…)

Share Button

How Do You Prepare for Uncertain 2013 Tax Rates?

Wednesday, November 7th, 2012

As we approach the end of 2012, there is much uncertainty regarding tax legislation. Tax rates, exemptions, credits and deductions are likely to change for both businesses and individuals, but no one yet knows which of the predicted changes will really come to pass. How do you prepare for this uncertain future? Take advantage of the 2012 rates while you still can and plan for contingencies in 2013 and beyond. (more…)

Share Button

How Could Ohio’s Election Impact Severance Tax?

Monday, November 5th, 2012

Every four years, national politics takes center stage here in Ohio. You can’t turn on the radio or t.v. without being inundated with presidential, senatorial or congressional election ads. But there are issues a bit closer to home that are equally important to us.

Of the many state and local issues getting lost in the commotion is one that can have a big impact on Ohio’s oil and gas industry – Governor Kasich‘s proposed severance tax change. Initially introduced in March, this is not a new issue. It was tabled in the lead up to the election and is likely to be reconsidered once the Ohio House and Senate return for their next session. (more…)

Share Button

What Accounting Methods Do Contractors Use?

Thursday, November 1st, 2012

Usually when you hear the words “accounting method,” you think of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). However, you should not overlook the impact that accounting methods have in the tax world, especially for construction contractors. (more…)

Share Button

What are the Tax Rules for Gamblers?

Thursday, October 25th, 2012

With the new Cleveland Horeshoe Casino, gaming is becoming big business in Ohio.  From occasional slot machine players to poker pros, Ohioans are experiencing gambling and all the wins and losses that come with it.  While residents of Las Vegas may already be familiar with the IRS’s tax treatment of gambling wins and losses, Ohio gamers might not be  The IRS has special rules for gaming income and losses, which I’ll describe below, but the general rule is this: gambling winnings are taxable. (more…)

Share Button

How Can Employers in Ohio, Kentucky, Michigan & Tennessee Get a FICA Tax Refund?

Thursday, October 18th, 2012

Downsizing by companies has been a fact of life over the past several years.  As a part of this process companies may have paid severance payments to employees who were involuntarily terminated due to either: (1) reduction in force (“RIF”) initiatives or (2) plant closings or other similar conditions.

Historically the IRS has argued that such payments are subject to FICA tax withholding in addition to income tax withholding at the time of payment.  In 2002, the Court of Federal Claims in CSX Corp v. U.S. held that severance payments made by CSX were not subject to FICA tax and thus CSX was entitled to refunds of amounts previously withheld.   The IRS appealed and in 2008 the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit reversed the Court of Claims holding that such payments were subject to FICA tax. (more…)

Share Button

Should You Maximize Cash Flow or Minimize Income Taxes?

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

“Do I need to buy, and expense, equipment or a vehicle before the end you the year to save income tax?” Every CPA involved in business tax planning hears some variation of that question several times, on an annual basis. Our first question back to you is, “Do you need it?” (more…)

Share Button

You Got a Tax Notice… Now What?!

Wednesday, September 19th, 2012

You know the feeling well… you’re just going about your business, walking out to the mailbox to pick up the daily mail. For some reason, the pile feels a bit heavier today. And as you sort through the junk and the magazines and the bills, you find that you’ve received a little love note in the form of a tax notice from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). No wonder the mail is so heavy today… the IRS is looking for more of your well-earned money. (more…)

Share Button

What Does the Medicate Surtax Mean for Employers?

Friday, September 14th, 2012

Even though the Supreme Court’s decision was a few months ago at this point, health care reform is still getting a lot of coverage in the media.  Individuals and business owners are still trying to get their hands around what it will mean for them and what they’ll have to do to comply with the new law.

Most discussions about how health care reform will impact taxes have centered on the so called “Individual Mandate.”  But, health care reform will lead to other tax changes, too.  One such tax chance is the addition of a 0.9% Medicare tax surcharge. (more…)

Share Button

Is It Fair to Require Online Retailers to Collect and Remit State Sales Tax?

Wednesday, September 12th, 2012

Recently we’ve been hearing calls for everyone to pay their fair share of taxes. One regular target: online retailers, who are being criticized for failing to collect and remit sales tax. But, like many questions of tax policy, this one is more complicated than headlines might lead you to believe. (more…)

Share Button

How Do You Value Property for an Estate in Ohio?

Wednesday, September 5th, 2012

Recently, a reader shared with us that she inherited property in both Ohio and Florida. She had a pretty specific question related to the value of the Ohio property. That question made me think there may be more people who don’t know how to handle newly inherited property for estate tax purposes. Hence, I’m going to provide some general estate information I hope will help.

According to Ohio law, “the value of any property included in the gross estate shall be the price at which such property would change hands between a willing buyer and a willing seller, neither being under any compulsion to buy or sell and both having reasonable knowledge of relevant facts.”

Now, let me put that in simpler terms. If there is real estate in an estate, then you need to claim its fair value. That value is the amount the property would sell for assuming both the buyer and seller know about the property and neither was pressured to either buy or sell. (more…)

Share Button

How Do You Qualify for Tax Credits and Incentives?

Wednesday, August 8th, 2012

Don’t Leave Money on the Table

If your business is thinking of hiring or training employees or investing in fixed assets, you might qualify for a tax credit.  But, tax credits need to be considered up front.  Once you miss the boat on applying for them, it’s too late, even if you would have been a perfect candidate.

Securing these types of credits and incentives can dramatically improve your return on investment. (more…)

Share Button

A Use Tax Audit Could Cost You Big

Friday, July 27th, 2012

The State of Ohio is looking for additional tax dollars, and they’re not going to give you the benefit of the doubt if your business is audited for use tax. But you may be able to avoid a use tax audit if you qualify for a one-time opportunity to enter into the State of Ohio’s amnesty program. (more…)

Share Button

Do You Need to Report Health Care Benefits on W-2s?

Thursday, July 26th, 2012

“Obama Care is terrible!”  “Health care reform is great!”  Depending on your political stripes, you may have differing views on the Affordable Care Act.  Regardless of whether you love it or hate it, health care reform will impact your business in the years to come.  (more…)

Share Button

Now is the Time to Gift to Your Family

Thursday, July 19th, 2012

Expiring Provisions Will Cost you Big

There is a gentleman I know who started a successful business and has become a wealthy man. He always tells me that he wants to provide for  his children and grandchildren – however, he needs to wait to make sure his wife will have the money the need to live comfortably for the foreseeable future. It’s something he adds to his to-do list for the fantasy “next year.”

It’s respectable that he’s worried about the economy, and the impact it may have on his personal lifestyle. However, Uncle Sam is taking the luxury of waiting away from many people. If you’ve ever considered making a gift, there may not ever be a more opportune time. (more…)

Share Button

How Could Ohio Medicaid Expansion Impact Your Business?

Wednesday, July 11th, 2012

Recently, we told you about some of the immediate tax consequences that you, as a business owner, can expect because of the Supreme Court’s decision on health care reform.  If you read How Does the Health Care Reform Decision Impact Your Business, you know that your healthcare costs and Medicare taxes are likely go up.  But, did you know that you might need to pay more for Medicaid, too? (more…)

Share Button

How Does the Health Care Reform Decision Impact Your Business?

Friday, June 29th, 2012

By now you’ve probably seen the headlines that the Supreme Court announced its decision on health care reform and are wondering what it all means. What parts of the laws have been upheld? As a business owner, what will you need to do to comply with them?

In general, all of the tax provisions in the health care reform laws have been defended and will continue to be phased in over the next two years. Here’s what you need to know about what that means for you and your business. (more…)

Share Button

What do InvestOhio Changes Mean for You?

Thursday, June 28th, 2012

If you’re a tax payer who’s invested in a small business through the InvestOhio program, or if you’re a business owner who’s received a credited investment, you could find yourself impacted by new program changes or fees. (more…)

Share Button

Do You Have Ohio Use Tax Exposure?

Tuesday, June 26th, 2012

Commonly Overlooked Ohio Use Tax Liabilities

For the last year, we’ve been telling you about the State of Ohio’s efforts to step up enforcement of its use tax law. Use tax can be thought of as a companion tax to sales tax. In many cases, if you didn’t pay Ohio sales tax, chances are you will owe Ohio use tax. (more…)

Share Button

Healthcare Reform and W-2 Reporting

Wednesday, June 6th, 2012

Healthcare Reform’s Impact on Employers

The Affordable Care Act (Healthcare Reform) put into law a number of provisions which impact employers. These provisions are being rolled out slowly over the next few years. One provision that’s new for 2012, regarding W-2 reporting of health insurance costs, applies only to large employers. As this provision is likely to get a lot of attention in 2012, it’s important to know, up front, if your business is required to comply. (more…)

Share Button

Are Tax Credits Available for Hiring Veterans?

Friday, May 25th, 2012

Memorial Day is a great time to think about our veterans and what we can do to show our thanks for all that they’ve done for our country. One way to show your thanks: hire a veteran. All too often, our men and women returning from active duty come home to a weak economy and limited job prospects. But, as an employer, you have the unique ability to help ease their transition to civilian life – by giving them a job and a chance.

Hiring a veteran can be good for the veteran, the community and your business. The VOW to Hire Heroes Act of 2011 provides work opportunity tax credits to businesses that hire certain veterans. (more…)

Share Button

How many kinds of tax amnesty does Ohio have?

Friday, May 11th, 2012
A lot of people call our office looking for information about Ohio tax amnesty.  When we ask them which one they mean, they say, “You mean there’s more than one?!”

Actually, there are two types of Ohio tax amnesty running right now:

  • Ohio General Tax Amnesty
  • Ohio Consumer’s Use Tax Amnesty (more…)
Share Button

How Do You Get Your Social Security Statement?

Thursday, May 10th, 2012

If you’re not yet nearing retirement age, Social Security probably means two things to you: the amount of money that disappears from your pay checks and the annual statements that you get in the mail. If you’ve ever taken the time to read these statements, you’ve probably learned some neat things about your finances – like your lifelong earning history and the amount of Social Security benefits that you’d receive if you were to need them right now. (more…)

Share Button