Archive for October, 2010

how do you evaluate and price a product line for sale?

Friday, October 29th, 2010

The price paid for a product line (or a business) is typically determined by a return on investment (ROI) calculation. The buyer estimates the future benefit stream from the product line and then determines the required rate of return that is needed to entice them to purchase it. The required rate of return is a function of how risky the future benefit stream is.  If the future benefit is in doubt or risky, the required rate of return will be higher. There is an inverse relationship between the required rate of return and the value of a product line. Our job as business valuators is to determine what the future benefit stream will be and what is the proper rate of return required for that benefit stream.

Whenever you are considering selling a business or a product line it’s important to get a true value by using a professional business evaluation. Usually the seller does not have any experience selling a product line or a business, and not knowing all the facts could cost tens of thousands of dollars. The buyer may be very sophisticated. There are many complex issues in addition to negotiating a price in a transaction that should be considered, such as the terms of a deal and the purchase price allocation. 

The terms include whether the price will be paid in cash or by a note or stock. If there is a note, the question becomes “Will this note be secured?” “Are there conditions required to be met by the seller to be paid?” and “How long will it take to pay back?” Purchase price allocation is critical to any deal. It can be the difference between paying a 15 percent tax rate on your gain or 40 percent tax rate.  

As you can see, there are many considerations to selling a product line or business. Don’t attempt to navigate the complex area of business transactions alone.

What are the long-term changes in the healthcare legislation?

Wednesday, October 20th, 2010

Looking into the Future: A Summary of Healthcare Law Changes for 2013 and Beyond

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the related Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act (which are collectively referred to as the healthcare legislation) were signed into law in March. The new laws contain a large number of tax changes. Some have nothing to do with healthcare, some won’t kick in for several years, some are effective right now, and some are even retroactively effective. (more…)

What are the Healthcare Law Changes by Year?

Monday, October 18th, 2010

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the related Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act (which are collectively referred to as the healthcare legislation) were signed into law in March, and they include lots of tax changes. Some have nothing to do with healthcare, some won’t kick in for several years, some are effective right now and some are even effective retroactively.

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What lending programs will result from Small Business Lending Funding Act?

Friday, October 15th, 2010

When President Obama signed into law last week the Small Business Jobs and Credit Act of 2010, the new law created a $30 billion lending fund that will allow the U.S. Department of Treasury to invest in small to medium-sized financial institutions that will be encouraged to increase small business lending. Here is a breakdown of the four lending initiatives established by the law. (more…)

How ready are you to transition your business?

Wednesday, October 13th, 2010

Step 1 – Making the Decision

How will you transition your business to the next generation when it’s time to leave? If you are like more than 70 percent of family business owners, you’ve put off making this important decision. And without preparation, most family-owned businesses are not successful in making the ownership change when the time comes. This post is the first of six tips we will provide to help family-owned businesses begin the succession planning process. (more…)

Are you ready for National Save for Retirement Week?

Monday, October 11th, 2010

Urgent Message from Your Future: Save Today for Tomorrow

When it comes to saving for retirement, there is never a better time than today to assess your prospects toward meeting your goals. And with our nation’s leaders declaring Oct. 17 through Oct. 23 as National Save for Retirement Week, you have a great opportunity. (more…)

How will you manage nevertirees?

Friday, October 8th, 2010

The economy impacted a lot of Americans, and many of them are staying on the job longer as a result. Some love what they do too much to walk away, others want to stay mentally active and the rest simply can’t afford to stop working. (more…)

How will the Small Business Lending Act impact my business?

Tuesday, October 5th, 2010

Small Business Lending Funding Act Establishes Four Lending Programs

When President Obama signed into law last week the Small Business Jobs and Credit Act of 2010, the new law created a $30 billion lending fund that will allow the U.S. Department of Treasury to invest in small to medium-sized financial institutions that will in turn be encouraged to increase small business lending. Here is a breakdown of the four lending initiatives established by the law.

Small Business Lending Fund. Administered by the U.S. Treasury, the Small Business Lending Fund will award a capital investment to eligible banks with assets under $10 billion. The banks can receive up to a small percentage of their risk-weighted assets, and receive essentially an incentive loan that must be repaid within 10 years. The banks must lend additional funds to small businesses as well as appropriate advertising. The fund also includes a pilot program that will allow non-profit intermediaries to make loans to small businesses at 1 percent interest over a 20-year term. The non-profit intermediaries can loan up to $200,000 per small business through the pilot program.

State Small Business Credit Initiative. A seven-year State Small Business Credit Initiative will be administered by the U.S. Treasury. Treasury will allocate federal funds to participating states with capital access programs. States can qualify for the funds by demonstrating that their capital access programs meet performance and eligibility requirements, including access to capital for businesses with less than 500 employees, minority-owned businesses and those in underserved communities. New programs can also qualify for the federal funds.

Small Business Early Stage Investment Program. The new law amends the Small Business Investment Act of 1958 to establish an early-stage investment program to provide equity investment financing for early-stage small businesses. The program will be managed by the administrator of the Small Business Administration.

Small Business Borrower Assistance Program. Also as part of the Small Business Jobs and Credit Act of 2010, the Small Business Administration is directed to implement an assistance program that provides payments to lenders of principle and interest on qualifying guaranteed business loans of up to $300,000. Every borrower receiving a qualifying small business loan will be automatically enrolled in the program unless the borrower opts out. The SBA’s administrator is required to commit an amount to each borrower equal to 6 percent of the principle disbursed amount of the borrower’s qualifying loan.

The Small Business Jobs and Credit Act of 2010 also contains roughly $12 million in tax breaks and incentives. We will be reporting on the various tax implications of the new law in the weeks to come.

Are Federal Payroll Tax Deposits Going Paperless?

Friday, October 1st, 2010

Regulations recently proposed by the IRS will eliminate the ability to make payroll tax deposits using paper coupons. The proposed rule changes are meant to coincide with the Treasury’s move to no longer maintain the paper coupon system after December 31, 2010. (more…)