Archive for the ‘Business Advice’ Category

Businesses Beware: Sloppy Data Security Could Cost You

Wednesday, August 26th, 2015

Defend Against A Data Breach: Best Practices For Businesses - Rea & Associates - Ohio CPA FirmAs if you didn’t have enough keeping you up at night, the topic of data security continues to send collective shivers up the spines of business owners worldwide. Unfortunately, the Aug. 24, ruling by the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit didn’t make matters any better (or less expensive) for businesses guilty of failing to protect their customers’ data. In fact, companies that utilize poor security practices that ultimately lead to a breach of consumer data are at risk of facing further disciplinary action and penalties.

Read Also: How Prepared Is Your Business For A Potential IT Disaster?

What does the FTC’s Courtroom Win Mean To Business Owners?

If you haven’t taken data security seriously in the past, it’s time to get real serious about it real quick.

Prior to the ruling, companies at the center of a data breach had to battle with lawsuits while working to rebuild their reputations. Now, in addition to litigation and negative headlines, your organization must also risk being fined by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Businesses can no longer operate with a subpar data security infrastructure. Those that do are at risk of losing everything.

The court upheld the FTC’s 2012 lawsuit against Wyndham Worldwide, a company known for operating hotels and time-shares. Records show that the FTC filed complaints against Wyndham for three data breaches occurring in 2008 and 2009, which resulted in more than $10.6 million in fraudulent charges. In its decision, the appeals court reaffirmed previous rulings that found Wyndham to be responsible for implementing better security practices, which would have helped prevent such breaches from occurring in the first place.

According to the FTC’s argument, software used at Wyndham-owned hotels stored credit card information as readable text, hotel computers lacked a system for monitoring malware, there was no requirement for user identification and or to make password difficult for hackers to guess, the company failed to use firewalls and, ultimately, failed to employ reasonable measures to detect and prevent unauthorized access to the computer network or to conduct security investigations.

“Today’s Third Circuit Court of Appeals decision reaffirms the FTC’s authority to hold companies accountable for failing to safeguard consumer data,” said FTC Chairwoman Edith Ramirez. “It is not only appropriate, but critical, that the FTC has the ability to take action on behalf of consumers when companies fail to take reasonable steps to secure sensitive consumer information.”

Next Steps For Businesses

With regard to the case between the FTC and Wyndham, the next chapter of the story is uncertain. While the win in the courtroom has helped put some wind in the FTC’s sails, the commission has yet to levy any penalties or assertions against the defendant. What is clear, however, is that a data security breach is a very real threat – one that is felt by nearly every business in the world. Furthermore, as technology continues to advance and hackers adapt, the security procedures businesses deploy must be top-notch to avoid further complications and costs associated with a sloppy security infrastructure.

Will you be ready when disaster strikes? Email Rea & Associates today to learn what you can do to protect your business from unforeseen threats.

By Joe Welker, CISA (New Philadelphia office)

Want to learn more about how to protect your business from a data security crisis? Check out these articles:

Could Your Company Be Ransomware’s Next Victim?
Don’t Turn A Blind Eye To PCI Compliance
How Much Is Your Data Worth To Criminals?

Share Button

How to ensure your plans aren’t bigger than your finances in times of growth

Monday, August 17th, 2015

Growth is the goal for many companies — whether you get that growth from adding another location, forming an alliance, adding services, diversifying into other areas or merging with/acquiring another business. But not all growth is good. So, it’s critical that you properly manage it. Smart Business recently talked with Kent Beachy about monitoring and managing your business’s growth.

For example, when growth is on the horizon, construction companies will go out and take on more work than they can handle. They have to pay their labor weekly, but they may not get paid for 60 or 90 days. A big part of growth is being able to finance it; you must have the right financing sources, such as built-up profits and/or a line of credit.

To learn more about how to set up the right systems to monitor your financial accounting and cash flow in times of growth, read the full article on Smart Business’ website. 

Want to read more articles about business growth, check these out:

Don’t Shy Away From Business Debt

Getting Back To Business: How Outsourcing May Provide Relief To Your Business

Do Your Business Metrics Need an Oil Change?

Share Button

Dear Drebit: Is There A More Customer-Friendly OUF-8 Notice?

Tuesday, August 11th, 2015
Unclaimed Funds - OUF-8 - Rea & Associates - Ohio CPA Firm

Unclaimed funds may include savings, checking, certificates of deposit accounts, payroll (wages, underlying shares principal), insurance proceeds, credit balances, customer deposits, traveler’s checks, money orders and other intangible interests or benefits that have had no activity over a specific period.

Dear Drebit: Is there a more customer-friendly OUF-8 notice businesses can provide to account holders? Sincerely, Unclaimed Funds In New Albany

Dear Unclaimed Funds:

You know that feeling you get when you pull a forgotten $20 dollar bill out from deep inside your jeans’ pocket; faded and pressed from being through a wash cycle or two. It always kind of seems like the cash just materialized out of thin air. In fact, maybe you even “remember” spending it … But alas, there it is, as plain as the gills between my toes.

Read Also: What Do I Need To Know About Unclaimed Property in Ohio?

Unclaimed funds are kind of like that too, but instead of finding a bit of cash in your pocket, you will likely find a notification in your mailbox.

Unclaimed funds may include savings, checking, certificates of deposit accounts, payroll (wages, underlying shares principal), insurance proceeds, credit balances, customer deposits, traveler’s checks, money orders and other intangible interests or benefits that have had no activity over a specific period.

Businesses are responsible for notifying account holders of their unclaimed funds by using the official Notice of Unclaimed Funds Form (also known as OUF-8), which will be sent to the account owner’s last known address. The purpose of this form is to notify you that the funds will be remitted to the state as unclaimed funds if you do not claim them over the next 30 days. NOTE: Your unclaimed funds cannot be remitted to the state until the 30-day period has expired.

Therefore, because the OUF-8 is the official form used throughout the State of Ohio, the answer to your question is no, there is not a more customer-friendly OUF-8 notice available. That being said, you are not necessarily required to complete the form in its entirety. The only information you must include is the:

  • Recipient/account owner’s name
  • Recipient/account owner’s address
  • The dollar amount in question.

From there, it is up to you to decide if you want to provide the recipient with more customer-friendly information.

For example, you may like the idea of including a cover letter with your OUF-8 forms as a way to provide helpful, more personalized and branded information to the account holder. The letter might include information about your business as well as instructions for claiming the funds. It may also be a good idea to inform them of what will happen if the account owner does not claim the funds within the next 30 days. Just remember that a cover letter is only meant as a supplement to the official OUF-8 form. The OUF-8 may either be sent on its own or with your customized cover letter – the cover letter cannot be sent in lieu of the OUF-8 form.

Unclaimed Fund Clarity

I certainly hope I could clear things up for you about the unclaimed funds/OUF-8 form; but if you have additional questions, please do not hesitate to ask the financial experts at Rea & Associates.

How Can Drebit Help You?

Readers, do you have questions about taxes, accounting, succession planning, fraud detection and other general business topics but don’t know who to ask? Drebit has answers. You are more than welcome to fill out the form at the top, right side of this page. You can also click here to reach out to one of our expert financial advisors directly. If you like the Dear Drebit blog, why not click here to subscribe to get news, advice and general insight delivered directly to your mailbox?

Want to learn more about unclaimed funds? Check out these articles for more great information. 

Free Money May Be Waiting for You!

Is Your Business in the Crosshairs? Ohio Commerce Div. Examines Taxpayers for Unclaimed Funds

Don’t Forget to File State and Local Taxes

Share Button

Like Losing Your Wallet – Only Worse

Friday, July 31st, 2015
Retirement Plan Returns- Ohio CPA Firm

Typically, owners of businesses and their spouses who fail to file their annual retirement plan returns are in full-scale crisis mode – and rightfully so, since missing this deadline results in a penalty that’s about the size of a small fortune.

For most of us, misplacing our keys, losing sight of our shoes and occasionally forgetting to pay the phone bill on time is not a catastrophic phenomenon. It happens; and most likely we will freak out for a minute, find what we were looking for and move on – only to repeat our dysfunctional routine countless times over the course of a lifetime. Forgetting to file your retirement plan returns on the other hand … well, let’s just say that’s typically not a stress-free event.

Read Also: Do You Know What Your Retirement Plan Is Costing You?

Typically, owners of businesses and their spouses who fail to file their annual retirement plan returns (Form 5500-EZ) are in full-scale crisis mode – and rightfully so, since missing this deadline results in a penalty that’s about the size of a small fortune. To be more precise, in years past, those who failed to meet their filing obligation could face a penalty totaling up to $15,000 per return. Fortunately, the IRS recently announced that instead of facing such an extreme late fee, eligible business owners can take advantage of a “low-cost penalty relief program.”

How Much Would You Pay?

The relief initiative, which started as a one-year pilot program in 2014, was tremendously successful, resulting in the collection of about 12,000 late returns. Because of this success, the program secured it’s permanency in May of this year. According to the news release, the program allows eligible business owners and their spouses to file late returns and only pay a $500 penalty for each return submitted with a maximum of $1,500 per plan. Because the IRS caps the maximum penalty at $1,500, applicants are encouraged to include multiple late returns in a single submission.

Eligibility

The IRS says that businesses with plans that cover the owner or the business’s partners (depending on how the business is set up) and their spouses are eligible to take advantage of this low-cost plan. Complete information about the program can be found by clicking here.

Learn More

Remember, your return must be filed annually no later than the end of the seventh month following the close of your plan year. So, for example, if your plan is governed by the calendar-year, as most are, your 2014 return was due today (Friday, July 31, 2015). Did you fail to file your small business’s annual retirement plan returns? Would you like to find out if you qualify for this program? Email a retirement plan expert at Rea & Associates and take control of your IRS debt now.

By Andrea McLane, QKA (Dublin office)

Want to read more about the importance of Retirement Plan Compliance?
Check out these articles:

401(k) Loans and Keeping Your Plan In Compliance
Retirement Roulette
The ‘Van Halen Philosophy’ of Retirement Plan Compliance

Share Button

How to set up internal controls on limited resources

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2015

Setting up internal controls in your small or midsized business is no easy task. It can be very time confusing, plus running the day-to-day operations always takes priority. I recently spoke with Smart Business to discuss what businesses and organizations with limited resources can do to implement internal controls.

If I handed you a briefcase of $100,000 and said, ‘Here hold this for me,’ would you be OK with that? … [What] if it was $500,000 or $1 million? That’s what you’re doing when you give full access to information and resources with no one monitoring it.”

To find out what your organization can do now and read the full article, visit Smart Business’s website or check out some of the articles below.

By Michaela McGinn, CPA (Dublin office)

Want to learn more about internal controls for your business? Check out these articles:

10 Ways To Implement Internal Controls With Limited Resources

What Are The Top 10 Signs Your Business’s Internal Controls Aren’t Strong?

Does Your Company Have Solid Internal Controls?

Share Button

Could Your Company Be Ransomware’s Next Victim?

Wednesday, July 8th, 2015
Preempt A Crisis - Rea & Associates - Ohio CPA Firm

While there is no surefire way to prevent a Ransomware attack on your data, it’s wise to implement the following best practices to reduce the possibility of infection or reinfection.

The malware known as CryptoLocker or CryptoWall continues to be a major concern for individuals and companies alike. So much so, that the FBI saw fit to issue a warning just last month and help raise further awareness about the threat.

According to the FBI, this Ransomware continues to evolve, which helps it avoid user’s virus detection software applications – even if they are current. Since April 2014, reported the FBI, there have been 992 incidents of CryptoLocker reported. These occurrences have resulted in the loss of around $18 million.

Read Also: How Much Is Your Data Worth To Criminals?

The Threat Is Real

Ransomware is a computer infection that’s been programmed to encrypt all files of known file types on your local computer and your server’s shared drives. Once it takes hold, it’s all but impossible for you to regain access to the data that’s been infected. Once this happens, you have one of two choices. You can:

  1. Restore their machine by using backup media, or
  2. Accommodate the hacker’s demands and pay up.

As a direct result of my experience as an IT audit manager, I have been made aware of several situations in which businesses were left with no choice but to succumb to the demands of malicious cybercriminals carrying out Ransomware attacks. And while the companies I have worked with were finally able to obtain their assailant’s encryption key code to unencrypt and regain access to their data after the ransom was paid, others are not as lucky – after all, the FBI has reported $18 million worth of losses in just over a year. Furthermore, there are no guarantees that you won’t be targeted again in the future.

Preempt A Crisis

While there is no surefire way to prevent a Ransomware attack on your data, it’s wise to implement the following best practices to reduce the possibility of infection or reinfection.

  • Implement mandatory computer safety training for all employees and implement and test an IT Disaster Recovery Plan in place.
  • Always use reputable antivirus software and a firewall and be sure to keep both up to date.
  • Put your popup blockers to good use. Doing so will help remove the temptation to click on an ad that could infect your computer.
  • Limit access to company’s data by ensuring that only a few employees have access to certain folders and data. You can facilitate this type of action by conducting annual reviews of your company’s employee access rights.
  • Backup all company-owned content. Then if you do become infected, instead of paying the ransom, you can simply have the Ransomware wiped from your system and then reinstall your files once it’s safe again to do so.
  • Never click on suspicious emails or attachments, especially if they come from an email address you don’t recognize. And actively avoid websites that raise suspicion.

Shut Down The Attack

If you are surfing the Web and a popup ad or message appears to alert you that a Ransomware attack is in progress, disconnect from the Internet immediately. Breaking the connection between the hacker and your data could help stop the spread of additional infections or data losses. In addition to informing your company’s IT department about the threat or occurrence, be sure to file a complaint with your local law enforcement agency. The IC3, formerly known as the Internet Fraud Complaint Center, also encourages you to file a report at www.IC3.gov.

Email Rea & Associates to learn more about the importance of your company’s online security.

By Joe Welker, CISA (New Philadelphia office)

 

Related Articles

Beware Of The Small Business Wire Transfer Scam
Could A Cyber-Attack Cripple Your Business In 2015?
8 Tips For Crafting A Strong Password

Share Button

10 Ways To Implement Internal Controls With Limited Resources

Tuesday, July 7th, 2015
How To Implement Internal Controls With Limited Resources - Rea & Associates - Ohio CPA Firm

Putting internal controls to work in your business doesn’t have to be an overwhelming task and you don’t necessarily need to beef up your workforce to get started. Start by simply picking a few key controls that can be easily woven into your daily or monthly processes and begin implementing a few changes at a time.

You’ve probably heard about how critical it is to establish internal controls throughout your business. But if you happen to own a small or midsize company, you may have dismissed this best practice in favor of maintaining your daily operations, optimizing customer service and streamlining your growth initiative. While running a successful business greatly depends on your ability to manage a variety of responsibilities, don’t let yourself become complacent when it comes to protecting your lifework from fraudulent activity. The mistake of ignoring the importance of internal controls in your business could end up costing you greatly.

Read Also: Where There’s Smoke, There’s Fire: 5 Internal Control Tips That Can Save Your Business From Fraud

Who’s Watching Your Money?

Would you be comfortable asking someone to watch a briefcase full of your cash, say $100,000? What if it held $500,000 or $1 million? Are you confident that your money would be there when you returned? Believe it or not, that’s essentially what you are doing every day when you run your business without internal controls – you are willingly handing over full access to your most valuable asset.

How To Address Your Internal Control Needs

Even if you don’t have the resources to implement a comprehensive internal control structure, there are still options available that can effectively provide your business with a level of oversight. Before you get started, be sure to consider the difference between preventative controls and detective controls.

As the owner of a small- to midsize-business, you may want to consider implementing a strategy that takes advantage of detective controls, which are typically put in place for the purpose of reviewing data for human error while ensuring that your assets remain secure. One example of this type of control is when, after your accounts have been reconciled, a reconciliation review is conducted to ensure accuracy.

Because of their size, smaller companies are more likely to give a few individuals full access to their business’s funds. These employees are often in charge of making deposits, issuing checks, managing payroll and performing monthly bank reconciliations. Enacting detective controls will not only provide you with the peace of mind you need, it may help take weight off of the shoulders of a trustworthy employee who would rather not have their trust questioned.

Preventative controls, on the other hand, are established by companies seeking to ensure that something doesn’t happen in advance. An example of a preventative control is when transaction limits and segregation of duties are established. This type of control can be very effective, but are oftentimes more difficult for smaller companies to establish due to the lack of resources they can commit to such a strategy.

10 Ways To Implement Internal Controls In Your Business

  1. Document and re-evaluate your operational processes (at least) annually.
  2. Make sure that more than one employee is familiar with your company’s operational processes to protect your business against unforeseeable circumstances, such as sickness, job loss or death.
  3. Conduct monthly reconciliations of key accounts (i.e. receivables, cash, inventory, payables, payroll costs, etc.) Then have these monthly reconciliations independently reviewed.
  4. Implement an approval process for employee spending.
  5. Establish transaction limits.
  6. Restrict access to your company’s general ledger to only a few key individuals.
  7. Review your vendor lists to ensure that they are current and accurate.
  8. Assign someone to review standard and nonstandard journal entries.
  9. Form a policy for creating credit limits for customers – and review it regularly.
  10. Review whether there are other areas unique to your business where employees may be able to manipulate information and identify how to monitor them.

Putting internal controls to work in your business doesn’t have to be an overwhelming task and you don’t necessarily need to beef up your workforce to get started. Start by simply picking a few key controls that can be easily woven into your daily or monthly processes and begin implementing a few changes at a time. Before you know it, aspects of your internal control strategy will become so commonplace that you may begin to wonder how you ever got by without them.

Email Rea & Associates to learn more about the benefits of an internal control strategy.

By Michaela McGinn, CPA (Dublin office)

 

Related Articles

What Are The Top 10 Signs Your Business’s Internal Controls Aren’t Strong?

Does Your Audit Process Protect You From Fraud?

Does Your Company Have Solid Internal Controls?

Share Button

Don’t Turn A Blind Eye To PCI Compliance

Thursday, July 2nd, 2015
PCI Compliance and Data Security - Rea & Associates - Ohio CPA Firm

Although you may employ a vendor to process credit card payments, it is still your client’s data and the ultimate need to protect that data is assumed by you.

You probably don’t have a lot of spare time on your hands. Between managing your business and employees, to ensuring your clients’ needs are being met. The last thing you might be concerned about is adhering to Payment Card Industry (PCI) Data Security compliance standards. But hold up. If your business (or any of your vendors) deals with client cardholder data or stores this information anywhere in your business’s IT systems, PCI standards are not something to ignore. It could be the difference between your business surviving and thriving or going down the drain.

PCI Data Security Best Practices

In November 2013, the Payment Card Industry (PCI) Data Security Standard version 3 was released. There were five requirements defined as “best practices.” And as of June 30, 2015, these requirements are mandatory and may affect your organization.

The Payment Card Industry (PCI) Data Security Standard v3.0 data sheet describes the need for compliance as: “All applications that store, process, or transmit cardholder data are in scope for an entity’s PCI DSS assessment, including applications that have been validated to PA-DSS.”

The two requirements that could most affect your organization are Requirements 12.9 and 9.9.

  • Requirement 12.9 – Additional requirements for service providers: Service providers acknowledge in writing to customers that they are responsible for the security of cardholder data the service provider possesses or otherwise stores, processes, or transmits on behalf of the customer, or to the extent that they could impact the security of the customer’s cardholder data environment.
  • Requirement: 9.9 – Protect devices that capture payment card data via direct physical interaction with the card from tampering and substitution.

So what exactly do these requirements mean for you (and your vendor)? In essence, Requirement 12.9 requires third parties to provide in writing the details of its role in providing PCI compliancy, as well as any requirements of your organization. Requirement 12.9 is relevant to Requirement 9.9 as it relates to devices used to scan or input credit card information. The vendor’s compliancy requirements could require the entity to adhere to Requirement 9.9 by protecting and monitoring devices used by the entity to scan or input credit card information. And because it’s ultimately the responsibility of your organization to protect client credit card information, it is important that your business obtain the PCI requirements of any vendors you work with and adhere to the requirements of their PCI Compliancy Standards.  It is always best practice to document in detail when testing for PCI or communicating with your vendor.

Remaining Three Best Practice PCI Compliance Requirements

The other three PCI compliance “best practice” requirements are listed below. These may or may not be items to be addressed by your organization depending on your current PCI classification. It’s best to review and determine if your entity needs to add to your current PCI testing procedures.

  • Requirement: 6.5.10 – Broken authentication and session management. Secure authentication and session management prevents unauthorized individuals from compromising legitimate account credentials, keys, or session tokens that would otherwise enable the intruder to assume the identity of an authorized user.
  • Requirement: 8.5.1 – Service providers with remote access to customer premises (for example,  for support of POS systems or servers) must use a unique authentication credential (such as a password/phrase) for each customer.
  • Requirement: P. 93 11.3 P. 55 6.5 – Implement a methodology for Penetration testing.  See P. 93 of the Payment Card Industry (PCI) Data Security Standard v3.0 data sheet for details.

The End of Outdated Secure Sockets Layer Encryption Protocol

Finally, in April 2015 the PCI Security Standards Council published a new version of the Payment Card Data Security Standard that calls for ending the use of the outdated Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) encryption protocol. The new standard requires that the use of SSL be discontinued and replaced by the use of the more secure Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol. The deadline for this change has been set at June 2016.

Remember, although you may employ a vendor to process credit card payments, it is still your client’s data and the ultimate need to protect that data is assumed by you.

We hear of new breaches daily, so it’s in the best interest of your organization to know the responsibilities of your organization for PCI Compliancy.  Don’t assume that all the responsibility is on a third party vendor because it is all of our responsibility to maintain security and keep the integrity of our data secure.

By Joe Welker, CISA (New Philadelphia office)

 

Related Articles

Do You Know Who Has Access To Your IT Network?

How Can I Protect My Business From A Data Security Breach?

How Much Is Your Data Worth To Criminals?

Share Button

The Billy Beane Approach To Business Success

Tuesday, June 23rd, 2015
Big Data, Business and Baseball - Rea & Associates - Ohio CPA Firm

While most baseball teams attempt to excel in all aspects of the game, The Oakland A’s ushered in a different type of strategy – one rooted in the power of optimizing a single data point – getting hits to get the team’s players on base.

It’s summer and that means that baseball season is in full swing. I don’t know about you, but nothing truly beats the feeling of spending a few hours in a stadium cheering for your favorite team – mine just happens to be the Cleveland Indians.

While I am a devoted fan and will support my team at nearly every opportunity (Go Tribe!), I must confess that there are days when, rather than have my heart broken by another loss, I opt to spend my time watching something a little more … encouraging. So, the other night I turned to the movie Moneyball for some baseball-themed comfort.

Read Also: Is Your Business Batting A Thousand?

Based on a true story, Moneyball follows Oakland A’s General Manager Billy Beane as he attempts to overcome multiple challenges in the hopes of taking his baseball team to the next level by leveraging cost effective measures to transform his team. I was particularly struck by the part when Billy, played by Brad Pitt, made a point to zero in on a single characteristic in the hopes of taking his team to the top – hitting. Moving forward with this strategy, Billy turned to data for answers.

Big Data, Business and Baseball

I’m willing to bet that almost everybody reading this post right now is at least somewhat familiar with the term “Big Data.” Some of us are generally aware of its role in business while others help facilitate the collection of data and are ultimately responsible for its collection and interpretation. Then there are others who are acutely aware of Big Data’s magnitude. These are the people who readily acknowledge how data is being used to track our buying behavior, monitor our interests and influence our interactions with others. Today, it is common practice to zero in on the details, which may have cost us our ability to see the forest through the trees – but at least we know that our trees look fabulous.

The Big Data concept is articulated in Moneyball. While most baseball teams devote countless hours to offensive and defensive strategies in an attempt to excel in all aspects of the game, The Oakland A’s ushered in a different type of strategy – one rooted in the power of optimizing a single data point – getting hits to get the team’s players on base.

Billy’s strategy can apply to your business success as well. For example, if you are able to focus on your business’s key driver while cutting out the aspects of your business that are holding you back (such as a poorly selling product, costly production or a minimal return on a particular investment) you can take the steps to increase your efficiency, company-wide value and ability to meet a growing demand. And consider watching Moneyball for inspiration – it sure beats tuning in to another lackluster performance by the Indians.

By Katie Snyder (Wooster Office)

 

Related Articles

How Can A Focus On Inventory Management Help My Business?
Cash Flow Is King: Where Do You Need To Focus?
Getting Back To Business: How Outsourcing May Provide Relief To Your Business

 

Share Button

Can Your Business Survive An Employee Exodus?

Tuesday, June 23rd, 2015
Do Your Employees Love Their Jobs - Rea & Associates - Ohio CPA Firm

It’s easy to blame the pay scale when an employee leaves or when it becomes a struggle to recruit new talent and it’s common for top performers to leave for bigger and brighter opportunities that promise a larger pay check. But sometimes, the reason a top performer leaves has nothing to do with dollar signs. Sometimes their departure has everything to do with whether they believe their work is appreciated. When an employee does a good job, do you let them know?

As the economy continues to improve, it’s more important than ever to remain focused on the well-being of your team – because if you don’t, somebody else will.

Just because your employees aren’t actively looking for another job opportunity, doesn’t mean that other companies aren’t looking for them. And that makes

your responsibility to keep them happy in their current position or company more important than ever. Maybe your closest competitors have begun to regularly communicate with members of your team as part of a strategy to siphon your top talent or maybe an appealing job posting on LinkedIn has prompted one of your best employees to take a critical look at their current situation. While widespread mutiny among your rank-and-file may not top your list of business threats, it’s a real possibility that must be given proper consideration. If key members of your team determine that the grass is, indeed, greener on the other side, you could be left shorthanded, unable to fulfill your business obligations and ultimately branded with a bad reputation.

Read: Are Your Employees Stakeholders In Your Business?

Could your business recover after taking this kind of hit?

If you’re not sure how your company would be able to handle the exit of your star employee or a mass exodus of talent, try implementing these tips into your team-building strategy to help secure your overall business structure – and ultimately your success. As an added bonus, you might be able to earn the “workplace of choice” status in your community in the process, which can have an extraordinary impact on all aspects of your organization.

Be A Better Leader

How effective you are as a leader hinges on your ability to provide support, motivation and direction to your team on a regular basis while utilizing fair and constructive methods of communication. Leadership is not just about barking orders, it’s about listening to your team and providing solutions that address challenges and promote higher levels of proactivity and efficiency. Want to be a better leader? Get involved. Listen. Be hands-on. And actively demonstrate the qualities you expect to see from your team.

Encourage Ownership

When team members are able to take ownership of their work and accomplishments, they will take more pride in their work and in the company. Oftentimes, the quality of your team’s work will increase and they will be more likely to offer valuable insight into the effectiveness and shortfalls of certain aspects of their area in the organization. You can’t be everywhere and they can serve as your eyes. Your team’s intuition can be incredibly valuable and can help improve your business’s processes and procedures. One way to encourage your team to take ownership is to give them the chance to walk away with a bonus for their efforts. Individual and company performance bonus plans have been successfully implemented in many businesses.

Environment Matters

Want to know the best way to drive your employees away? Make them work in cramped space with poor lighting, uncomfortable working conditions and outdated facilities. On the other hand, if attracting great hires and retaining top talent is your goal, be sure to provide your team with the tools they need to do their jobs effectively while ensuring that your facilities are up-to-date and the working conditions are manageable. Just like you, your employees are working harder than ever to earn a living. Another great way to satisfy your team is to understand that many of the men and women working for you are part of a household that depends on both parents working full-time jobs. Therefore, respecting the need for greater work/life balance might also give your business the edge when it comes to attracting and retaining top talent.

Be Generous With Feedback

It’s easy to blame the pay scale when an employee leaves or when it becomes a struggle to recruit new talent and it’s common for top performers to leave for bigger and brighter opportunities that promise a larger pay check. But sometimes, the reason a top performer leaves has nothing to do with dollar signs. Sometimes their departure has everything to do with whether they believe their work is appreciated. When an employee does a good job, do you let them know? When your team works together to fulfill an especially difficult quota, do you speak up? When you notice that one, two, 10 or more members of your team are struggling, do you take the time to work with them and help them overcome their challenges? When you take the time to give employees feedback with regard to how well they are performing their specific job duties, you help provide them with a roadmap for their own success. Some companies have begun to implement longevity awards to help acknowledge their team for the great work they do. These rewards are not only great incentives, they become points of pride.

Email Rea & Associates to learn more about the benefits a great team can have on your company’s bottom line.

By Tom Jeffries, CPA (Millersburg office)

 

Related Articles

Employees On The Fence? Ten Reasons To Join Your Ohio 401(k)
Ohio Prepares For Year Three Of Its Workforce Training Voucher Program
What Are The Top 5 Challenges Business Owners Face In Today’s Economy?

Share Button