Archive for the ‘Ohio’ Category

How Effective Is Your Nonprofit Organization?

Tuesday, June 10th, 2014

You’re busy. Your staff is busy. Everyone is busy. It’s easy to get bogged down in the day-to-day tasks and responsibilities of your organization. Meeting with prospective donors, educating groups on the mission of your organization, and managing volunteers. But let me ask you, when did you last spend time evaluating the effectiveness of your nonprofit organization? Has your donor base increased? Are you seeing an increase in volunteers and people who want to support your organization? Are you truly living out your organization’s mission and vision?

Evaluate Your Not-For-Profit’s Effectiveness

Can’t remember the last time you considered the effectiveness of your organization? Now is probably a good time. If after evaluating you discover that your organization has some areas for improvement, considering asking yourself the five questions below. Addressing these questions and areas may help you create a more effective nonprofit organization.

  1. Are we communicating our organization’s accomplishments?

    Many organizations make a lot of effort to communicate how much money they’ve raised, and how they use their funds. The focus seems to mostly be on the money and percentages. And while it’s important to communicate this information, don’t forget to talk about what your organization is actually doing. How are you carrying out the mission of your organization? What key accomplishments has your organization achieved? Place a greater emphasis on communicating your organization’s accomplishments.

  2. Is our organization’s board of directors actively engaged in the organization?

    When you conduct board meetings, do you sense that your board in engaged in the meeting? Are your board members asking questions and providing insight on how to strengthen the organization? Are they participating in and attending organization activities and fundraisers? If you can’t provide answers to these questions or the answer is “no,” then maybe you need to evaluate how you’re communicating and interacting with your board. A strong, engaged board can help drive the effectiveness of your organization.

  3. Is our organization’s mission and vision statements clearly defined and communicated to our audiences?

    If you were to survey your donor base, prospective donors, volunteers and others throughout the communities you serve, would you find that people understand your organization and its mission? Not sure what kind of responses you would get? One reason that your organization may not be as effective as it could be is because your audiences may not fully understand the mission and vision of your organization. Take a look at your mission and vision statements and see if you need to make some revisions.

  4. Do we clearly and timely communicate to our board of directors?

    This question really ties into whether or not you feel like you have an engaged board. One of the reasons you may not have an engaged board is because you’re not clearly and timely communicating with them. If there are important decisions that need to be made, make sure that you providing them with the necessary information to make the decision within a timely manner.

  5. How strong are our organization’s internal controls?

    Unfortunately, internal fraud is a real concern within nonprofit organizations. Few nonprofits have strong internal controls. As organizations grow, the internal controls need changing. Make sure the controls are operating at a level that will deter and detect fraud. Establish a code of conduct that will create a clear understanding of what is expected of all employees. Even if your organization only has a few employees, it is still possible to implement a system of checks and balances. These controls should help safeguard assets, produce accurate reports and improve administrative effectiveness. 

Ohio Non-For-Profit Help

Effective nonprofit organizations are impacting the communities they serve. If you are questioning the effectiveness of your organization, contact Rea & Associates. Our Ohio non-for-profit team can help you evaluate your organization and where you can increase your efficiency and effectiveness.

Author: Mark Van Benschoten, CPA (Dublin office)

 

Looking for more nonprofit organization tips and best practices? Check these blog posts out:

Which 990 Policies Do Non-Profits Need?

How Do You Build a Strong Not-for-Profit Board?

How Do You Protect Your Non-profit’s Donations from Fraud?

 

Share Button

Do Your Business Metrics Need an Oil Change?

Friday, May 23rd, 2014

Did you ever notice that little sticker in the upper left-hand corner of your windshield? The one that informs you your next service date for changing the oil and tire rotation. As you fire up the ignition, the fuel gauge is activated and the miles per gallon information is displayed. The on-board computer lets you know that the headlights are in the automatic position and the tires are properly inflated. The navigation system may even provide a weather update or a construction delay on the interstate. Within a matter of seconds of entering your vehicle, you have virtually all of the important metrics for your upcoming road trip.

Your business metrics and performance indicators should be as easy as locating your vehicle’s metrics. The metrics need to be meaningful to you and your team and used as a decision making tool in the day-to-day operations of the business. Many business owners and managers use daily and quarterly metrics more frequently than the monthly financial statements to run the day to day operations.

Business Metrics To Consider

Your business’s on-board computer can churn metric after metric and ratio after ratio. However, the quality of the metrics is far more important than the quantity. One recommendation is to identify four to six ratios that are unique to your business and industry and continue to study the trends on a daily or weekly basis. As a general rule, every business should consider metrics in the following areas:

  • Customer Metrics: How many new customers have you acquired over the last six months? How many customers have you lost? What is the average profit margin for each customer?
  • Cash Flow Metrics: These metrics should be designed to measure the company’s ability to meet obligations as they come due. For example: Is your inventory turning? How old are your accounts receivable?
  • Sales Metrics: A company should have sales metrics to measure sales and whether the sales are satisfactory for the company.
  • Employee Metrics: These metrics could be designed to measure how effectively the company is hiring and managing its employees.
  • Borrowing Metrics: This metric will measure how the company is effectively managing its debt. 

Once the metrics have been determined than a “windshield sticker” or dashboard can be affixed to your technology devices and reviewed by the management team on a regular basis. In addition, an industry scorecard can be developed to measure how the business compares to the industry.

Just like the oil in a car, the business metrics will need to be changed or enhanced on a regular basis to reflect changes in the economy and the business cycle.

Safe travels and be on the look-out for orange construction barrels and detours. Check your metrics!

Business Metrics Help

If you need help determine which business metrics are right for your business, contact Rea & Associates. Our team of Ohio business consultants can help you determine which business metrics are needed for the success and growth of your business.

Author: Dave Cain, CPA (Dublin office)

 

 Related Articles

How Can A Small Business Owner Keep More Money In Their Pocket?

How Can Analytics Help Reduce Fraud Risk At Your Business?

What Are 6 Things You Can Do To Improve The Health Of Your Business in 2014?

 

Share Button

What Should You Do After Tax Season?

Monday, April 14th, 2014

Now that most of you have either filed your 2013 tax return or at least gathered your tax information and sent it off to your CPA, I know what you’re thinking. Phew! I’m done with my taxes for yet another year! But guess what? No, you aren’t!

Now is the time to start planning for next year. The sooner you plan ahead and strategize for next year’s tax season, the better off you may be. Not happy with the amount of taxes that you had to pay this past year? Not happy that you seem to work harder and harder only to pay more in taxes and get further behind? Start planning now for future tax seasons!

Tax Planning For the Future

Here are a few things you can start working on now to help create a better tax experience for yourself next year:

  • Develop an investment strategy. Most people don’t understand the affect this can have on your tax return. You can control when and how to take gains from your investments. You should work on developing a long-term investment strategy with your investment advisor.
  • Create a plan to sell property. Are you considering selling property sometime in the future? Did you know that there are ways to minimize taxes that need to be paid on the sale of property? This isn’t done by calling your financial advisor and letting them know you just sold some property. Get them involved now and discuss that you plan to sell some property in three to five years. Your financial advisor can help you structure the property sale and ultimately help you control the tax effect.
  • Establish a business plan. If you’re thinking about starting a new business, work with your financial advisor now to determine what tax savings you may be able to realize. Depending on the type of entity there could be significant tax savings down the road. 

Tax Planning Help

While there’s no single quick fix to solving all of your business and tax woes, planning now will certainly help you when tax season rolls around next year – and the year after that and so on. If you need help with your tax planning, contact Rea & Associates. Our team of Ohio tax planning professionals can help you develop a tax strategy that best suits you for years to come.

Author: Dave McCarthy, CPA, CSEP (Medina office)

 

Want to read some more articles related to tax planning? Check these posts out?

What Is The Difference Between Fixed Asset Expensing And Capitalization?

So Is It a Tax Credit Or a Tax Deduction?

How Will A Tax Credits and Incentives Plan Benefit Your Business?

Share Button

What Is The Petroleum Activities Tax and How Does It Affect My Business?

Monday, March 10th, 2014

Remember the CAT—the Commercial Activity Tax? Well, there’s another acronym you’ll need to get familiar with – the PAT, the Petroleum Activities Tax. Starting July 1, any receipts from the sale of motor fuel will be excluded from Commercial Activity Tax (CAT) receipts. That means if you’re a supplier of motor fuel, you’ll have to pay the replacement Petroleum Activities Tax (PAT), measured by your gross receipts for first sales of motor fuel outside of the distribution system in Ohio.  (more…)

Share Button

How Do I Apply For Ohio’s Honor Project Trust?

Wednesday, February 19th, 2014

Could your nonprofit use some “extra cash”? I’m sure most of you answered “yes” to that question. And the timing couldn’t be better. A few months back I wrote a blog post about Ohio’s Honor Project Trust. The Honor Project Trust was created as a result of a lawsuit settlement. Excess settlement proceeds from the lawsuit totaling approximately $9 million were earmarked for Ohio nonprofits. The trust’s mission is to identify and providing funding to not-for-profit charitable organizations that have a societal impact in the State of Ohio.  (more…)

Share Button