Archive for the ‘Accounting’ Category

Help Is Available For Small Manufacturers Impacted By Foreign Imports

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

America is the land of the free, and a place where we’re all supposed to have boundless opportunities. So if you’re the business owner of a small manufacturer, and you’re feeling financially and competitively pinched because of foreign imports, know that there is relief.

Trade Adjustment Assistance

The U.S. Department of Commerce’s Economic Development Administration developed and funds a program to help manufacturing companies become more competitive against foreign imports. The program, “Trade Adjustment Assistance for Firms,” provides up to $75,000 in matching funds to qualifying manufacturers to invest in projects identified during the plan development phase. Qualifying projects must be time-limited and performed by third parties who provide knowledge-based help covering the areas of marketing, industrial and systems engineering or financial and general management consulting.

Examples of “qualifying projects” include:

  • New product development marketing
  • Lean manufacturing implementations
  • Quality certifications (ISO, TS)
  • Enterprise resource planning (system selection, training)

“Non-qualifying” projects include:

  • Capital expenditures (e.g. equipment or software)
  • On-going business expenses (e.g. FTE salaries)
  • On-going business processes

Big Benefit Of Trade Adjustment Assistance for Firms Program

An added benefit of the program is a customized diagnostic survey and comprehensive action plan created for the business by the program’s personnel. There is no fee to apply to the program. Once eligibility for the program is confirmed, the plan development phase typically takes one to three months with the implementation phase able to run for up to five years. Any funds not expended after five years are lost.

Funding for this program was recently renewed so now is the time to invest 30 minutes of your time to speak with a program representative to see if you qualify.

Ohio Small Manufacturer Help

If you’re an Ohio Small Manufacturer that’s having trouble keeping up with foreign imports and competition, and needs assistance with strengthening your business’s bottom line, contact Rea & Associates. Our Ohio manufacturing service team can help you evaluate your business’s current financial state and determine what steps you need to take to get back in the game.

Author: Christopher E. Axene, CPA (Dublin office)

 

Looking for more Ohio manufacturing-related articles? Check these blog posts out:

How Can Manufacturers Deal With Competition?

How Can I Solve My Staffing Woes In The Manufacturing Industry?

How Do You Take Your Business to the Next Level?

 

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What You Need To Know About Obamacare Employee Dumping

Thursday, June 5th, 2014

You may have heard some buzz lately about the Obama administration and/or the IRS barring employers from “dumping” employees onto the health care exchanges – with some truly severe cash penalties for doing so. But is this really “new” news? What exactly does this mean? It might surprise you to know that employee dumping is not all it seems.

A recent New York Times article explains that “employee dumping” is the practice where an employer drops health insurance coverage to its employees, the employees go to the health care exchange to buy insurance, and then the employer on a pre-tax basis reimburses its employees for their premiums. This “have-your-cake-and-eat-it-too” approach (with various ways to accomplish it) was one of the leading responses to this legislation that Obamacare consultants developed. The administrating agencies (IRS, HHS, DOL) shut this option down when they issues guidance in September 2013. ANY attempt by an employer to pay an employee a pre-tax benefit for health insurance has since then been a very dangerous approach, although some exceptions exist (e.g. retirees only). This current “news” is simply a clarification that these things are indeed busted.

Can You Still Drop Health Care Insurance Coverage?

What if you want to drop your coverage, send employees to the exchange, and then increase their after-tax pay so that they can pay for exchange insurance? That’s OK, it doesn’t conflict with the rules. It’s only pre-tax benefits you should be concerned with.

What if you increase worker pay as I just described, and then the employee sinks that cash into an HSA that they get from a bank (for free)? That gets them a tax deduction (up to certain limits) … is that OK?  Yes! Remember that what the IRS is looking to prevent is employers trying to give pre-tax benefits without offering insurance – that is the “evil” that these regulations are designed to combat. Once the employer pays taxable wages to an employee, the employee is free to use whatever means they have available to be tax efficient.

A Pit Trap For The Unwary

So is “employee dumping” limited to the situation where employers are trying to push tax-free cash to employees? Actually no, and this is why I refer to this as “a pit trap for the unwary.” Dumping also refers to the practice of employers encouraging workers with high medical bills to go to the exchange.

What exactly does this mean? Think of it this way … As an employer, you have an insurance plan that still takes into account the health and claims of your workforce (they still exist). If you can get an employee to the exchange that has $400,000 of medical costs a year, you could potentially save a large sum of money and your employee is not harmed because they can get quality coverage on the exchange for no more than a healthy individual can.

Some companies throw a cash kicker on top for the employee to voluntarily drop coverage (what’s an extra $10,000 in cash if you are saving $100,000+). Everybody wins, right?  Well, not the Exchange. If it’s discovered that you – the employer – are doing this, there are administrative rules in place that can throw that cost back at you. Insurance companies have a duty to report suspected employee dumping, so be careful!

Obamacare Help

Have you considered “dumping” or are you unsure if you’re heading down this path? If so, contact Rea & Associates. Our team of Ohio tax professionals can help you determine what path is best for you to take, as well as help you stay in compliance with Obamacare rules and avoid any pitfalls along the way.

Author: Joe Popp, JD, LLM (Dublin office)

 

Interested in reading more on how Obamacare will impact you and your business? Check out these posts:

Peeling Back The Onion: Answering 3 Popular Obamacare Questions

Health Insurance Options: SHOP, Drop, Roll, or Self-insure?

How Will ACA Federal Exchange Premiums Affect Ohio Small Businesses and Consumers? 

 

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Do Your Business Metrics Need an Oil Change?

Friday, May 23rd, 2014

Did you ever notice that little sticker in the upper left-hand corner of your windshield? The one that informs you your next service date for changing the oil and tire rotation. As you fire up the ignition, the fuel gauge is activated and the miles per gallon information is displayed. The on-board computer lets you know that the headlights are in the automatic position and the tires are properly inflated. The navigation system may even provide a weather update or a construction delay on the interstate. Within a matter of seconds of entering your vehicle, you have virtually all of the important metrics for your upcoming road trip.

Your business metrics and performance indicators should be as easy as locating your vehicle’s metrics. The metrics need to be meaningful to you and your team and used as a decision making tool in the day-to-day operations of the business. Many business owners and managers use daily and quarterly metrics more frequently than the monthly financial statements to run the day to day operations.

Business Metrics To Consider

Your business’s on-board computer can churn metric after metric and ratio after ratio. However, the quality of the metrics is far more important than the quantity. One recommendation is to identify four to six ratios that are unique to your business and industry and continue to study the trends on a daily or weekly basis. As a general rule, every business should consider metrics in the following areas:

  • Customer Metrics: How many new customers have you acquired over the last six months? How many customers have you lost? What is the average profit margin for each customer?
  • Cash Flow Metrics: These metrics should be designed to measure the company’s ability to meet obligations as they come due. For example: Is your inventory turning? How old are your accounts receivable?
  • Sales Metrics: A company should have sales metrics to measure sales and whether the sales are satisfactory for the company.
  • Employee Metrics: These metrics could be designed to measure how effectively the company is hiring and managing its employees.
  • Borrowing Metrics: This metric will measure how the company is effectively managing its debt. 

Once the metrics have been determined than a “windshield sticker” or dashboard can be affixed to your technology devices and reviewed by the management team on a regular basis. In addition, an industry scorecard can be developed to measure how the business compares to the industry.

Just like the oil in a car, the business metrics will need to be changed or enhanced on a regular basis to reflect changes in the economy and the business cycle.

Safe travels and be on the look-out for orange construction barrels and detours. Check your metrics!

Business Metrics Help

If you need help determine which business metrics are right for your business, contact Rea & Associates. Our team of Ohio business consultants can help you determine which business metrics are needed for the success and growth of your business.

Author: Dave Cain, CPA (Dublin office)

 

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What Are 6 Things You Can Do To Improve The Health Of Your Business in 2014?

 

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How Can Analytics Help Reduce Fraud Risk At Your Business?

Friday, April 25th, 2014

Whether it’s due to limited resources or staffing, you may find it difficult to find time to closely review the financial activity of various departments within your business. But here’s the thing: not doing detailed reviews can leave your business exposed to increased risk of error or fraud. Incorporating analytics into your review process can be an efficient way to detect errors and fraud and will allow you to identify areas of risk within your business. Analytics are frequently part of audit procedures, and compare the correlation between key statistical data and actual financial activity.

How To Use Analytics In Your Reviews

  1. Identify the information. Identify the department, segment or line item you want to review and determine a time period that will allow the most effective review. Analytics can be used to compare financial activity on a monthly, quarterly or annual basis. Determine what information will allow for the most effective review. For example, if you’re reviewing the revenues related to food service operations you may want to breakout the revenues by type (i.e. lunches, breakfast, a la carte, adult).
  2. Identify the primary driving factors. The most important step in an analytic is identifying the primary factors that will cause significant changes in the activity you are reviewing. Use the changes in those factors to set expectations for the amount you expect the actual financial activity to change. Continuing with the example above, if you noticed the number of lunches served increased 10 percent in the current month compared to the previous month then you would expect the revenues to correlate with that change.
  3. Review the results. Compare your expectations to what actually happened. Based on the example I’ve been using, if your actual revenues decreased by 2 percent then you will want to investigate this change further. If actual revenues increased by 9 percent then you may determine the variance is acceptable and you don’t need to investigate any further.

The Discovery Of Potential Errors

If after you’ve compared the results of the analytics and identified a few areas that didn’t meet your expectations, what do you do next?

  1. Contact the person responsible for the area you reviewed. Determine if there are additional factors that would have caused the variance from your expectations.
  2. If you have determined there are no additional factors or what was communicated to you was not reasonable, you may want to consider a more detailed review. Theoretically, if you have considered all factors in your expectations, the only plausible explanation at this point for a variance is a misstatement probably due to error or fraud.
  3. If you have identified an error, review the controls and processes in place to determine what caused the error. This is where you can identify steps to improve the control strength to prevent future errors.
  4. Inform your auditors of the results of your analytics and the areas of risk you identified. This will allow your auditors to focus on these areas and provide more value to your audit. Your auditors will more than likely ask these questions and you’ll already know the answers.

Using analytics within your business will allow you to properly allocate more of your time and resources to the areas with the most risk. You will be able to efficiently identify the riskier areas and make the necessary improvements in processes and controls to address the risk.  This can prevent possible audit findings, adjustments and can even help prevent fraud.

Analytics and Financial Review Help

If you are looking to step up your game as it relates to financial reviews within your company, contact Rea & Associates. Our team of Ohio government auditors can help you incorporate analytics into your reviews so you can get a better picture of how funds are being used throughout your organization.

Authors: Chad Gorfido, CPA (Medina office), and Annie Yoder, CPA, CFE, CFF (New Philadelphia office)

 

Looking for more information on how to reduce fraud risk within your business? Check these articles out:

Does Your Audit Process Protect You From Fraud?

Have You Assessed Your Fraud Risk?

Do You Subscribe to a Fraud Hotline?

 

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What Tax Benefits Exist When You Donate to Charity?

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

We’re three months into 2014, and you may be thinking about what charitable donations you’d like to make this year. If you’re planning to make a donation to a qualified 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, make sure to look at your investment portfolio before you write a check.  (more…)

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