Archive for the ‘Retirement Plan’ Category

Why would I want to listen to a podcast from an accounting firm?

Wednesday, October 7th, 2015
Doug Feller of Investment Partners Featured on Unsuitable on Rea Radio Podcast - Ohio CPA Firm

Mark VanBenschoten (left) talks with Doug Feller, a principal and financial advisor with Investment Partners, talks about wealth enhancement and investment tactics for an upcoming episode of Unsuitable on Rea Radio, a new financial and business advisory podcast from Rea & Associates. Click here to learn more about Unsuitable on Rea Radio.

I know what you’re thinking – listening to a podcast from an accounting firm is probably about as entertaining and insightful as watching paint dry. But Unsuitable on Rea Radio isn’t your typical accounting podcast, and here’s why.

Real, Simple Solutions

Who doesn’t like a good story? What about one that leaves you with greater insight into the financial wellness of your own company? And if you had a better idea of how other successful entrepreneurs manage their wealth, wouldn’t you try to follow their lead?

The professionals at Rea have seen a lot over the last several decades and they are willing to open the curtain just enough to provide you with the information to forge your own success. And on Unsuitable, they do just that.

An Effective Kick In The Pants

Unsuitable offers a little something for everybody and I am confident that this is a show that will not only help provide you with more clarity, but will motivate you to take the next step as a professional and as a business leader.

Look at what has already been discussed in the first four episodes:

And this is just the beginning. Look for episodes highlighting investment strategies, Affordable Care Act compliance and retirement preparedness – just to name a few.

Accountants Like To Laugh Too

This may come as a surprise to many since those in the accounting profession tend to be thought of as dry, stuffy, number-crunching fanatics, but that’s just not true – well, most of the time. The Rea team consists of some pretty humorous, outgoing folks and I think that the diverse sense of humor of our team shines through. Mark Van Benschoten, the host of the show, helps a lot, of course. He does an excellent job addressing each guest and makes them feel comfortable … then the show gets really good.

Just The Right Length

Our firm has 11 offices throughout Ohio, which means I do a lot of driving. When I’m on the road I like to listen to podcasts – and there are a lot of them out there! What I really like about Unsuitable, is that it’s long enough to be really informative and wraps up nicely before it reaches the point where I am wishing it would end. In fact, when it does end I find myself wanting to start the next one. Mark and his guests get right to the point of the show, provide examples and offer hard-hitting advice in a concise, enjoyable format – all while having a great time and avoiding stuffy accounting jargon.

Go to now and start listening or subscribe to Unsuitable on Rea Radio on iTunes or SoundCloud. I also want to encourage you to use #ReaRadio to join the conversation on Twitter and Facebook.

By Lee Beall, CPA (Dublin office)

Click here and start listening to Unsuitable on Rea Radio now!


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Don’t Like Your Retirement Plan Design?

Friday, August 28th, 2015

Time’s Running Out to Establish, Alter Your Plan

Time's Running Out to Establish, Alter Your Retirement Plan Design - Rea & Associates - Ohio CPA Firm

If you haven’t made time to speak with a retirement plan specialist recently to make sure that your retirement plan still addresses your company’s unique needs, there’s a chance you are missing out on a more cost-effective solution. Your retirement plan team can quickly run some illustrative numbers to compare your SEP against a 401(k) plan to reveal whether a better option exists for your business.

Your SIMPLE IRA or Safe Harbor 401(k) plan isn’t going to establish or change itself and if you want yours to be effective in 2015, you need to know that an Oct. 1 deadline is looming – as though you really needed something else to worry about. Fortunately, a retirement plan expert will not only help you meet your deadline, they can make sure your plan is optimized to ensure maximum results.

If you’ve never taken the time to really understand how valuable your retirement plan can be for your business, this is your chance. Read on to learn six other reasons why you might want to pick up the phone and schedule a meeting with a retirement plan expert today.

Read: Why You Should Review Your Retirement Plan Documents Now

Six Reasons To Call Your Retirement Plan Administrator

  1. You have no retirement plan at all. Offering your employees a retirement plan is more than just a great recruitment tool; it’s an excellent way to make your company’s profits go further. Read Retirement Plan Design: One Size Does Not Fit All to learn more about how a retirement plan might help bolster your business’s growth strategy.
  2. You have a SEP Plan with more than two employees. If you haven’t made time to speak with a retirement plan specialist recently to make sure that your retirement plan still addresses your company’s unique needs, there’s a chance you are missing out on a more cost-effective solution. Your retirement plan team can quickly run some illustrative numbers to compare your SEP against a 401(k) plan to reveal whether a better option exists for your business.
  3. You are a business owner who is able to maximize deferrals every year with a SIMPLE IRA. If so, it may be time to consider a Safe Harbor 401(k) plan in 2016 for additional tax deferral. For more insight into how this option can work for you, read Safe Harbor 401(k) Plans Provide Smooth Sailing.
  4. You have a 401(k) but receive corrective distributions every year. You may be missing out on a retirement plan design that can not only alleviate this problem, but can help you maximize the benefits your business receives for being active participants in your employees’ retirement strategy. Access Safe Harbor FAQ here.
  5. You maximize deferrals every year under your Safe Harbor 401(k) plan but offer no profit sharing option. A better plan design for business owners in this situation might be to maximize profit sharing contributions while limiting the amount that has to be provided to employees. For example, cross-tested profit sharing plans may save you money if your company’s staff consists primarily of younger employees. A retirement plan expert can help you identify a plan that helps address the uniqueness of your business.
  6. You are maxing out your profit sharing plan every year. It’s time to add a cash balance option to your existing retirement plan. This is a great option for business owners in this position, because it allows for much higher employer contribution deductibles for owners. Click here to learn more about how these plans can help your business.

Take control of your retirement plan today. Email a Rea & Associates retirement plan expert to find out what you have been missing.

By Steve Renner, QKA (New Philadelphia office)

Check out these articles for more helpful retirement plan advice specifically for small and midsize businesses.

Like Losing Your Wallet – Only Worse
Retirement Roulette
The ‘Van Halen’ Philosophy of Retirement Plan Compliance

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Like Losing Your Wallet – Only Worse

Friday, July 31st, 2015
Retirement Plan Returns- Ohio CPA Firm

Typically, owners of businesses and their spouses who fail to file their annual retirement plan returns are in full-scale crisis mode – and rightfully so, since missing this deadline results in a penalty that’s about the size of a small fortune.

For most of us, misplacing our keys, losing sight of our shoes and occasionally forgetting to pay the phone bill on time is not a catastrophic phenomenon. It happens; and most likely we will freak out for a minute, find what we were looking for and move on – only to repeat our dysfunctional routine countless times over the course of a lifetime. Forgetting to file your retirement plan returns on the other hand … well, let’s just say that’s typically not a stress-free event.

Read Also: Do You Know What Your Retirement Plan Is Costing You?

Typically, owners of businesses and their spouses who fail to file their annual retirement plan returns (Form 5500-EZ) are in full-scale crisis mode – and rightfully so, since missing this deadline results in a penalty that’s about the size of a small fortune. To be more precise, in years past, those who failed to meet their filing obligation could face a penalty totaling up to $15,000 per return. Fortunately, the IRS recently announced that instead of facing such an extreme late fee, eligible business owners can take advantage of a “low-cost penalty relief program.”

How Much Would You Pay?

The relief initiative, which started as a one-year pilot program in 2014, was tremendously successful, resulting in the collection of about 12,000 late returns. Because of this success, the program secured it’s permanency in May of this year. According to the news release, the program allows eligible business owners and their spouses to file late returns and only pay a $500 penalty for each return submitted with a maximum of $1,500 per plan. Because the IRS caps the maximum penalty at $1,500, applicants are encouraged to include multiple late returns in a single submission.


The IRS says that businesses with plans that cover the owner or the business’s partners (depending on how the business is set up) and their spouses are eligible to take advantage of this low-cost plan. Complete information about the program can be found by clicking here.

Learn More

Remember, your return must be filed annually no later than the end of the seventh month following the close of your plan year. So, for example, if your plan is governed by the calendar-year, as most are, your 2014 return was due today (Friday, July 31, 2015). Did you fail to file your small business’s annual retirement plan returns? Would you like to find out if you qualify for this program? Email a retirement plan expert at Rea & Associates and take control of your IRS debt now.

By Andrea McLane, QKA (Dublin office)

Want to read more about the importance of Retirement Plan Compliance?
Check out these articles:

401(k) Loans and Keeping Your Plan In Compliance
Retirement Roulette
The ‘Van Halen Philosophy’ of Retirement Plan Compliance

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Retirement Plan Design: One Size Does Not Fit All

Monday, May 11th, 2015
Planning Ahead for Retirement Makes All The Difference - Rea & Associates - Ohio CPA Firm

When it comes to your retirement plan, planning ahead can mean the difference between sipping tropical drinks on a beach to taking on a part-time job at 75 to make ends meet. Is your retirement plan advisor working in your best interest?

Do your employees dream of spending their golden years on a sun-drenched beach, sipping tropical drinks from a coconut shell? Or do you think they’re looking forward to taking on a part-time job at age 70 to pay medical bills and their mortgage? Like you, they’re probably expecting an R&R-fueled retirement – but they need your help getting there.

Read Retirement Roulette

An employer-sponsored retirement plan is a great tool for business owners. Not only do retirement plans provide businesses with leverage when it comes to attracting and retaining a skilled workforce, employers that make contributions to their employee’s accounts are entitled to tax incentives – which gives you more control over your company’s cash flow.

From Business Strategy To Retirement Planning

Whether your company presently offers a retirement plan or is planning to beef up its benefits package, work with a retirement plan advisor who can review your options and identify the plan that best addresses your company’s unique challenges. You’ll need to:

  1. Identify The Primary Purpose Of Your Retirement Plan
    Will your retirement plan be used as a recruitment tool or as a tax shelter? While all plans accomplish a little of both, make sure your plan design meets your needs. For example, when a closely held business offers a retirement plan, its primary goal is to provide maximum retirement benefits and income tax deferral to the owners, while minimizing the cost of benefits to the employees. Incorporating a retirement plan into your existing benefit package is also an opportunity to diversify your assets away from the reach of creditors – making you less dependent on the value of your company to provide an income stream in retirement.
  2. Get To Know Your Team
    Does your company hire younger workers? Do you have an established workforce that will retire from your company? Do you have high turnover? What does your projected workforce growth look like? Your plan design should consider your demographic information – and promote the short- and long-term financial wellness of your employees and your business.
  3. Put Your Own Retirement Goals In Perspective
    Your employees aren’t the only ones looking at your employer-sponsored retirement plan as a dependable source of retirement income. You and other key employees will likely use the plan as well. That’s why, during the design phase, your advisor will take a look at the current and projected profitability of your company alongside the ratio of key employees and the company’s other employees.

When all is said and done, your plan design could be the thing that stands between your employees and a comfortable retirement – or it could be what lets them reap the benefits of all their years of hard work.

This is a great time of year to explore your options. Email Rea & Associates to learn more.

By Paul McEwan, CPA, MT, AIFA (New Philadelphia office)


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Retirement Roulette

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2015
Retirement Roulette - Rea & Associates - Ohio CPA Firm

The retirement savings provision outlined in the 2016 Budget Proposal not only provides individual Americans with an opportunity to save, it seeks to provide financial incentives to eligible companies that establish their own 401(k), auto-IRA or that offer another similar retirement plan to their employees by expanding the small business tax credit.

It’s difficult to paint a picture that adequately portrays the retirement readiness of the American people. How prepared the average person is for this phase of their life greatly depends on which report you are reading today. As a whole, however, credible sources indicate that as a population we are simply not prepared to take on the financial responsibility of supporting ourselves later in life, which is a problem that has received a lot of attention from our nation’s leaders.

Last year marked the introduction of myRA, a retirement account program that encourages individuals without access to an employer-sponsored retirement plan to save for their retirement. Developed by the United States Department of the Treasury, myRA seeks to offer a solution to those who “face barriers to saving for retirement.” But that’s not the only chatter heard on Capitol Hill these days, with regard to the retirement savings habits of Americans. Members of Congress have proposed other solutions that they hope will make the retirement picture a little bit brighter.

Read:  Retirement Is Knocking … Are You Ready To Answer The Door?

2016 Budget Proposal Addresses Retirement Savings

The U.S. government’s 2016 Budget Proposal includes provisions that target the promotion of retirement goals.

“Millions of working Americans lack access to a retirement savings plan at work. Fewer than 10 percent of those without plans at work save in a retirement account on their own. In 2015, retirement security will be one of the key topics of the White House Conference on Aging. The Budget would make it easy and automatic for workers to save for retirement through their employer – giving 30 million more workers access to a workplace savings opportunity. The Budget also ensures that long-term part-time employees can participate in their employers’ retirement plans and provides tax incentives to offset administrative expenses for small businesses that adopt retirement plans.”

What is important to note is that, in addition to retirement security, the Proposal focuses on generating government revenue, which would (in part) go toward the creation of new tax benefit programs. The impact, according to the Whitehouse, would result in savings for as many as 30 million American taxpayers.

Today, nearly 78 million working Americans are unable to save for retirement simply because they are not eligible to enroll or because their employer doesn’t offer the opportunity to save for retirement. This Proposal introduces a solution for those who would like to begin saving for their golden years.

For example, one possible scenario outlined within the budget calls for all part time workers (those who have worked for their current employer at least 3 consecutive years and who have worked at least 500 hours during each year of their employment), who are not currently contributing to a retirement plan, to be allowed to contribute to the company’s existing retirement plan without requiring the plan sponsor to add matching contributions for such individuals.

Another is for those who do not have access to an employer-based retirement plan, however, would be automatically enrolled in a separate IRA program, which would be funded by payroll withholdings. Of course, the taxpayer would have the option to opt out of the program.

What’s In It for the Employer?

The retirement savings provision outlined in the 2016 Budget Proposal not only provides individual Americans with an opportunity to save, it seeks to provide financial incentives to eligible companies that establish their own 401(k), auto-IRA or that offer another similar retirement plan to their employees by expanding the small business tax credit.

This provision would also include an additional credit for small businesses that currently offer retirement plans to include an automatic enrollment feature within their plans.

Employees who are still unable to save for retirement will have a third option available. The Budget Proposal calls for the allocation of $6.5 million to the Department of Labor, which would allow a limited number of states to implement state-based auto enroll IRAs or 401(K)-type programs.

Mind the Cap

President Barack Obama’s 2016 Budget Proposal, while ambitious in its initiative to strengthen Social Security and incentivize retirement savings programs for Americans, also includes a provision that had been proposed (and rejected) before. The additional provision seeks to cap (prohibit additional contributions) on IRAs and other tax-preferred retirement plans once they reach a balance of $3.4 million.

According to the president, this step ensures that the individual secures sufficient annual income in retirement while preventing the “overuse” of existing tax advantages by those who are able to contribute additional funds, creating higher balance accounts. The cap would also help the government generate additional revenue because the funds that exceed the $3.4 million cap would now be taxable under this provision.

As always, when it comes to the future of Social Security and the overall retirement readiness of the American people a lot can change in a short amount of time. The 2016 Budget Proposal still has a long way to go before any of the provisions outlined within become reality. It’s important for you to be aware of these provisions and how they could change our current retirement plan landscape.

In the meantime, don’t just wait for changes to happen. Take steps today that will maintain the flexibility of your existing benefit plan while optimizing your company’s current and future ROI. Email the Benefit Plan Audit team at Rea & Associates to learn more.

By Darlene Finzer, CPA, QKA, CSA (New Philadelphia office)


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How To Avoid The Retirement Culture Shock

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015
Retirement Doesn't Have To Hurt Contact Rea & Associates To Learn More - Ohio CPA Firm

When many of us start thinking about the realities of retirement, it’s already too late. Don’t let the “retirement culture shock” sneak up on you, these three tips will help as you attempt to navigate the road to retirement.

If you’re a newly retired American, then you are embarking on a new, exciting phase of your life. For many of you, increased travel, spending more time with grandchildren or pursuing a new hobby may be ways to enjoy this new journey.

Read: How Can I Make The Most of My Retirement?

But before you pack up your things and hop that next plane to Florida, here are three tips to help you avoid the retirement culture shock.

1. Taxes Don’t Vanish At 65

When you were an employee, your taxes were likely withheld from your paycheck. Today, however, is a new day. As a retiree, you no longer have a paycheck from which taxes can be withheld. But there are a few things you can do to make sure you won’t get hit with a large tax bill in April. For example, if you receive a regular pension payment or an annuity, consider withholding your tax payments from those. You also have the option of simply making quarterly estimated tax payments if withholding is not an option.

2. Transfer Your Pension To Avoid Added Tax Cost

If you do have retirement income from a pension plan, make sure to structure the transfer of your pension into an IRA as a direct rollover to avoid an additional tax. Basically, you want to make sure that the check is made out to your IRA and not directly to you, which will ensure that the funds are deposited into your IRA instead of your personal bank account. If you don’t structure your pension plan to disperse your money in this way, the company responsible for your pension payments is required to withhold 20 percent of the funds for the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). When this happens, the IRS will likely see fit to assess a tax to this 20 percent, effectively shrinking your retirement nest egg.

3. Don’t Miss Exclusive Tax Benefits

Retirees are eligible to receive a few nice tax incentives – perhaps to offset your new responsibility of paying your own quarterly estimated taxes and transferring your pension plan payments. Either way, these tax breaks are nothing to grumble about. Here are three tax facts to get you started:

  • If you turned 65 during 2014, your standard deduction increased by $1,550. This means that you can claim $7,750 instead of the $6,200 standard deduction allowed for those younger than 65.
  • For the next three years, taxpayers older than 65 are eligible to receive a reduced phase out of their medical expenses. Those who are older than 65 can deduct qualifying medical expenses to that exceed 7.5 percent of their adjusted gross income. Those younger than 65 can deduct qualifying medical expenses that exceed 10 percent of their adjusted gross income.
  • Self-employed individuals who have Medicare Part B, Part D or supplemental Medicare policies are eligible to claim an above-the-line deduction for these costs.

You have spent so many years putting in long hours, stressing over money and putting your wants and needs second. Retirement is your time. Make sure you are in control of your finances – and your future. Email Rea & Associates to learn how to make your money go further in retirement.

By Dana Launder, CPA (Cambridge office)


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The ‘Van Halen Philosophy’ of Retirement Plan Compliance

Thursday, March 5th, 2015
David Lee Roth Performs

Singer David Lee Roth once said he “found the SIMPLE life ain’t so simple.: We think the same can be said about retirement plan compliance.
Pictured above: David Lee Roth performs with classic rock band Van Halen during a concert in 2012. Photo by Robert Yager

While I don’t really believe David Lee Roth and Van Halen were thinking about SEP or SIMPLE IRA retirement plans when they performed their 1978 classic rock song, “Runnin’ with the Devil,” the connection between the two is an easy one to make.

“I found the SIMPLE life ain’t so simple”

The many small business clients we work with who choose to sponsor these types of retirement plans do so because they are inexpensive to administer and they enable our clients to provide a reasonable retirement benefit for themselves and to their employees. However, these plans are far from simple to operate and, if you’re not on your game, can be full of costly traps. The “Devil” is in the details as they say.

Top 5 SEP and SIMPLE Compliance Failures

Here is a rundown of the top five compliance failures we see. If not identified and corrected in a timely manner, these compliance concerns can result in the loss of favorable tax benefits for you and your employees or potentially large penalties and corrective contributions for your business.

  1. No Current Plan Document – All retirement plans require a governing document that identifies the plan sponsor (and any related employers) and defines the plan’s terms. The IRS provides a model document for you to use for these types of plans, but you have to complete it and keep it in your plan files.
  2. All Employees are Not Covered – Both SEPs and SIMPLE plans require that all employees (including employees of related employers) meeting a minimum eligibility requirement be covered and that they receive the same contribution (as a percentage of their compensation). Other than for minimal service and age requirements specified in the plan document, no other employees may be excluded.
  3. Using the Wrong Definition of Compensation – Compensation used to determine the contributions that need to be made to the plan generally includes all wages, bonuses, tips, commissions and any elective salary deferral contributions, and is limited to a certain dollar amount depending on the year (for 2014 the limit was $260,000).
  4. Untimely Employee Notices and No Summary Plan Description – Sponsors of SIMPLE IRA plans need to tell employees before the beginning of each year whether they intend to make a  match contribution or a profit sharing contribution . Eligible employees must also receive a summary of the basic SEP or SIMPLE plan provisions.
  5. Untimely Remittance of Employee Salary Deferrals – All employee contributions must be remitted to the IRA of each participant within 30 days after the month in which the employee would have otherwise received the money.

A great time to review your compliance with retirement laws and regulations is during tax time at year end. Whether you need help understanding your plan design options or compliance requirements as a retirement plan sponsor, help is available. Email Rea & Associates for more information.

By Paul McEwan, CPA, MT, AIFA (New Philadelphia office)


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File Faster With This Tax Prep Checklist

Tuesday, January 20th, 2015

It’s that time of year again – time to gather your information and prepare to file your tax return. If you want the process to go smoothly, make sure to gather and organize your information before sitting down with your tax preparer. You may be surprised how fast the entire filing process goes if you spend a little time preparing!

Here’s a list of some items to compile before you get started.

Personal Information

Hopefully you know YOUR social security number and date of birth by heart. But do you know your spouse’s SSN? Your kids? Make sure you remember to bring the social security numbers and birth dates of everybody who will be claimed on your tax return.

Income Info

While your W-2 is important, there are many other pieces of information you will need to collect before you will be able to get started. Gather the following pieces of relevant information:

  • W-2s for you and your spouse.
  • Investment income: This type of income will be listed on various 1099 forms including –INT, -DIV, -B, etc). You may also have K-1s and stock option information to provide to your tax preparer.
  • Income received from state and local income tax refunds and/or unemployment. This income can be found on the Form 1099-G.
  • Gather information about any alimony you may have received.
  • If you are a business owner or farmer, don’t forget to provide a profit/loss statement and capital equipment information.  And if you use your home for business, your tax preparer will need to know the size of your house, the size of your office and what you have paid to maintain your home and office.
  • You will need to provide your IRA/pension distributions as well. This information will be provided to you on Forms 1099-R or 8606.
  • If you rent a home or other type of property, be sure to gather that information that proves the profit or losses you realized as a result of the rental.
  • Be sure to claim any Social Security benefits you may have received. This information is found on Form SSA-1099.
  • If you sold your house in 2014, you must provide your tax provider with Form 1099-C, which will include the income you received from the sale of the property. Your preparer will also take the home’s original cost and cost of improvements, the escrow closing statement and cancelled debt information into consideration.
  • Some other information you will need to pass along to your tax preparer includes items such as jury duty, gambling winnings, scholarships, etc.

Adjustments To Your Income

Now that you have collected all the information you can to adequately identify your income in 2014, some adjustments may need to be made. Making the following adjustments to your income may help increase your tax refund or lower the amount you owe to the government. If you have documentation of any of the following information, be sure to bring them to your appointment.

  • IRA contributions
  • Student loan interest
  • Medical Savings Account contributions
  • Moving expenses
  • Self-employed health insurance payments
  • Pension plans such as SEP and SIMPLE
  • Alimony you paid
  • Educator expenses

Itemized tax deductions and credits

This is another way to increase your refund or reduce what you owe. The following deductions and credits help lower the tax burden on individuals. Be sure to collect this information before filing your return.

  • Child care costs – child care provider’s name, address, tax ID number and amount paid
  • Education costs – these can be found on Form 1098-T
  • Adoption costs – the SSN of the child as well as legal, medical and transportation costs associated with the adoption
  • Home mortgage interest and points you paid, which can be found on Form 1098
  • Investment interest expense
  • Charitable donations that were made to not-for-profit organizations. Make sure you have the amounts and value of the donated property, and any out-of-pocket expenses you may have accrued in your effort to make the donation, including transportation costs. Include receipts for any contribution over $250

o   Losses you realized as a result of casualty and loss (the cost of the damage and insurance reimbursements

  • Medical and dental expenses
  • Energy credits
  • Other deductions include items such as union dues, unreimbursed employee expenses, such as unreimbursed employee expenses

New for 2014 returns

For the first time, you will need to provide information about your health insurance coverage to your tax preparer. Be prepared to answer questions such as these:

  • Was everyone claimed on your tax return covered by health insurance?

o   If not, why?

  • Did you or anyone on your return obtain health insurance coverage through or through a state run exchange in 2014?

o   If yes, did any of those individuals receive a premium tax subsidy, cost reduction, or premium tax credit? If yes, provide Form 1095-A.

It’s likely that you have already started receiving tax forms in the mail from various places. It’s easy to misplace these documents if you’re not careful. If you haven’t already, set aside a place for these items until you have collected them all. Once you have everything you need, you can set an appointment to file your taxes with your financial advisor or tax preparer. For additional tax information, or to speak with a tax expert, email Rea & Associates.

By Lesley Mast, CPA (Wooster office)


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Six Things 401k Plan Sponsors Need To Do Now

Friday, January 16th, 2015
2015 Retirement Plan Deadlines - Ohio CPA Firm

Mark your calendars and don’t forget these 2015 retirement plan deadlines. Click on the image to easily see what is due and when to file.

January may be flying by, but the New Year is still fresh. This is still a great time to make sure that the qualified 401k plan you offer your employees helps them effectively save for retirement and remains qualified. Not sure where to start? Here are six ways to get the most out of your 401k plan:

1. Review Your Match Formula

An employer match can be critical to helping your employees meet their retirement goals and stretching the match formula is a great way to entice employees to save more. Instead of matching 100 percent on the first 2 percent of deferrals, consider changing your contribution formula to 50 percent on the first 4 percent of deferrals, or 25 percent on the first 8 percent of deferrals instead. Each one of these formulas will result in a 2 percent wage cost to you, the employer, but changing the formula may encourage additional employee saving. Instead of saving 4 percent of their income (2 percent employee income plus 2 percent employer match), the employee may be motivated to increase contributions to their retirement plan to 10 percent (8 percent employee income plus 2 percent employer match). Contact your TPA to discuss different strategies.

2. Check Your Contribution Limits

Did you know that the 401(k) and 403(b) plan deferral limits have increased to $18,000? Employees older than 50, now have the option to defer an additional $6,000 of their wages toward retirement. Encourage your employees to review their payroll deduction to ensure that they are on target to meet their personal savings goals.

3. Offer Your 401(k) Plan To All Eligible Employees

If your 401(k) plan has an entry date of Jan. 1, be sure all newly eligible employees were provided the opportunity to participate in the plan. Even if you have an employee who doesn’t want to participate, I recommend that you obtain a signed election form that indicates a 401(k) election of “0 percent.” By doing this, you have documentation that they employee was offered the chance to participate, even though they decided not to.

4. Provide Employee Census To Your TPA

Your third party administrator (TPA) needs yearly plan census information to conduct compliance testing, verify 401(k) and to calculate matching contributions and profit sharing allocations. The deadline for most compliance tests is March 15.

5. Check Your Fidelity Bond

The Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) requires a fidelity bond for every plan fiduciary and for those who handle the funds or property of a plan. The bond must be at least 10 percent of the company’s plan assets. It’s a good idea to ensure that your bond is still meeting the 10 percent minimum requirement.

6. Restate Your Plan Document

Prototype documents for 401(k) plans currently are in a restatement window; therefore, if your plan uses a prototype document, it must be updated to meet new IRS standards. This document restatement period is a great time to examine your plan provisions. For example, do you want to change eligibility requirements or add a loan provision that you have contemplated adding in the past? This is a good time to make those changes. The deadline for restating 401(k) prototype documents is April 30, 2016. Managing your company’s retirement plan can be confusing or overwhelming at times, but it doesn’t have to be. Email Rea & Associates today to learn more. By Steve Renner, QKA (New Philadelphia office)

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Take Control Of Your Financial Wellness In 2015

Monday, January 5th, 2015

Are you still looking for the perfect New Year’s resolution? What about challenging yourself with one that could put you financially ahead? Here are 15 ways you can start your year off on the right foot.

15 Tips For A Prosperous 2015

Adjust your 401(k) plan contribution.

If you have a 401(k) plan, your contribution limit will increase to $18,000 in 2015, and if you’re 50 years or older, you can contribute an additional $6,000 into your plan. When it comes to retirement savings, every little bit helps, so even if you can’t afford to contribute the maximum, at least consider increasing your contribution a little bit over what you put into it last year.

Pay off your debt.

Make 2015 the year you pay off all debts. Once you settle past debts, it will be easier to save for future expenses and retirement. For example, do you have credit card debt? Pay off the cards with the highest interest rates first. Once you have caught up, make it your goal to pay any outstanding balance monthly.

Set up a budget and follow it.

Review your monthly income and expenses and allocate money toward savings, debt resolution and other financial goals. Once you have a plan in place, stick to it. Try to set aside some time to review your budget to make sure you are on track.

Build a “rainy day” fund.

Some people say that you should have enough money saved to cover your expenses for at least six months to protect you and your family against unforeseen events that could impact your finances. Don’t let the timeline intimidate you, though. Get your rainy day fund up to one month’s worth of expenses and build from there.

Work with your significant other – not against them.

If you are planning to strengthen your financial foothold in 2015, make sure you have support from your significant other. If you and your significant other are on the same page, then you will have a better chance for success. For example, coming to an agreement on how much you each can spend on unnecessary expenses early on can save unnecessary drama in the future – and costs less than a divorce.

Review your company’s Section 125 plan.

If your employer offers a Cafeteria Plan to its employees, make sure you are aware of what benefit options are available to you and your family and that you taking full advantage of the pretax nature of these benefits. Benefits offered as part of your employer’s Section 125 plan could include health savings accounts, dependent care assistance, adoption assistance, group-term life insurance and others. If you are not sure what benefits are available to you or would like to make sure you are receiving the maximum benefit, set aside some time to speak with your company’s human resources department.

Know your credit score – then improve it.

An excellent credit score is one that is between 760 and 850. If you’re not sure what yours is, request your free copy and find out. Companies such as Experian, Transunion and Equifax will provide you with a free copy of your credit score. Once you know your score, work to increase your rating. This can be done any number of ways, but it takes time and hard work. And don’t be discouraged if you don’t see a massive increase over the next year. Even 20 points is considered a significant improvement.

Set up your will and power of attorney.

Don’t put off this critically important responsibility. If you haven’t already, make it a priority to establish your will and power of attorney as soon as possible. Or if you already have one in place, make sure it is not outdated. Set aside some time to review your current documents with your significant other and update it if needed.

Plan for the inevitable.

If something happens to you, will your family be able to carry on? Meet with your HR department to make sure you are taking full advantage of your life insurance options and disability plan.

Schedule a wellness visit for your mortgage.

When was the last time you reviewed your home mortgage? If it’s been awhile, you should review the interest rate and conditions of your loan. If you have been in your home for a while, you may be surprised to learn that there might be options out there that could save you money.

Organize, organize, organize.

Improving organization is one of the more popular resolutions to make. While you may be eying your closets, garage or basement, I suggest taking a look at your mailbox. Resolve to gather and organize your tax information as it is received. Doing so will ensure that you are not wasting time trying to find a piece of mail you misplaced a month ago and it will help you cut down on random clutter.

Review your retirement plan.

A new year means that you have another birthday on the horizon, which also means that you are another year closer to retirement. Schedule a time to meet with your financial advisor to determine if you should rebalance your portfolio to remain in line with your retirement goals.

Set up a 529 plan.

Are you saving for your children’s or grandchildren’s college education? Set up a 529 plan today and contribute to it early in the year to earn a return all year long. Earnings generated as a result of your contributions are not subject to federal or state taxes when used for qualified education expenses.

Find savings around the home.

If you take a hard look at your reoccurring monthly expenses, you may find that you don’t really need a lot of the services and utilities you are paying for. For example, does your home internet really need to be turbo-charged? Do you ever use the call forwarding or call waiting options on your home phone? Do you use your home phone at all? Are you paying for extra insurance to protect against a gas line leak? Depending on your circumstances, you could find significant savings by cutting back on some utilities you barely use.

Pass on the product warranties.

While it may seem like a good idea to pay a little extra for a warranty on that new appliance, a better option might be to put that money toward your rainy day fund instead. Sure, warranties are great for your peace of mind, but so is your rainy day fund. By opting out of the product warranty you will be able to put more money away while maintaining the freedom to spend it a way that makes more sense in the future.

Do you want this year to be filled with prosperity for you and your family? Email Rea & Associates to get more information on how you can succeed financially in 2015.

By Dave McCarthy, CPA, CSEP (Medina office)


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