Archive for the ‘Business Valuation’ Category

Do You Know The Best Way To Buy A Business?

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016
Business Acquistions - Ohio CPA Firm

Ryan Dumermuth, principal at Rea & Associates, and Kirk Spillman, president and CEO of Eagle Machinery in Sugarcreek, Ohio, join Mark Van Benschoten on episode 34 of unsuitable on Rea Radio.

Generally speaking, relationships are easier to develop and maintain when you work with the other person. The same is true in business, especially when you’re considering the relationship between a business owner and an advisor. I had a chance to be a guest on an episode of unsuitable on Rea Radio with Kirk Spillman, president and CEO of Eagle Machinery, a manufacturing company located in Sugarcreek, Ohio, to talk about what goes into developing a strong business advisory relationship – particularly when buying a business. Bottom line, a successful relationship with your advisor goes far beyond any monetary transaction; it’s rooted in mutual trust and respect. And, if nurtured, a relationship with your advisor can last a lifetime and can help drive long-term business success.


Listen to episode 34: the best way to buy a business, build a relationship that matters, on unsuitable on Rea Radio, Rea & Associates’ financial services and business advisory podcast.


How Well Do They Know Business & Can You Trust Them?

Before you decide who you should work with from an advisory perspective, you need to consider what kind of assistance you’re looking for. Remember that while it’s not always necessary for your advisor to have expertise specific to your industry (although that is undoubtedly helpful), it is critical for your advisor to be a business expert who can effortlessly apply general business tactics, strategies and best practices to address your specific needs and drive results. Don’t miss out on an opportunity to work with the best advisor in the market simply because they don’t market themselves as an expert in construction or healthcare. Call them up and get to know them before making a decision. Your choice should ultimately hinge on the advisor’s business prowess and out-of-the-box thinking.

When You Don’t Know, Ask An Advisor

We hear a lot about the importance of bringing an advisor on to assist with succession, but there are important considerations an advisor should be privy to when buying a business as well. Over the course of my career, I’ve learned that a person looking to buy a business needs just as much help, if not more, than the tenured business owner seeking to embark on retirement.

Those who are new to business ownership are trying to overcome a variety of obstacles, not to mention the difficulty associated with managing a smaller budget. And while it may not seem to make much sense to “splurge” on advice from a professional business consultant when there are other bills to be paid, the best way to navigate this unknown territory is to turn to a trusted advisor who has seen the situation you are facing.

“I learned very quickly how much I did not know about business,” said Kirk, during the podcast. “I thought I knew enough about operations and customer service and marketing all of those things that I could just step into this business and be very successful. [Before long] I recognized that there were going to be things that I would need that I didn’t have experience or resources for … [like] the entity itself. How do we set this entity up? I knew nothing about that.”

Your business advisor will be able to shine light on the areas you know nothing about, such as how to structure your business entity, how to determine the true value of the business, setting up payroll, managing inventory, etc. There’s a lot of risk involved in buying a business because, particularly for owners who are new to entrepreneurship, there are so many unknowns. Your team of advisors will help take the guess work out of business ownership.

I invite you to learn a little bit more about Kirk’s experience and to learn how a business advisor can help you establish, manage and grow your business until you decide it’s time for you to move on. Click on the media player below or visit www.reacpa.com/podcast to learn more about the best way to buy a business.

By Ryan Dumermuth, CPA, CFP (Mentor office)

Want to learn more tips to help you succeed in business, check out the following articles for additional insight.

Dream Big: Considerations For The Aspiring Business Owner

So You Want To Buy A Business: Now What

Getting By With A Little Help From Your Friends

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Is An Office Relocation In Your Company’s Future?

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2016
Office Relocation - Ohio CPA Firm

A common mistake some business owners make is to believe they can coordinate the office relocation themselves. And while it may be possible to manage your daily responsibilities, make decisions about the future of your business and property real estate negotiations, you may wind up doing more harm than good because you aren’t giving any of your responsibilities the proper attention needed to succeed. Read on to find out how your business advisory team can help.

There are many reasons why you may want to move your business to a new location, but if you want to be sure the location you choose is not only equipped to meet your needs, that the price is reasonable and that the location is ideal, consider bringing in your business advisory team for guidance.

When it comes to determining your business’s overall financial wellness, look no further than your financial advisor. These professionals are experts when it comes to helping you determine an accurate cash flow projection, make sense of any tax implications associated with the move and will help you determine if, based on your current size and projected growth, that space you are eyeing makes since. But your financial advisor can really only help you see a part of the picture. I recommend bringing adding a real estate expert to your business advisory team when major relocation decisions are the topic of conversation.

Read Also: Is A Sale-Leaseback Transaction Right For Your Business?

A common mistake some business owners make is to believe they can coordinate the office relocation themselves. And while it may be possible to manage your daily responsibilities, make decisions about the future of your business and property real estate negotiations, you may wind up doing more harm than good because you aren’t giving any of your responsibilities the proper attention needed to succeed. A real estate broker will not only manage the legwork associated with choosing your business’s new location, they will make sure you get exactly what you are paying for while negotiating a deal that builds out time for you to establish yourself at your new address.

I recently spoke with Justin Fodor, a real estate broker with Carr Healthcare Realty, a brokerage firm that works exclusively with professionals in the healthcare industry, about other reasons why a business owner – regardless of industry – should consider working with a real estate expert.

Get Your Money’s Worth

When it comes to understanding the art of negotiation, a real estate broker has the knowledge and experience needed to help you lock in a great deal at favorable terms – regardless of whether you are planning to buy or rent your new property. Oftentimes during this process, the business owner may be a apprehensive about being too forceful during the negotiation process. Justin says this is a great scenario of when a real estate broker would come in handy because they have the knowledge needed to go into the meeting with the confidence of knowing that the “sticker price” is only the starting price.

And if you are worried about sending in a broker to negotiate on your behalf, don’t be.

“Landlords work with brokers all the time,” explained Justin. “In fact, they hire their own brokers. They expect you to bring one to the table as well.”

Location, Location, Location

According to Justin, if a real estate brokerage firm doesn’t specialize in demographics itself, they will work with professionals who do to make sure their clients are getting the ideal location for their business. Whether you want to find out how many similar businesses are in a certain area or whether the local business climate is right for your business to be successful, demographic information helps optimize your office’s geography.

“We can help [our clients] decide the type of environment that’s right for them by taking into consideration foot traffic, visibility, population, and other demographics,” said Justin.

Take The Time You Need

Perhaps one of the best reasons to work with a real estate broker – especially one who specializes in your specific industry, is because they know how to negotiate for terms that matter most to you.

Justin explained that when he works with dental professionals, for example, he always asks for the time needed to move into the space, install equipment, remodel the office and reestablish their client business.

A broker, especially if they specialize in serving businesses like yours, can help you negotiate the time you need to stabilize your business’s cash flow. In fact, Justin said it’s not uncommon to secure a 5-month build-out period and 3-4 months of rent-free office space, which gives you enough time to get your business up and running again.

Are you  considering an office relocation or a major warehouse move, email Rea & Associates to learn more about establishing a strong business advisory team.

By Ryan Dumermuth, CPA, CFP (Mentor office)

Are you looking for more ways to facilitate business growth? These articles should help:

How To Ensure Your Plans Aren’t Bigger Than Your Finances In Times Of Growth

Protect Your Business With These 6 Tips

It’s OK To ‘Think Small’ – Revenue Growth Isn’t Always The Solution

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Protect Your Business With These 6 Tips

Wednesday, February 10th, 2016
Protect Your Business - Ohio CPA Firm

Do you know that most of your net worth is tied up in your business. That means, if you don’t adequately protect it, you could stand to lose nearly everything you’ve spent your life working for. Read on for some great tips to help you protect your business.

It’s human nature to do everything we can to protect the people we love and the property we value. From drawing up legal documents to purchasing the newest safety products on the market – we are always looking for ways to protect what’s ours. Hopefully, this same mindset governs your business’s risk-management strategy as well.

Do you know that most of your net worth is tied up in your business. That means, if you don’t adequately protect it, you could stand to lose nearly everything you’ve spent your life working for.

Columbus Business First recently published my six tips to help business owners protect their most valuable asset. I encourage you to check them out here as well.

  • Draw up a buy-sell agreement.
    Why: As the last will and testament of your business, your buy-sell agreement dictates will happen if a shareholder dies, becomes incapacitated, retires or is fired from the business.
  • Secure contracts for all key employees.
    Why: What would you do if one of your key employees left and took your customers and other employees with them? Before your worse-case-scenario has a chance to materialize, address your concerns in the form of a contract.
  • Have a succession plan.
    Why: Your company’s value could take a hit if you were to unexpectedly be absent from the business. Select and train your replacement sooner rather than later.
  • Comply with government regulations.
    Why: Some violations could cost your business hundreds of thousands of dollars – or more.
  • Protect your intellectual property.
    Why: Your ideas are valuable, especially if your ideas form the foundation of your business. When you protect your intellectual property with patents, copyrights and other legal agreements, you are protecting your business’s value.
  • Secure proper insurance coverage.
    Why: Without the right coverage, a single lawsuit, accident or natural disaster could take your business’s value to zero.

Want to learn more about how a business valuation can help you grow and protect your business? Check out my website at www.knowandgrow.com. You can also follow me on Twitter for helpful business tips throughout the day.

By Tim McDaniel, CPA/ABV, ASA, CBA (Dublin office)

Are you looking for more ways to protect your business? These articles could help!

Are Your Employees Skimming From The Top?

Businesses Beware: Sloppy Data Security Could Cost You

Can Your Business Survive An Employee Exodus?

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Business Leaders Were Reading What?!

Monday, December 28th, 2015

2015′s Most Popular Blog Posts

Best Business Blog Posts 2015- Ohio CPA FirmIf you take a moment to scroll through the list of categories, authors and archives on the right-hand side of this page, it’s pretty clear to see just how active Rea’s team of experts are when it comes to providing leaders in the business community with accurate, timely and easy to digest content. We are fortunate to have so much experience and expertise on our staff, and their eagerness to serve you better has allowed us to maintain a bi-weekly electronic newsletter, a quarterly print newsletter, three blogs and a handful of electronic segment specific newsletters. That’s a lot of content – but we are not even thinking about slowing down! I hope you hang around my lily pad for awhile. I’m pretty sure you’ll find a lot of great little tidbits to read about in 2016 too. Until then, I want to invite you to take a look at some of our most popular blog posts and articles. And, if you haven’t already, take a moment to look through the newsletters we offer and sign up to have news, tips and valuable information delivered to your inbox all year long!

Top 5 Dear Drebit Posts In 2015

Dear Drebit is updated every few days with timely information and advice. In addition to covering current trends and issues, readers are also invited to ask financial and business questions on the page, which will be answered by one of Rea’s industry experts. Here are last year’s top posts:

  1. How Far Back Can The IRS Go For Auditing?
  2. Theft Safeguards To Cause Tax Return Delays In Ohio
  3. Six Things 401K Plan Sponsors Need To Do Now
  4. New Adjustments Will Affect Your 2015 Tax Return
  5. File Faster With This Tax Prep Checklist

5 Most Popular Posts On Brushing Up Blog

Brushing Up: The Dental Accounting Blog features a variety of finance and business advice specifically tailored to dental professionals. From purchasing a practice, knowing what to expect from a career in dentistry and hiring the best staff for your practice to general accounting advice, tips for cashing out at retirement and tax tips, this blog is a valuable tool for dental professionals who are looking for ways to secure long-term success in their career. The year’s most-read blog posts are:

  1. How Sales & Use Taxes Apply To Ohio Dental Practices
  2. 6 QuickBooks Tips Every Dentist Should Know
  3. Could A Crown Be A Tax Deduction?
  4. 10 Year-End Tax Planning Strategies For Dentists
  5. Buying An Established Dental Practice? Master The Changeover 

Cultivating Your Business Readers Choose Top 5 2015 Posts

The Cultivating Your Business blog is a resource provided to clients and visitors on the firm’s Know & Grow website. Updated a few times per month, business owners have access to advice, tips and general insight into how to grow their businesses and realize an optimal return on their investment upon retirement. Here are the top blog posts from last year:

  1. Bad Buy-Sell Agreement Claims Another Family Dinner
  2. Will Your Summer Reading List Make You A Better Business Owner?
  3. WARNING: Free Business Valuation Offer Is Unbelievable
  4. Uncover The Secrets To Cashing In On Your Business
  5. How To Communicate To Your Employees That You’re Selling Your Business

Top 10 Articles In Rea’s Library In 2015

In addition to our blogs, the Rea team publishes a lot of other valuable content in print and electronic newsletters. We make sure that all these articles are easily accessible in our article library. This is where you will find many of our niche pieces as well as a lot of general accounting tips and insights. Take a look at some of our most popular posts over the last year.

  1. What Is The Mid-Quarter Convention?
  2. Dangers Of Paying Under The Table
  3. Revenue Recognition Changes Are Coming
  4. Football Ticket Deductions
  5. 401K Loans And Keeping Your Plan In Compliance
  6. Take Control Of Your Vendor Master In Nine Steps
  7. Why Your Traditional Employee Management Method Is Failing
  8. The Birth Of The Taxpayer’s Estate
  9. Parting Is Such Sweet Sorrow: But What About Your 401K?
  10. Purchasing Cards Compromise Business Security
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It’s OK To ‘Think Small’

Friday, November 20th, 2015

Revenue Growth Isn’t Always The Solution

Revenue Growth - Ohio CPA Firm

Your revenue is like the water level. When it’s high, it hides a lot; but when it’s low, problems begin to reveal themselves. Unfortunately, some business owners believe that the best way to fix their business is by adding revenue. What they don’t realize is that this tactic is simply masking the real problem.

Have you ever been white water rafting? When the water is high, you glide effortlessly through the river, expertly navigating the bends and slicing through the current – it’s exhilarating. Flash forward a few months later, after the water level has dropped, and it’s a completely different story. Where it was once smooth sailing, you are now confronted with a scattering of rocks, boulders, logs and branches. Your ability to progress through the course takes a hit.

Your revenue is like the water level in this example. When it’s high, it hides a lot; but when it’s low, problems begin to reveal themselves. Unfortunately, some business owners believe that the best way to fix their business is by adding revenue. What they don’t realize is that this tactic is simply masking the real problem.

Sometimes, More Is Less

If you want your business to be healthier, you can’t rely on revenue growth to solve your problems. In fact, you may find greater success if you start thinking small.

Businesses that are healthy tend to be able to generate healthy cash flow. This means that you need to pay attention to more than just your ability to generate revenue. For example, you could find great success if you were to tighten up your billing strategy. Oftentimes, business owners will only focus on their monthly revenue and forget to consider how long it actually takes for the money to roll in. Even though your company’s revenue looks great for the month of July, it could be September (or later) before you actually get paid. In the meantime, you are stuck playing the waiting game.

Instead of looking for more customers to cover the difference, start thinking small. Get rid of the extra baggage that’s holding you down. Revenue doesn’t mean a whole lot unless you have the cash to back it up. To that point, it may be time to stop doing business with clients who aren’t prompt when it’s time to pay their bills on time. Instead, be more selective when choosing who you will do business with.

What’s Holding You Back?

It can be a lot of work to identify what’s holding you back and sometimes you need to look at your business from a different perspective, some business owners find great success simply asking for help from an outsider. There is no one-size-fits all solution. The best way to take control of your business is to work with a trusted advisor.

A great place to start is by listening to our podcast, Unsuitable on Rea RadioEpisode 10: The Revenue Sin covers business health and what you can do to strengthen your cash flow. When you are done, click here for additional resources.

Do you have a business question you need help solving? Send it to podcast@reacpa.com and let us know what issues are challenging your business. We could feature your question on an upcoming episode of Unsuitable or in a blog post.

By Brad Martyn, Founder & CEO, FocusCFO

Looking for more ways to improve your business? Check out these articles:

Not All Growth Is Good Growth

5 Reasons Why Managing A Solid Cash Flow Is Just Good Business Sense

Drive Internal Cash Flow And Improve Profitability

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Stop The Family Drama With A Buy-Sell Agreement

Thursday, October 8th, 2015
Take control of your future with a buy-sell agreement - Unsuitable on Rea Radio

You don’t know what the future holds, but if you don’t take steps to prepare for the unknown you are leaving your business and your family vulnerable. Click here to listen to How To Ruin Thanksgiving Dinner on Unsuitable on Rea Radio, a new finance and business management podcast.

It seems like when the holiday season comes around everybody does their best to put their best foot forward and to portray the image of “the flawless family.” From the turkey dinner on Thanksgiving, to the Christmas cards featuring happy, loving families – we do all we can just to make sure everything is … perfect.

Listen to the podcast: How To Ruin Thanksgiving Dinner

The holiday season is also notorious for other less-than-perfect qualities, such as family fights, holiday shopping stress and, ultimately, increased depression and anxiety.

Now imagine you are battling the normal holiday stressors while trying to manage a family business. And what if your business is in crisis mode and your life, the future of your family members and the sustainability of your company hangs in the balance?

When you own a business with family or friends you already run the risk of business matters spilling over into your personal affairs. But when you haven’t invested the time and resources needed to plan ahead, you are leaving your business and your family vulnerable. Take control of the future of your business and the general well-being of your family all year long by knowing the true value of your business and investing in a proper buy-sell agreement.

Click here to read the full article.

By Tim McDaniel, CPA/ABV, ASA, CBA (Dublin office)

Business Valuations - Ohio CPA firmLearn more about the importance of securing a custom business valuation and buy-sell agreement. Listen to the How To Ruin Thanksgiving Dinner” podcast on Unsuitable on Rea Radio at www.reacpa.com/podcast or on iTunes or SoundCloud.

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Why would I want to listen to a podcast from an accounting firm?

Wednesday, October 7th, 2015
Unsuitable Podcast - Ohio CPA Firm

Mark Van Benschoten (left) talks with Doug Feller, a principal and financial advisor with Investment Partners, talks about wealth enhancement and investment tactics for an upcoming episode of Unsuitable on Rea Radio, a new financial and business advisory podcast from Rea & Associates. Click here to learn more about Unsuitable on Rea Radio.

I know what you’re thinking – listening to a podcast from an accounting firm is probably about as entertaining and insightful as watching paint dry. But Unsuitable on Rea Radio isn’t your typical accounting podcast, and here’s why.

Real, Simple Solutions

Who doesn’t like a good story? What about one that leaves you with greater insight into the financial wellness of your own company? And if you had a better idea of how other successful entrepreneurs manage their wealth, wouldn’t you try to follow their lead?

The professionals at Rea have seen a lot over the last several decades and they are willing to open the curtain just enough to provide you with the information to forge your own success. And on Unsuitable, they do just that.

An Effective Kick In The Pants

Unsuitable offers a little something for everybody and I am confident that this is a show that will not only help provide you with more clarity, but will motivate you to take the next step as a professional and as a business leader.

Look at what has already been discussed in the first four episodes:

And this is just the beginning. Look for episodes highlighting investment strategies, Affordable Care Act compliance and retirement preparedness – just to name a few.

Accountants Like To Laugh Too

This may come as a surprise to many since those in the accounting profession tend to be thought of as dry, stuffy, number-crunching fanatics, but that’s just not true – well, most of the time. The Rea team consists of some pretty humorous, outgoing folks and I think that the diverse sense of humor of our team shines through. Mark Van Benschoten, the host of the show, helps a lot, of course. He does an excellent job addressing each guest and makes them feel comfortable … then the show gets really good.

Just The Right Length

Our firm has 11 offices throughout Ohio, which means I do a lot of driving. When I’m on the road I like to listen to podcasts – and there are a lot of them out there! What I really like about Unsuitable, is that it’s long enough to be really informative and wraps up nicely before it reaches the point where I am wishing it would end. In fact, when it does end I find myself wanting to start the next one. Mark and his guests get right to the point of the show, provide examples and offer hard-hitting advice in a concise, enjoyable format – all while having a great time and avoiding stuffy accounting jargon.

Go to www.reacpa.com/podcast now and start listening or subscribe to Unsuitable on Rea Radio on iTunes or SoundCloud. I also want to encourage you to use #ReaRadio to join the conversation on Twitter and Facebook.

By Lee Beall, CPA (Dublin office)

Click here and start listening to Unsuitable on Rea Radio now!

 

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5 Financial Secrets Of Successful Business Owners

Tuesday, September 29th, 2015
Financial Secrets Of Successful Business Owners - Rea & Associates - Ohio CPA Firm

After following through with a 13-week cash flow for almost a year, you will have better insight into how to spend your profits to help your business generate additional cash and sales. Visit www.reacpa.com/podcast to learn more and listen to Rea’s podcast — Unsuitable on Rea Radio.

Many business owners find difficulty coming to terms with their financial obligations. They will dedicate long hours combing through their company’s expenses, invoices and payroll to arrive at an annual budget, only to let the report sit until it’s time to repeat the exercise again a year later. A 13-week rolling cash flow helps take the stress off business owners when it comes time to make important strategic decisions throughout the year. But in order to get your company back on the right track, you must be ready to change the way you look at your company’s finances. These five financial secrets of successful business owners will get you on the right track.

Listen To Unsuitable On Rea Radio – Why $1 Million Doesn’t Matter

1)     Know how much cash you have on hand.

We’re talking about tangible cash here; and to know how much you actually have on hand you will have to look beyond the ending balance on your business’s bank statement while not letting yourself get caught up in a sea of technical information, graphs and presentations. The three most important questions you should be asking every week are:

  • How much money do we have in the bank?
  • What is our accounts receivable balance?
  • Who do we owe and how much we owe them?

The other information and reports are still important, they just aren’t as critical when you have to make big decisions without a lot of time to ponder your company’s short- and long-term financial state.

2)     Understand your billing practices.

To get an accurate picture of your company’s cash flow, you will need to take a closer look at your current billing practices to find out if you are getting your bills out on a timely basis. Don’t be tempted to gloss over this step. It may surprise you to learn that a lot of decision-makers and business owners think they are on top of their billing activity, only to learn that they’re not. A 13-week cash flow budget will expose this weakness and will get you back on track.

3)     Delegate ownership of your cash flow. 

We are all busy and it’s easy to be enthusiastic about implementing a 13-week cash flow strategy — in theory. But when it’s time to actually put your strategy into action it’s easy to blame “lack of time” for why you put it off. The good news is that you can delegate the work to someone who has the time. You really can’t afford to ignore your cash flow. When you understand where your money is coming in from and where it’s going, you will begin to see positive results.

4)     Review your cash flow projection often.

While it’s great to write out an annual budget or a three-year-projection, most owners will push the document to the side … where it will begin to gather dust. Then, when the day comes when you need to know the financial state of your company for decision-making purposes, you are left with inaccurate, outdated information. When this happens, your effectiveness and accuracy as a leader is challenged. It doesn’t have to be though. When you review your cash flow regularly, you arm yourself with the tools need to make financially strategic decisions. For example, after following through with a 13-week cash flow for nearly a year, you will gain greater insight into how to spend your business profits to help generate the additional cash and sales needed to facilitate sustained growth.

5)     Put your accrual basis profit in its place.

While you may still need to have an accrual statement or generally accepted accounting principle statement to appease regulatory agencies, you would do well to remember that when it comes to the lifeblood of your business, cash flow is king. In all likelihood, businesses of all sizes should consider keeping two sets of records — an accrual and a cash basis statement — to maintain your company’s compliance among all stakeholders.

You can’t spend accrual basis profit. You can, however, spend cash basis profit. Which is why, at the end of the day, you’ll find that your banker, your lender, your shareholders, etc. … will take more interest in your cash flow strategy and your cash flow budget than your other reports.

Want to learn more? Click here to listen to Unsuitable on Rea Radio and find out “Why $1 Million Doesn’t Matter.”

By Dave Cain, CPA (Dublin office)

Visit www.reacpa.com/podcast for more episodes of Unsuitable on Rea Radio or click here to subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or click here to listen to the show on SoundCloud.

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Investing In Your Business’s Immortality

Monday, May 11th, 2015
Business Teamwork - Rea & Associates - Ohio CPA Firm

Ensuring that you have the right team in place – from the ground floor to upper management – is a solid, common sense strategy for business owners who are looking to add short-term and long-term value to their business. Not only are customers and clients more likely to equate your team’s passion with quality, which helps secure new business and develop long-term relationships, but the strength and self-sufficiency of your team is a major incentive to investors.

Go ahead. Take pride in all that you’ve accomplished. Relive the moment you decided to go into business and reflect on your trials and triumphs. And as you reminisce, identify everyone who helped you achieve your vision – because chances are you didn’t get where you are by yourself.

Make no mistake. In business, the strength of your team directly impacts your company’s success and overall val­ue. Therefore, it’s never been more im­portant to ensure that your exit from the company doesn’t lead to a “going out of business” sale.

Read: This Is An Intervention – Step Away From Your Business

Your Company’s Longevity

As a business owner, it’s your responsibility to continually evaluate your busi­ness. Part of the evaluation process is ensuring that the right people are in the right place to help guide and grow your company – even when you’re not around.

Whether they move on or retire, eventually every person on your leadership team will leave, including you. You must decide what kind of impact this will have on your company when it happens.

One of the best strategies you can em­brace is to become obsolete. That’s not to say that your work is not important, it just means that your team, your business, does not depend on you for its survival.

Every time you recruit an employee, you have an opportunity to reinforce your company’s mission. Do your due diligence to make sure the people you hire are on board with the company’s vision. They will continue to set the tone after you leave, which is why the qualities you consider when hiring a candidate should go beyond their education and experi­ence. Anyone you hire must have the passion to succeed, the capacity to learn and a personality that helps them easily overcome complicated situations. From entry-level to leadership positions, your ability to maintain a strong team ensures the longevity of your business.

Is Your Team Valuable?

Ensuring that you have the right team in place – from the ground floor to up­per management – is a solid, common sense strategy for business owners who are looking to add short- and long-term value to their business. Not only are customers and clients more likely to equate your team’s passion with quality, which helps secure new business and develop long-term relationships, but the strength and self-sufficiency of your team is a major incentive to investors.

Email Rea & Associates to learn more.

By Don McIntosh, CPA, CGFM, CFE (New Philadelphia office) and Tim McDaniel, CPA/ABV, ASA, CBA (Dublin office)

 

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This Is An Intervention – Step Away From Your Business

Tuesday, April 28th, 2015
Be The Leader You Want To Be - Rea & Associates - Ohio CPA Firm

Join organizations, attend events, and talk to other leaders about your business, your industry and your role in the world. It’s time to be the business leader you’ve always wanted to be.

As the driving force behind your company’s growth and success you have undoubtedly spent countless hours and dollars strategizing, networking and juggling a laundry list of managerial responsibilities. But your effort has paid off – today, you are praised for your work and are regarded as a leading entrepreneur within your industry. But maybe it feels like you have only begun to scratch the surface and that your business is long overdue for a growth spurt. While these are great challenges to have in the business world, if you are spending all your time in the office instead of hitting the pavement, it could seem like your ability to expand further is simply unattainable.

If only there were more hours in the day!

Read: Did You Know That Treating Your Business Like An Investment Can Lead To Wealth?

Throughout my career I have had the pleasure of working with many successful business owners. And while these men and women possess the skills, expertise and leadership traits essential for success in their respective industries, they have all learned that they are not immune to getting caught up in day-to-day managerial distractions. It can happen to anybody and before you know it you are caught up in a fruitless, energy-sapping, time-consuming headache that hurts your effectiveness as a business leader and prevents your company from achieving the growth and revenue you know it is capable of.

When that happens, it’s time to stop what you are doing, take a step back and reassess your organizational development strategy.


Step Away From Your Business – An Intervention – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

Work On Your Business, Not In It

“[The] executives who ignited the transformations from good to great did not first figure out where to drive the bus and then get people to take it there,” says Jim Collins in his book Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap … And Others Don’t. “No, they first got the right people on the bus (and the wrong people off the bus) and then figured out where to drive it.”

In other words, if you want to continue to grow a successful company, you can’t do it alone. While this advice may sound cliché, your ability to develop a strong organizational structure is directly responsible for your company’s long-term success. But it’s not easy and getting “the right people on the bus (and the wrong people off)” has been the single hardest objective for some of the most talented business owners. But once you are able to achieve this step, you will finally be able to maximize your time and talent by working on your business, instead of in your business.

How To Lead Your Business By Developing Your Organization

  1. First you must understand that organizational development is a never-ending process. To get started, develop a formal organizational chart and take time to identify “the right people” to effectively fill the top positions on your chart. To aid in the flexibility and evolution of your business’s organizational development, consider forming an advisory board to bring outside objectivity to the process.
  2. Next, step away from the daily grind of running your business. It’s time to be the business leader you’ve always wanted to be. Join organizations, attend events, and talk to other leaders about your business, your industry and your role in the world. Doing so will help you earn respect and influence throughout your community.
  3. Once you put some distance between yourself and the day-to-day grind of your company, you will be able to lead your company more objectively. This is an ideal time to observe your current organizational structure and brainstorm strategies to help you achieve your future success with your inner circle. Just make sure that those who make up your inner circle are not like you, will tell you the truth, will add value to you and your organization and are willing to have crucial conversations.
  4. Now that you have solidified your role as a business leader, it’s time to empower those in your organization to take ownership of the company and their place in it. This includes giving them the ability to make decisions while supporting and encouraging them and demonstrating your willingness to follow their lead.
  5. One of the most critical responsibilities of a business leader is planning for the future of your company. How will you transition your business once it is time to retire? What should you do now to ensure your company’s longevity? Do you know how much your business is actually worth? In order to protect your most important investment, your business, it is important to thoroughly understand the value of your business and develop a plan for its continued growth.

Starting your business is hard; growing your business is even harder. You will make mistakes. When you do get it wrong,act swiftly to make the necessary changes.

Maximize your time and talent. Email Rea & Associates today to learn more growth and development tips for your business. I won’t say that we have seen it all, but we have certainly seen a lot.

By Mike Taylor, CPA (Millersburg office)

 

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Is A Sale-Leaseback Transaction Right For Your Business?

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015
Sales-Leaseback Transaction

Is it a better business strategy to enter into a sale-leaseback transaction on your current office building or other business property? Make sure you know the pros and cons before making any decisions – Rea & Associates – Ohio CPA Firm

Are you looking for a plan to increase your business’s cash flow? If you own business property, you may be able to benefit by entering into a sale-leaseback transaction. But while there several great benefits to this type of agreement, there are also some significant drawbacks. So, before you draw up the paperwork, schedule a time to meet with your financial advisor to find out if the benefit outweighs the risk.

Advantages Of A Sale-Leaseback Transaction

A sale-leaseback transaction occurs when you, the real estate owner and occupier, sell your property to a third party on the condition that they agree to lease the property to you. Entering into this type of arrangement has several benefits, including increasing your business’ cash flow while freeing your business up to allocate the capital to other areas of your business. Additional benefits include:

  • As the seller and eventual lessor, you essentially maintain control of the property, which prevents operational disruptions from occurring.
  • Assuming the current property is financed with debt, this long-term debt can be eliminated from the balance sheet under certain lease arrangements.
  • From a tax perspective, you gain an additional annual “write-off” for the portion of rent related to the land (as land is not depreciated).

Drawbacks Of A Sale-Leaseback Transaction

Perhaps the most significant disadvantage of entering into this type of agreement is that you stand to lose the flexibility that comes with owning the property outright since these transactions usually are for longer terms than a typical property lease (15 or more years). The typical sale-leaseback transaction takes the form of a “triple net lease,” which usually states that you, as the tenant, will be responsible for the net real estate taxes, net building insurance and net common area maintenance. Other disadvantages include:

  • The loss of the real estate’s appreciation value over the course of a lengthy lease term.
  • Significant income tax impact that comes in to play when a property’s sale price significantly exceeds the property’s “book value.” This typically occurs when you are selling a property that has been owned for a long period of time prior to the sale.
  • A decrease in your Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation and Amortization (EBITDA) as your depreciation expense on the property is replaced by the rent expense.

The financial benefits of sale-leasebacks must be balanced with your unique strategic and operating considerations. A financial advisor and business consultant can help identify whether this option is right for you and your business. Email Rea & Associates to learn more about sale-leaseback transactions and other strategic business decisions. By Ben Antonelli, CPA (Dublin office)  

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‘Ghost Assets’ Haunting Your Business? How Can A Small Business Owner Keep More Money In Their Pocket? How Will A Tax Credits and Incentives Plan Benefit Your Business?

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‘Ghost Assets’ Haunting Your Business?

Tuesday, October 7th, 2014

The IRS recently issued taxpayer-friendly guidance regarding the disposition of a component of real or personal property.

Under the Internal Revenue Code, taxpayers are required to capitalize certain amounts paid to acquire, produce or improve real or tangible personal property during the year and that is used for a trade, business or for the production of income. However, prior to the issuance of new regulations in 2013 taxpayers were unable to write-off the remaining cost of a component of a larger asset or building that was repaired or replaced (e.g. a roof). In fact, under the old rules, it was not uncommon for business owners to be required to depreciate “ghost assets” – assets that were removed or replaced by the taxpayer and are no longer in service.

The good news is that the IRS has changed its mind on these, so-called, “partial dispositions.”

So, What’s Changing?

Beginning Jan. 1, 2014, taxpayers were able to deduct the remaining cost of such components in the year they were replaced/repaired by making an election on their tax return.

Additionally, the IRS allowed taxpayers to apply the regulations to dispositions that had already happened in prior years as long as the ghost assets were still being depreciated.

What was unclear until recently was how a taxpayer could effectively make the election on a retroactive basis given that businesses were required to file their 2013 year tax returns before the IRS had issued definitive guidance.

The IRS’ Response

The IRS officially announced a specific revenue procedure that provides a limited opportunity for taxpayers to write-off assets that were disposed of during a prior year. The guidance outlines the procedures necessary for taxpayers to secure the write-off, as well as what documents they should include when filing their request. If you do plan to write off a ghost asset from a previous year, you must make plans do so now as this retroactive election opportunity is time sensitive. Taxpayers who miss this opportunity will be required to continue depreciating these ghost assets. For some, this means that you could be depreciating ghost assets for another 15-20 years.

Are you a business owner who is still paying the IRS for assets that you no longer have or that have been replaced? Do you want to learn more about the IRS’s new rules on ghost assets and how they can impact your business? Email Rea & Associates to find out if you can write off ghost assets that continue to haunt your business.

Author: Chris Axene, CPA (Dublin office)

 

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When Should You Start Thinking About Succession Planning?

Monday, February 10th, 2014

You’re busy serving customers. Managing employees. Overseeing the day-to-day operations of your business. Stepping down as the head of your company may not be on your radar, but sooner or later you’ll need to think about what will happen to your business once you’re out of the picture. We recommend that business owners start thinking about their business succession plan at least five years before planning to implement it.  (more…)

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What Are 6 Things You Can Do To Improve The Health Of Your Business in 2014?

Monday, December 30th, 2013

Are you out of breath from the impact the economy had on your business during the last several years? Is it time to develop some New Year’s resolutions that will make a difference in your business? Adopting a new diet, jumping on the treadmill or committing to run a half marathon are common items on the “personal” resolution menu. However, is it time to add energy and resources to your resolutions in order to improve the health of your business?  (more…)

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What Are The Top 5 Challenges Business Owners Face in Today’s Economy?

Thursday, September 26th, 2013

You may find that being your own boss is extremely rewarding. Starting a business from the ground up takes a lot of hard work, and you’ve been seeing the fruits of your labor. But your success doesn’t come without challenges. Business owners are facing some tough challenges these days, and you yourself may be experiencing some of these growing pains. Here’s a list of the top 5 challenges I’m seeing business owners like yourself facing in today’s economy. Do any of these resonate with you?

(more…)

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Did You Know That Treating Your Business like an Investment Can Lead to Wealth?

Wednesday, June 19th, 2013

If you’re a business owner, did you know that you can significantly increase your net wealth by simply changing the way you look at your business? (more…)

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What Legacy Do You Want to Leave?

Friday, April 12th, 2013

Last year, I was consulting with a client who owned a business that was worth over $20.0 million. He said that one of his advisers told him “Why waste your time and money developing an exit and succession plan? You will be dead and won’t care and let others take care of it after you die.”

I guess that’s a good plan – if you don’t mind the chaos it creates for your family members and if your legacy is not important to you. (more…)

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How Do You Choose a Business Exit Strategy?

Thursday, January 17th, 2013

Exit strategies are the options that you have to leave your business.  There are only a few exit strategies that Ohio business owners can choose from and each will provide you with a different level of proceeds when you leave. All strategies will require planning and time to implement.

It’s never too soon to start planning your exit. You will eventually leave your business, and it’s better to do so before a life-changing event forces you out. The sooner you plan, the more options you will have. (more…)

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How Do You Protect the Value of Your Business?

Friday, August 31st, 2012

One of the most basic individual investment principals is the concept of diversification. As an investor, diversification can protect you from a large drop in your portfolio due to the poor performance of any one investment.

If you own a business, the business value is most likely more than half of their entire net worth.  You cannot simply call your investment advisor and quickly sell a part of your business to diversify.  It is possible to sell a partial interest in a business, but this is not available to all business owners and requires significant amount of planning.

So, what can you do to protect your net worth from dropping from a large decrease in the value of your business?  (more…)

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Is Now the Time to Gift a Business Interest?

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

2012 Gift Tax Exemptions and Business Planning

As you go about your day-to-day work within your business, you might not be thinking about what will happen when it’s time for you to leave the company. However, recent changes in the gift tax laws have created a window of opportunity that could allow you to transfer more of your business interests for less tax liability than at any other time in history. (more…)

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What’s Your “Get Out of Business” Plan?

Friday, May 18th, 2012

You’ve worked hard to build your business and probably can’t imagine a time when it won’t be a major part of your life.  But, someday, you’ll approach retirement and you’ll want to spend more time enjoying your life and less time balancing your books.

Maybe you’ll want to leave your business to your daughter.  Maybe you’ll want to sell it and cash out.  Either way, business transition doesn’t just happen.  It isn’t serendipitous.  You need a “get out of business” or succession plan. (more…)

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Do You Need a Business Prenup?

Tuesday, May 15th, 2012

About 25 percent of businesses fail within the first year, according to Small Business Trends.  Only 44 percent survive for four years.  What if your business doesn’t make it?

If you don’t have a buy-sell agreement, things could get hairy. Or if you developed one in haste and never update it, the buy-out probably won’t be fair to all parties. The hassles from litigation that result from faulty buy-sell agreements could last for years and negatively impact your business. (more…)

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How do you create a succession plan?

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012

One measure of great business leaders is that their businesses continue to thrive once they leave their positions.  Visionary leaders captain the ship today while making plans for someone else to take the helm tomorrow.  Proactive succession planning allows businesses to continue their smooth sailing long after the captain abandons ship. (more…)

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How can you protect your family business?

Tuesday, March 13th, 2012

Did you know that research shows that young men and women today will likely have more spouses than children? Unfortunately, that could have a huge impact on your family business. (more…)

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How do you follow IRS regulations when gifting a business interest?

Friday, February 17th, 2012

Lately we’ve been surprised by how many people are thinking about filing a gift tax return without a business valuation. We’ve had a few conversations with people who are under the impression that they don’t need to attach a valuation of their business interest to the gift tax return.

Before you file your return without a valuation from a professional, consider the consequences: (more…)

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Receive Rental Income? Start Keeping Records in 2011

Friday, January 14th, 2011

Corporations, partnerships, individuals and trusts that receive rental income from property should plan to keep additional records in 2011. As a result of 2010 legislation, they will be required to issue IRS Form 1099-MISC to service providers, such as plumbers, painters and accountants, of $600 or more during the 2011 tax year. (more…)

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How do I keep my succession plan on course?

Thursday, January 13th, 2011

The future of your family business might not be in the front of your mind as you go about your day-to-day routine. But if you have a defined plan that everyone is aware of, you can more effectively prepare for a successful transition when the time comes to put it into place. (more…)

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How Does Communication, Timing Impact My Business Succession Plan?

Monday, December 13th, 2010

Over the past few weeks, we have discussed steps to follow when you develop a succession plan for your business. First, we made the decision to do a succession plan. We looked at the value of the business. We explored all of the options for transition. And we determined your personal and professional goals and those of your family and key personnel. Now it’s time to set a course of action. (more…)

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Succession Planning: Do You Know Your Options?

Monday, November 15th, 2010

Are you actively planning a transition for the business you worked so hard to build? The majority of North American businesses are family-owned, yet just about 30 percent make it to the second generation. Even fewer reach the third generation. As more and more business owners prepare to retire, more and more businesses will face the issue of succession – whether they are prepared or not. This article discusses the third in a series of tips to help family-owned businesses begin the succession planning process. (more…)

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Have you included a business valuation in your succession plan?

Friday, November 5th, 2010

In an earlier post we discussed the important step of making the decision to begin the succession planning process. Once you have made the decision to begin the process, knowing the value of your business is the second crucial step in the transition plan. (more…)

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how do you evaluate and price a product line for sale?

Friday, October 29th, 2010

The price paid for a product line (or a business) is typically determined by a return on investment (ROI) calculation. The buyer estimates the future benefit stream from the product line and then determines the required rate of return that is needed to entice them to purchase it. The required rate of return is a function of how risky the future benefit stream is.  If the future benefit is in doubt or risky, the required rate of return will be higher. There is an inverse relationship between the required rate of return and the value of a product line. Our job as business valuators is to determine what the future benefit stream will be and what is the proper rate of return required for that benefit stream.

Whenever you are considering selling a business or a product line it’s important to get a true value by using a professional business evaluation. Usually the seller does not have any experience selling a product line or a business, and not knowing all the facts could cost tens of thousands of dollars. The buyer may be very sophisticated. There are many complex issues in addition to negotiating a price in a transaction that should be considered, such as the terms of a deal and the purchase price allocation. 

The terms include whether the price will be paid in cash or by a note or stock. If there is a note, the question becomes “Will this note be secured?” “Are there conditions required to be met by the seller to be paid?” and “How long will it take to pay back?” Purchase price allocation is critical to any deal. It can be the difference between paying a 15 percent tax rate on your gain or 40 percent tax rate.  

As you can see, there are many considerations to selling a product line or business. Don’t attempt to navigate the complex area of business transactions alone.

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Is it time to start planning the sale of your business?

Friday, July 23rd, 2010

Every business strategy should include an exit plan for leaving the business. This can hinge on the owner’s personal financial and estate planning efforts, and a successful transition depends on many factors. (more…)

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Why should I treat my business as an investment?

Friday, April 23rd, 2010

To answer this question, think about the stocks and bonds you may have invested in. Everyone wants to maximize the value and annual return on their investments. But many owners of closely-held businesses don’t place the same attention and care to determine the value of their businesses or work to improve their return on their largest investment.

Just like your stock portfolio, your business requires tending to help it create greater wealth. And just as you pay a fee of about one percent of your portfolio to an investment advisor to track and value your assets, you should plan the same to invest in the valuation and management of your business value. Typically 50-70 percent of your net work is tied up in your business. If you could double its value, wouldn’t you do it? Other businesses have seen this type of return and you can too. (more…)

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