Archive for the ‘Estate Planning’ Category

Did Prince Forfeit Control Over His Multimillion Dollar Estate?

Wednesday, April 27th, 2016

Learn How A Will Protects Your Fortune After Death

Did Prince Have A Will | Why A Will Matters | Ohio CPA Firm

PHOTO CREDIT: www.Billboard.com
According to Prince’s sister, Tyka Nelson, the music legend neglected to draw up a will before he died. Regardless of how large (or how small) your fortune is, estate planning is essential and drawing up a will is a critical component of the plan – one you literally can’t afford to ignore. Keep reading to find out why a will is one of the most important documents you will ever have drawn up.

While driving my sons to school this morning, we heard on the radio that, according to his sister, Tyka Nelson, music legend Prince died without having a will in place. This means, if the reports are true, Prince’s estate will be managed by a Minnesota probate court and will likely come with a large tax bill.

Naturally, this story has already generated national attention concerning the future of Prince’s multimillion dollar estate. What is certain, however, is that if Prince did die without having a will, his sister and five other half-siblings would stand to acquire a significant inheritance – after taxes, of course.

Read Also: You Can Still Have The Final Say After Death

Who Will Inherit Your Fortune?

I know that my sons truly love each other but, like most siblings, they fight like cats and dogs. So I decided to use the drive to school as a teachable moment.

Because both of my sons dream of becoming professional sports stars (let them dream), I advised them to heed the warning tucked within the morning’s news report. If you don’t want your brother to inherit your fortune when you pass away, you need to have a will in place that will determine where your millions go. Otherwise, the state will give everything to your next of kin.

Still Not Sure If A Will Is Necessary?

Regardless of how large (or how small) your fortune is, estate planning is essential and drawing up a will is a critical component of the plan – one you literally can’t afford to ignore. Among the many benefits of establishing a will, this document will:

  • Give you the final say over how your finances will be distributed.
  • Establish who will be legally responsible for caring for your minor children.
  • Help you avoid a drawn-out probate process.
  • Provide you with an opportunity to minimize your tax burden.
  • Let you determine who will be responsible for managing the affairs of your estate.

Lesson Learned?

You don’t have to be a teacher to pass along a few solid words of wisdom to your children. You just need seize teachable moments when they present themselves – even if all you can do is begin laying the groundwork for an even bigger lesson. Here’s what we accomplished on this morning’s drive:

  • I’m certain my boys now agree on one thing – that when they become professional sports stars (or whatever profession they choose), a will is a must have.
  • They now know who Prince is and that he acquired a lot of money over the course of his career.
  • Hopefully, they now have a basic understanding of the importance of a will. (I’m probably going to have to have a follow-up conversation about this one.)

Eh, I tried.

Would you like to learn more about estate planning and how to ensure your assets are distributed in accordance with your wishes after you die? Listen to episode 6 of unsuitable on Rea Radio with Dave McCarthy – The Grim Reaper Is Coming And He Wants Your Money. You can also email Rea & Associates to learn more.

By Inez Bowie, CPA, CSEP (Marietta office)

The following articles offer some more great advice about the importance of drawing up a will.

How Do You Value Property For An Estate In Ohio?

Why Should Your Digital Assets Be Part Of Your Estate Plan?

What Tax Liabilities Accompany Inherited Real Estate?

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Business Leaders Were Reading What?!

Monday, December 28th, 2015

2015’s Most Popular Blog Posts

Best Business Blog Posts 2015- Ohio CPA FirmIf you take a moment to scroll through the list of categories, authors and archives on the right-hand side of this page, it’s pretty clear to see just how active Rea’s team of experts are when it comes to providing leaders in the business community with accurate, timely and easy to digest content. We are fortunate to have so much experience and expertise on our staff, and their eagerness to serve you better has allowed us to maintain a bi-weekly electronic newsletter, a quarterly print newsletter, three blogs and a handful of electronic segment specific newsletters. That’s a lot of content – but we are not even thinking about slowing down! I hope you hang around my lily pad for awhile. I’m pretty sure you’ll find a lot of great little tidbits to read about in 2016 too. Until then, I want to invite you to take a look at some of our most popular blog posts and articles. And, if you haven’t already, take a moment to look through the newsletters we offer and sign up to have news, tips and valuable information delivered to your inbox all year long!

Top 5 Dear Drebit Posts In 2015

Dear Drebit is updated every few days with timely information and advice. In addition to covering current trends and issues, readers are also invited to ask financial and business questions on the page, which will be answered by one of Rea’s industry experts. Here are last year’s top posts:

  1. How Far Back Can The IRS Go For Auditing?
  2. Theft Safeguards To Cause Tax Return Delays In Ohio
  3. Six Things 401K Plan Sponsors Need To Do Now
  4. New Adjustments Will Affect Your 2015 Tax Return
  5. File Faster With This Tax Prep Checklist

5 Most Popular Posts On Brushing Up Blog

Brushing Up: The Dental Accounting Blog features a variety of finance and business advice specifically tailored to dental professionals. From purchasing a practice, knowing what to expect from a career in dentistry and hiring the best staff for your practice to general accounting advice, tips for cashing out at retirement and tax tips, this blog is a valuable tool for dental professionals who are looking for ways to secure long-term success in their career. The year’s most-read blog posts are:

  1. How Sales & Use Taxes Apply To Ohio Dental Practices
  2. 6 QuickBooks Tips Every Dentist Should Know
  3. Could A Crown Be A Tax Deduction?
  4. 10 Year-End Tax Planning Strategies For Dentists
  5. Buying An Established Dental Practice? Master The Changeover 

Cultivating Your Business Readers Choose Top 5 2015 Posts

The Cultivating Your Business blog is a resource provided to clients and visitors on the firm’s Know & Grow website. Updated a few times per month, business owners have access to advice, tips and general insight into how to grow their businesses and realize an optimal return on their investment upon retirement. Here are the top blog posts from last year:

  1. Bad Buy-Sell Agreement Claims Another Family Dinner
  2. Will Your Summer Reading List Make You A Better Business Owner?
  3. WARNING: Free Business Valuation Offer Is Unbelievable
  4. Uncover The Secrets To Cashing In On Your Business
  5. How To Communicate To Your Employees That You’re Selling Your Business

Top 10 Articles In Rea’s Library In 2015

In addition to our blogs, the Rea team publishes a lot of other valuable content in print and electronic newsletters. We make sure that all these articles are easily accessible in our article library. This is where you will find many of our niche pieces as well as a lot of general accounting tips and insights. Take a look at some of our most popular posts over the last year.

  1. What Is The Mid-Quarter Convention?
  2. Dangers Of Paying Under The Table
  3. Revenue Recognition Changes Are Coming
  4. Football Ticket Deductions
  5. 401K Loans And Keeping Your Plan In Compliance
  6. Take Control Of Your Vendor Master In Nine Steps
  7. Why Your Traditional Employee Management Method Is Failing
  8. The Birth Of The Taxpayer’s Estate
  9. Parting Is Such Sweet Sorrow: But What About Your 401K?
  10. Purchasing Cards Compromise Business Security
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Congress Gives Taxpayers An Early Christmas Present

Monday, December 21st, 2015

PATH Act Makes Several Key Tax Provisions Permanent

PATH Act Makes Several Key Tax Provisions Permanent | Rea & Associates | Ohio CPA Firm

Congress finally made good on its promise to make take a more definitive stance on the future of many popular tax provisions last week when members voted in favor of making many of them permanent. Other tax provisions received a temporary extension. Read on to learn more.

There is nothing like waiting until the last minute to complete a task. We’ve all been there and we all promise we’ll never do it again. Unfortunately (especially when it comes to determining the future of several valuable tax provisions) our government has fallen victim to the same bad habit.

Year after year, Congress promises to address the future of many expired tax provisions, and year after year they fail to make a definitive decision – opting only to pass legislation that extends the provisions for another year. In the meantime, taxpayers are expected to take on the impossible task of navigating the terrain amidst legislative uncertainty. Happily, things are about to change.

Listen To Our Podcast Taxes Are Like Fishing To Learn More About Tax Strategy

Congress finally made good on its promise to make take a more definitive stance on the future of many popular tax provisions last week when members voted in favor of making many of them permanent. Other tax provisions received a temporary extension. The legislation, Protecting Americans From Tax Hikes Act of 2015 (PATH Act), is retroactive to Jan. 1, 2015, and provides taxpayers a level of certainty that they have been without for quite some time.

This legislation offers a lot of relief to individuals and businesses, alike. Here’s an overview of what you can expect moving forward.

Key Tax Provisions Made Permanent By The PATH Act:

  • 15-year recovery period for qualified leasehold improvements, qualified restaurant buildings and improvements, and qualified retail improvements
  • Extension and modification of the research & development credit, including allowing certain small businesses to claim the credit against AMT liability and employer’s payroll (ie: FICA) liability
  • 179 expensing limitations and phase out increased to $500,000 and $2 million respectively
  • Exclusion of 100 percent of gain on certain small business stock
  • Extension of tax-free distributions from IRAs for charitable purposes
  • Earned income tax credit
  • Child tax credit

Key Provisions Extended Through 2019

  • Extension of the new markets tax credit in which Congress authorized $3.5 billion allocation of credits each year from 2015 until 2019
  • Extension and expansion of the work opportunity tax credit
  • Bonus depreciation is extended at 50 percent for 2015 through 2017, 40 percent for 2018, and 30 percent for 2019

Key Provisions Extended Through 2016

  • Extension and expansion of empowerment zone tax incentives
  • Two-year moratorium on the 2.3 percent medical excise tax imposed on the sale of medical devices
  • Extension of energy efficient commercial buildings deduction

In addition to the extension of key tax provisions, the PATH act also puts more scrutiny on the operations of the IRS. IRS agents will be held accountable for knowing and acting in accordance with the taxpayer bill of rights and prohibits the use of IRS business for political gain.

The passage of the PATH act is a huge victory for American taxpayers, and will allow them to partner more efficiently and effectively with their tax advisors on key issues in years to come without the uncertainty that has plagued them for many years.

Be sure to set up an appointment to speak with your tax advisor or financial planner to talk about how the PATH act will impact your ability to take advantage of tax planning strategies. Do you have questions about specific aspects of the PATH act? Fill out the form on the top, right side of this page to submit your question to Dear Drebit.

By Ashley Matthews (Dublin office)

Are you looking for more ways to save on your tax bill? These articles can help:

Year-End Tax Tips For Business Owners

Dos & Don’ts of Gifting Donations

Should I Make A Big Purchase To Cut Taxes?

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You Can Still Have The Final Say After Death

Friday, October 23rd, 2015
Estate Planning - Ohio CPA Firm

It doesn’t matter if you have a lot of assets to pass on or very few, estate planning is one of the best things you can do for yourself and for those you love.

Life is full of enjoyable experiences. Spending time with family and friends, hiking through the woods, spending the afternoon on the lake, immersing yourself in a hobby – these are the moments we live for. What if you could give yourself the opportunity to make those moments more enjoyable? Would you take that opportunity?

Click To Listen To Episode 6 of Unsuitable on Rea Radio: The Grim Reaper Is Coming … And He Wants Your Money

Every time you avoid the conversation about estate planning you miss out on a chance to make this period of your life even more enjoyable – for you, and for your loved ones. Once you have made your plans with regard to what you want to happen after your death, those thoughts are no longer in the back of your mind. They are decided and you can truly enjoy the moment with your friends and family.

Three Things Everybody Should Know About Estate Planning

  1. Estate planning is for everybody. Estate planning isn’t just dependent on your assets; it’s about identifying what you want to happen after you pass away. Who do you want to take care of your children, for example, and do you want that person to be financially responsible for them as well – they don’t necessarily have to be the same people. When you take control of your estate planning, you are effectively helping to ease the burden that is already felt by your loved ones. Not only will you have already made the difficult decisions, but you can do so in a way that provides additional benefits for your heirs while securing your legacy.
  2. If you have an IRA, don’t forget to name your contingent beneficiary.  It’s common to have an IRA through your employer, but oftentimes naming the IRA’s contingent beneficiary is forgotten. Usually it’s your spouse, but if your spouse has already passed away, you need to make sure to name a new contingent beneficiary. This is just one simple way to plan ahead, but it’s frequently overlooked.
  3. Probate Court isn’t always a bad thing. You hear people say things like: “You want to avoid probate at all costs.” But that’s not necessarily the case. For example, imagine that you’ve made plans to have all your assets go directly to your three children – avoiding the probate process altogether. When it comes time to pay for your funeral, you would hope that your three children would split the cost three ways without much ado. But, without Probate Court to mediate the situation, one child could decide that they don’t want to pay their portion, which would leave the other two children with the bill. When you bring probate into the equation, you help ensure that there is enough money available to cover these necessary funeral expenses.

Find Time To Enjoy More

It doesn’t matter if you have a lot of assets to pass on or very few, estate planning is one of the best things you can do for yourself and for those you love. The sooner you start planning yours, the sooner you can get back to enjoying the moments that truly make life worth living.

By Dave McCarthy, CPA, CSEP (Medina office)

Dave McCarthy Discusses Estate Planning during Unsuitable on Rea RadioLearn more about the importance of estate planning. Listen to “The Grim Reaper Is Coming … And He Wants Your Money” podcast on Unsuitable on Rea Radio at www.reacpa.com/podcast or on iTunes or SoundCloud.

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Stop The Family Drama With A Buy-Sell Agreement

Thursday, October 8th, 2015
Take control of your future with a buy-sell agreement - Unsuitable on Rea Radio

You don’t know what the future holds, but if you don’t take steps to prepare for the unknown you are leaving your business and your family vulnerable. Click here to listen to How To Ruin Thanksgiving Dinner on Unsuitable on Rea Radio, a new finance and business management podcast.

It seems like when the holiday season comes around everybody does their best to put their best foot forward and to portray the image of “the flawless family.” From the turkey dinner on Thanksgiving, to the Christmas cards featuring happy, loving families – we do all we can just to make sure everything is … perfect.

Listen to the podcast: How To Ruin Thanksgiving Dinner

The holiday season is also notorious for other less-than-perfect qualities, such as family fights, holiday shopping stress and, ultimately, increased depression and anxiety.

Now imagine you are battling the normal holiday stressors while trying to manage a family business. And what if your business is in crisis mode and your life, the future of your family members and the sustainability of your company hangs in the balance?

When you own a business with family or friends you already run the risk of business matters spilling over into your personal affairs. But when you haven’t invested the time and resources needed to plan ahead, you are leaving your business and your family vulnerable. Take control of the future of your business and the general well-being of your family all year long by knowing the true value of your business and investing in a proper buy-sell agreement.

Click here to read the full article.

By Tim McDaniel, CPA/ABV, ASA, CBA (Dublin office)

Business Valuations - Ohio CPA firmLearn more about the importance of securing a custom business valuation and buy-sell agreement. Listen to the How To Ruin Thanksgiving Dinner” podcast on Unsuitable on Rea Radio at www.reacpa.com/podcast or on iTunes or SoundCloud.

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Why would I want to listen to a podcast from an accounting firm?

Wednesday, October 7th, 2015
Unsuitable Podcast - Ohio CPA Firm

Mark Van Benschoten (left) talks with Doug Feller, a principal and financial advisor with Investment Partners, talks about wealth enhancement and investment tactics for an upcoming episode of Unsuitable on Rea Radio, a new financial and business advisory podcast from Rea & Associates. Click here to learn more about Unsuitable on Rea Radio.

I know what you’re thinking – listening to a podcast from an accounting firm is probably about as entertaining and insightful as watching paint dry. But Unsuitable on Rea Radio isn’t your typical accounting podcast, and here’s why.

Real, Simple Solutions

Who doesn’t like a good story? What about one that leaves you with greater insight into the financial wellness of your own company? And if you had a better idea of how other successful entrepreneurs manage their wealth, wouldn’t you try to follow their lead?

The professionals at Rea have seen a lot over the last several decades and they are willing to open the curtain just enough to provide you with the information to forge your own success. And on Unsuitable, they do just that.

An Effective Kick In The Pants

Unsuitable offers a little something for everybody and I am confident that this is a show that will not only help provide you with more clarity, but will motivate you to take the next step as a professional and as a business leader.

Look at what has already been discussed in the first four episodes:

And this is just the beginning. Look for episodes highlighting investment strategies, Affordable Care Act compliance and retirement preparedness – just to name a few.

Accountants Like To Laugh Too

This may come as a surprise to many since those in the accounting profession tend to be thought of as dry, stuffy, number-crunching fanatics, but that’s just not true – well, most of the time. The Rea team consists of some pretty humorous, outgoing folks and I think that the diverse sense of humor of our team shines through. Mark Van Benschoten, the host of the show, helps a lot, of course. He does an excellent job addressing each guest and makes them feel comfortable … then the show gets really good.

Just The Right Length

Our firm has 11 offices throughout Ohio, which means I do a lot of driving. When I’m on the road I like to listen to podcasts – and there are a lot of them out there! What I really like about Unsuitable, is that it’s long enough to be really informative and wraps up nicely before it reaches the point where I am wishing it would end. In fact, when it does end I find myself wanting to start the next one. Mark and his guests get right to the point of the show, provide examples and offer hard-hitting advice in a concise, enjoyable format – all while having a great time and avoiding stuffy accounting jargon.

Go to www.reacpa.com/podcast now and start listening or subscribe to Unsuitable on Rea Radio on iTunes or SoundCloud. I also want to encourage you to use #ReaRadio to join the conversation on Twitter and Facebook.

By Lee Beall, CPA (Dublin office)

Click here and start listening to Unsuitable on Rea Radio now!

 

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Six Things You Can Do Now To Protect Your Loved Ones’ Assets

Tuesday, April 14th, 2015
Making Moments Count: Family Financial Challenges

Bright Idea: Make sure everyone in your family has their financial information organized in one place. The organizer you’ll find in the financial resources section of our website is a great place to start. Click here to view our Personal Financial Records Document and get started today.

The value of our existence is measured by an infinite collection of meaningful moments that have shaped our lives and the lives of those around us. Perhaps our most precious moments occur when we positively impact the lives of our loved ones. We are all capable of initiating these moments and, sometimes, a simple conversation is all that is needed to provide insurmountable relief – now and for years to come.

Find out what else you can do now to improve your personal and financial well-being.

Even if they have never expressed their concern about the realities of aging before, it is almost certain that your parents are worried about their own mortality. Because this topic doesn’t typically find its way into casual conversation, it is your responsibility to broach the subject. Your parents will be grateful you did.

Here are five things you can do now to actively protect your loved one’s assets:

1. Overcome Your Discomfort

The first conversation about your loved ones’ finances is probably the most uncomfortable one, but it’s also the most important. It’s uncomfortable to talk to our parents about their death. Mom and Dad don’t find it thrilling either because they don’t want to be a burden. But as awkward as it is to discuss, you may eventually be shouldered with responsibility of managing the affairs your parents leave behind.

2. Set Up A Power Of Attorney

In order for you to assume this important role, you must be named as your parents’ power of attorney. This step gives you legal authority to pay their bills, maintain their residence, complete tax returns and review their financial investments.

If your power of attorney was established more than two years ago, verify that it was issued properly by today’s standards. Even though powers of attorney never expire, some have reported having problems with establishments that have updated their forms. The new forms no longer identify powers of attorney that were named several years ago.

Your parents can name multiple powers of attorney. But to avoid possible disputes, make sure that you and your siblings have your own, clearly defined responsibilities. Also, if your parents have decided to name a power of attorney, and it’s not you, make a point to respect their decision – even if you don’t agree with it. As long as a plan is in place, you and your family are on the right track.

3. Understand Your Responsibilities

Being a power of attorney is a big responsibility. Not only are you empowered to make tough decisions, your actions are now able to be scrutinized by everybody from the IRS to other family members. To avoid problems, carefully track how much money is coming in and going out and maintain thorough records. And call in the professionals if you feel like you’re in over your head.

4. Send In The Team

In the past, did your parents work with a team of professionals to manage their finances, legal affairs or anything else? If so, make it a priority to talk to them before moving any money or assets around. You will need to know if your parents set up a will, trusts, or anything else over the course of their lives. This team will not only be able to compile the information you need, they can answer your technical questions, which will make the entire process go smoother.

5. Compile An Inventory

To manage anything well you must have a clear picture of what it is you are managing. To that end, make it a point to compile a complete inventory of your parent’s assets and liabilities to create a clearer plan of action.

Do you know how the value of real property is determined?
Read: How Do You Value Property For An Estate In Ohio to learn more.

6. Simplify, Simplify, Simplify

Once you understand your responsibilities, simplify everything. For example, if your parents have seven or eight open bank accounts throughout the county or state, consolidate them into one – and don’t stop there. From assets to investments, consolidating these affairs will make your job easier and less confusing as you try to track expenses.

It’s not easy to manage your loved ones finances, but with the right approach, plan and team of advisors, you can do it – and do it well. Once you get your ducks in a row, you can focus on other, more important things – like making every moment with your loved ones count.

By: David K. McCarthy, CPA, CSEP (Medina office)

This article was originally published in The Rea Report, a Rea & Associates print publication, Winter 2015. If you don’t already receive The Rea Report, our quarterly print newsletter, in your mailbox, click here and start your subscription today!

 

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Why Should Digital Assets Be Part Of Your Estate Plan?

Manage Your Business’s Ethical Framework After You’re Gone

When Should You Start Thinking About Succession Planning?

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What Tax Liabilities Accompany Inherited Real Estate?

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

So you just inherited some real estate. You’re probably now wondering – is this a blessing or a curse? From the tax perspective, of course. And that’s a good question to ask. Just because you inherit something doesn’t mean that you’re free and clear of any potential tax liabilities. Depending on how you use the property and if you sell it will determine if you have a taxable situation. So here’s what you should know about taxes and inherited real estate.  (more…)

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Why Should Your Digital Assets Be Part of Your Estate Plan?

Thursday, November 21st, 2013

Just when you think your estate plan is complete, is it really? Your will gives your personal property to your daughter, Suzie. Great, Suzie gets your laptop and your smartphone. But what happens to your online accounts, emails, Facebook account, iTunes account, that special digital crown won in an online game, and digital pictures stored in the “cloud”? Does Suzie know where to find your usernames or passwords? Even if she does, does she have a right to access the accounts?  (more…)

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Have You Reviewed Your Life Insurance Lately?

Monday, February 4th, 2013

You’re used to discussing your financial assets with your CPA. You talk to your accountant about your income, your business and your estate plan. But there’s one financial asset that doesn’t always come up in discussions of your financial situation: your life insurance policy. Insurance might seem more like a safeguard than an asset, but it’s an important part of your financial portfolio. And, it’s important to review it regularly with the same diligence that you devote to your income, your business and your estate.

Why review your life insurance? Three reasons: to save money, reduce risk and ensure policy suitability. (more…)

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Does Ohio Have an Estate Tax?

Friday, December 21st, 2012

Recently, Ohio eliminated the Ohio estate tax.  The estates of individuals who die after January 1, 2013 will not be subject to the Ohio estate tax. (more…)

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How Do You Prepare for Uncertain 2013 Tax Rates?

Wednesday, November 7th, 2012

As we approach the end of 2012, there is much uncertainty regarding tax legislation. Tax rates, exemptions, credits and deductions are likely to change for both businesses and individuals, but no one yet knows which of the predicted changes will really come to pass. How do you prepare for this uncertain future? Take advantage of the 2012 rates while you still can and plan for contingencies in 2013 and beyond. (more…)

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How Do You Value Property for an Estate in Ohio?

Wednesday, September 5th, 2012

Recently, a reader shared with us that she inherited property in both Ohio and Florida. She had a pretty specific question related to the value of the Ohio property. That question made me think there may be more people who don’t know how to handle newly inherited property for estate tax purposes. Hence, I’m going to provide some general estate information I hope will help.

According to Ohio law, “the value of any property included in the gross estate shall be the price at which such property would change hands between a willing buyer and a willing seller, neither being under any compulsion to buy or sell and both having reasonable knowledge of relevant facts.”

Now, let me put that in simpler terms. If there is real estate in an estate, then you need to claim its fair value. That value is the amount the property would sell for assuming both the buyer and seller know about the property and neither was pressured to either buy or sell. (more…)

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If Something Happens to You, What Will Happen to Your Finances?

Friday, February 24th, 2012

One day, I received a call from a client whose husband had been hospitalized for a couple of weeks.  He had mentioned that he thought a tax payment was due that day.  She did not know how to make that payment, or if it needed to be paid.  We worked things through, but learned a valuable lesson: she realized she doesn’t know much about the family finances. (more…)

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Thinking of Gifting Money to Relatives? Late 2011 and Early 2012 May Be Best Timing

Wednesday, December 28th, 2011

If you’ve been considering making a monetary gift to your children or other relatives, you may want to make your gift well before December 31. And better yet, if you haven’t made any previous gifts in 2011, you can gift up to $13,000 in 2011 and follow up with a gift of up to $13,000 in early 2012. (more…)

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How will selling a house from an estate impact my taxes?

Thursday, January 20th, 2011

Dear Drebit:

My mother passed away October 30, 2009. She left my brother and me her house, which has just been released from probate court. We have someone wanting to buy it and we would split around $140,000. What kind of taxes do we face? The house is in SC. I would appreciate your help. (more…)

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How does the new estate tax work?

Wednesday, December 22nd, 2010

Congress has finally gotten around to fixing the federal estate and gift tax, even if they are a full year late and have made only temporary rules for the next two years.  The Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization and Job Creation Act of 2010 revives the estate tax for 2010 and makes a number of other changes for 2011 and 2012. (more…)

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Isn’t Extending the Bush Tax Cuts A Temporary Fix?

Friday, December 17th, 2010

While some may be breathing a sigh of relief now that the brokered tax package has passed through Congress and is being signed by President Obama, others among us are becoming increasingly alarmed at the “temporary” nature of our tax laws – and the impact these temporary fixes will have on our long-term planning. (more…)

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